Choosypix Photography

Oatley, Australia

Choosypix Photography

Oatley, Australia
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Mo M.,Australian Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries | Hayler P.,Choosypix Photography | Hayler A.,Choosypix Photography
Australian Field Ornithology | Year: 2016

The Powerful Owl Ninox strenua typically forages for arboreal prey; however, some authors have identified crustaceans in pellet material. This paper reports on an anecdotal observation of a juvenile Owl catching and consuming a fish. The observation was recorded at dusk in the upper reaches of tidal mangroves in one of the bushland remnants in Sydney, New South Wales, along the Georges River. The observation may constitute investigative 'play' behaviour by juvenile Owls. © 2016, Bird Observers Club of Australia (BOCA). All rights reserved.


Mo M.,Australian Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries | Hayler P.,Choosypix Photography | Hayler A.,Choosypix Photography
Australian Field Ornithology | Year: 2015

This paper describes an account of combat between two Powerful Owls Ninox strenua in the St George area, Sydney, NSW. The breeding pair of this territory had been followed as part of a monitoring program since July 2012. Daily photographic records from February to May 2014 provided recognition of individual birds by observing their distinctive chest patterns. Two possible interpretations of the incident were generated. Based on the identity of the aggressor and a male changeover in the territory, the combat incident was believed to be a contest between rival males.


Mo M.,Australian Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries | Waterhouse D.R.,4 1 5 Ada Street | Hayler P.,Choosypix Photography | Hayler A.,Choosypix Photography
Australian Zoologist | Year: 2016

Mobbing is an anti-predator strategy in which prey animals, notably birds and mammals, aggravate a potential predator to either distract or drive them from the vicinity. The Powerful Owl Ninox strenua is a large forest owl endemic to eastern Australia that preys mainly on arboreal mammals and birds. We identified records of 30 species of birds and one mammal known to mob the Powerful Owl from scientific literature and unpublished studies. In our study in southern Sydney, Powerful Owls were most frequently mobbed by Noisy Miners Manorina melanocephala and Pied Currawongs Strepera graculina, followed by Grey Butcherbirds Cracticus torquatus and Australian Magpies Cracticus tibicen.We observed mobbing by three species of bird and one mammal that were not previously recorded as mobbing species, including agonistic responses by a Tawny Frogmouth Podargus strigoides and Common Brushtail Possum Trichosurus vulpecula during the time owls were active.

Loading Choosypix Photography collaborators
Loading Choosypix Photography collaborators