Chongqing, China
Chongqing, China

Chongqing University is a key national university located in Chongqing, China,and a member of the "Excellence League". Chongqing University is also one of the "Project 211 and Project 985” universities with full support in the construction and development from the central government and the Chongqing Municipal Government. Among its various departments, Chongqing University is especially highly ranked in the Built Environment, Engineering, Technology, and Business disciplines. Wikipedia.

SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

The Advisory Council is led by Swamy Kotagiri, Magna Chief Technology Officer (CTO), and consists of some of the most recognized and respected experts in the global automotive and tech industries. The council brings a wider circle of insight, knowledge and experience from various industries that ultimately helps accelerate the execution of Magna's technology and business objectives. "The pace of innovation in the automotive industry is like nothing we have ever seen before, creating even more challenges and opportunities," said Kotagiri.  "At Magna, we welcome the challenge and aim to seize the opportunities by continuing to leverage our culture of innovation, while embracing a new level of innovation outreach.  We are excited to have such a distinguished group of individuals bringing their vision and insights to our company." Advisory Council members will provide high-level strategic planning insights and experience in the areas of advanced driver assistance systems, environmental and automotive safety, overall industry trends, and next-generation technologies. Chaired by Kotagiri, the Advisory Council is comprised of six members who are recognized leaders in their respective fields, several of whom have significant experience in product innovation and the implementation of new technologies. "Magna's deep vehicle systems knowledge and electronics capabilities, combined with its global engineering and manufacturing expertise, are remarkable," said Tony Fadell. "They are in a great position to help drive change in the auto industry and I am excited to be working with such an innovative company." "Magna is a company committed to helping define the future of mobility and I am delighted to be a part of such a distinguished group of individuals who collectively can bring new opportunities to Magna and the industry," said Dr. Ian Hunter. Swamy Kotagiri is globally responsible for managing Magna's innovation and new product strategy and development.  As CTO, Kotagiri helps Magna's product groups bring innovative ideas to the market, which allows the company to move the automotive industry forward. Mei-Wei Cheng is a member of the Board of Directors of Seagate Technology PLC and recently served as non-executive Chairman of Pactera.  He was the former CEO and President for the Chinese subsidiaries of AT&T, Siemens Ford Motor Company and General Electric. He holds a bachelor's degree in industrial engineering/operations research from Cornell University and an MBA from Rutgers University. Tony Fadell is the inventor of the iPod, an inventor of the iPhone, and founder of Nest, the company that pioneered the "Internet of things".  He is an active investor and entrepreneur with a 25-year history of founding companies and designing products that improve people's lives. Fadell has authored more than 300 patents.  In May 2016, TIME named Nest Thermostat, the iPod and iPhone as three of the "50 Most Influential Gadgets of All Time." Dr. Ian Hunter is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering and runs the BioInstrumentation Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  Dr. Hunter has filed over 150 patents, produced more than 500 scientific and engineering publications, and has founded and/or co-founded 25 companies. He received his bachelor's, master's and doctorate degrees from the University of Auckland and completed a post-doctoral fellowship in the department of Biomedical Engineering at McGill University in Canada. John Maddox is the CEO of the American Center for Mobility. He began his career as a Research Engineer at Ford Motor Company and has held positions such as Associate Administrator at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and Compliance Officer at Volkswagen North America. He holds a degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Maryland and a master's degree in engineering management from the University of Detroit Mercy. Paul Mascarenas is a member of the Board of Directors at ON Semiconductor and the United States Steel Corporation.  He previously held a number of senior leadership positions at Ford Motor Company, most recently serving as Chief Technical Officer.  Paul holds a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the University of London, King's College in England and holds an honorary doctorate degree from Chongqing University in China. ABOUT MAGNA We are a leading global automotive supplier with 317 manufacturing operations and 102 product development, engineering and sales centres in 29 countries. We have over 155,000 employees focused on delivering superior value to our customers through innovative products and processes, and world class manufacturing. We have complete vehicle engineering and contract manufacturing expertise, as well as product capabilities which include body, chassis, exterior, seating, powertrain, active driver assistance, vision, closure and roof systems. We also have electronic and software capabilities across many of these areas.  Our common shares trade on the Toronto Stock Exchange (MG) and the New York Stock Exchange (MGA). For further information about Magna, visit our website at www.magna.com. THIS RELEASE MAY CONTAIN STATEMENTS WHICH CONSTITUTE "FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS" UNDER APPLICABLE SECURITIES LEGISLATION AND ARE SUBJECT TO, AND EXPRESSLY QUALIFIED BY, THE CAUTIONARY DISCLAIMERS THAT ARE SET OUT IN MAGNA'S REGULATORY FILINGS. PLEASE REFER TO MAGNA'S MOST CURRENT MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF RESULTS OF OPERATIONS AND FINANCIAL POSITION, ANNUAL INFORMATION FORM AND ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 40-F, AS REPLACED OR UPDATED BY ANY OF MAGNA'S SUBSEQUENT REGULATORY FILINGS, WHICH SET OUT THE CAUTIONARY DISCLAIMERS, INCLUDING THE RISK FACTORS THAT COULD CAUSE ACTUAL EVENTS TO DIFFER MATERIALLY FROM THOSE INDICATED BY SUCH FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS. THESE DOCUMENTS ARE AVAILABLE FOR REVIEW ON MAGNA'S WEBSITE AT WWW.MAGNA.COM.


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: phys.org

A new UK-China collaborative project is developing a sensor to provide an easy, low-cost method of diagnosing hepatitis on the spot using graphene – an advanced 2-D material known for its high electrical conductivity. The sensor will be the first to simultaneously test for three types of hepatitis – A, B and C – out of the five types that exist. The multi-partner project, supported by the UK's Newton Fund and led by Biovici, will bring together the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), the University of Chongqing, Swansea University, and industry partner CTN, to develop this new diagnostic technology. Hepatitis is a huge global health problem, with nearly 400 million people worldwide affected, resulting in over 1.4 million deaths per year. The World Health Organisation has reported that 257 million people are infected with hepatitis B alone. Those affected with hepatitis suffer chronic infection, resulting in one million deaths per annum from liver cirrhosis and cancer, with 40% of those deaths occurring in China. Funded by the UK's Newton Fund, which aims to promote the economic development and social welfare of partner countries by strengthening science and innovation capacity, this project aims to help tackle the incidence of hepatitis in China. Hepatitis B in particular is endemic in China, with one-third of the 350 million infected individuals worldwide residing in China. Blood tests are currently used as the diagnostic method for hepatitis, but there are challenges associated with this. With blood tests, results can take five to seven days, during which patients are still contagious and therefore a risk to the non-infected. Moreover, the technique is invasive and expensive, as it requires medical personnel. Graphene is a 2-D material with unique electrical and mechanical properties, which derive from its one-atom-thick structure. The material's exceptional electronic characteristics, surface sensitivity and selectivity make it ideal for sensor applications, including those used for medical diagnosis. To date, graphene electrochemical biosensors exist for diagnosing one type of hepatitis. This project, however, will develop sensors for the detection of three hepatitis types at a time, by using three graphene sensors, each tailored to identify the antibodies associated with a certain strain of hepatitis, integrated in a single test. Unlike conventional blood tests, this sensor will provide a non-invasive, quick and less expensive screening method. The ease and speed of this method will be beneficial for bulk testing of the food, agriculture and education workforces in China, over 300 million people, for whom tests are obligatory. The team's approach is to use the graphene sensor technology to develop a point of care diagnostic for early detection and monitoring of multiple salivary or serum-based hepatitis biomarkers. This will be a novel, real-time monitoring sensor technology, based on chemically-modified graphene, that simultaneously monitors for hepatitis A, B and C. The test will be simple, low-cost and rapid, similar to a blood glucose sensor or pregnancy test, but testing saliva instead. This two-year project will develop a prototype, and establish the reliability, stability and sensitivity of the sensor in preparation for its commercialisation. It is estimated that if the sensor is produced in large quantities, each device could cost as little as £1 GBP. While each of the five partners involved in the project has a different role, all of their activities are required in combination for the effective development of this new technology. The two Chinese partners, CTN and Chongqing University, are responsible for graphene device production and manufacturing. On the characterisation side, NPL is carrying out electrical characterisation and testing, whilst Swansea University is conducting chemical characterisation. Lastly, Biovici, who develops next-generation POC diagnostic devices, is responsible for packaging and commercialisation. Dr Olga Kazakova, Principle Research Scientist in Advanced Materials at NPL, said: "Graphene's unique characteristics mean it has great potential to be used in a variety of sensing applications. In addition to hepatitis, it could be used in other similar tests, including allergen sensors, pollutant identification and other life sciences applications. It is imperative for us to understand the exact characteristics of the material to be able to assess how it can be manufactured and used in these different applications. This is a key focus for us and the National Graphene Metrology Centre at NPL supports the commercialisation and application of the advanced material by conducting world-leading research into its measurement and characterisation. Through this research, we are working to develop international standards for graphene which will help to unlock new applications for the incredible material." Paul Morgan, Chief Executive at Biovici, said: "This collaboration between NPL, Swansea University's Centre for NanoHealth and our partners in China opens a unique opportunity to develop a low-cost, affordable test, which will bring major benefits to the global fight against the spread of this highly infectious disease. Many people associate hepatitis as a problem that happens elsewhere and not in their home country. However, hepatitis is a global epidemic which is rapidly affecting parts of the UK, throughout Europe and the USA." Professor Owen Guy, Director (Engineering) at the Centre for NanoHealth at Swansea University, said: "Using semiconductor process technology applied to graphene enables us to make low-cost sensors. With the right lab-on-chip technology, there is the potential to develop sensors for a host of diagnostic and screening applications." Explore further: Cases of hepatitis B and C hit 325 million: WHO


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.cemag.us

A new U.K.-China collaborative project is developing a sensor to provide an easy, low-cost method of diagnosing hepatitis on the spot using graphene — an advanced 2D material known for its high electrical conductivity. The sensor will be the first to simultaneously test for three types of hepatitis — A, B, and C — out of the five types that exist. The multi-partner project, supported by the U.K.'s Newton Fund and led by Biovici, will bring together the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), the University of Chongqing, Swansea University, and industry partner CTN, to develop this new diagnostic technology. Hepatitis is a huge global health problem, with nearly 400 million people worldwide affected, resulting in over 1.4 million deaths per year. The World Health Organization has reported that 257 million people are infected with hepatitis B alone. Those affected with hepatitis suffer chronic infection, resulting in one million deaths per annum from liver cirrhosis and cancer, with 40 percent of those deaths occurring in China. Funded by the U.K.'s Newton Fund, which aims to promote the economic development and social welfare of partner countries by strengthening science and innovation capacity, this project aims to help tackle the incidence of hepatitis in China. Hepatitis B in particular is endemic in China, with one-third of the 350 million infected individuals worldwide residing in China. Blood tests are currently used as the diagnostic method for hepatitis, but there are challenges associated with this. With blood tests, results can take five to seven days, during which patients are still contagious and therefore a risk to the non-infected. Moreover, the technique is invasive and expensive, as it requires medical personnel. Graphene is a 2D material with unique electrical and mechanical properties, which derive from its one-atom-thick structure. The material's exceptional electronic characteristics, surface sensitivity and selectivity make it ideal for sensor applications, including those used for medical diagnosis. To date, graphene electrochemical biosensors exist for diagnosing one type of hepatitis. This project, however, will develop sensors for the detection of three hepatitis types at a time, by using three graphene sensors, each tailored to identify the antibodies associated with a certain strain of hepatitis, integrated in a single test. Unlike conventional blood tests, this sensor will provide a non-invasive, quick and less expensive screening method. The ease and speed of this method will be beneficial for bulk testing of the food, agriculture and education workforces in China, over 300 million people, for whom tests are obligatory. The team's approach is to use the graphene sensor technology to develop a point of care diagnostic for early detection and monitoring of multiple salivary or serum-based hepatitis biomarkers. This will be a novel, real-time monitoring sensor technology, based on chemically-modified graphene, that simultaneously monitors for hepatitis A, B and C. The test will be simple, low-cost and rapid, similar to a blood glucose sensor or pregnancy test, but testing saliva instead. This two-year project will develop a prototype, and establish the reliability, stability and sensitivity of the sensor in preparation for its commercialization. It is estimated that if the sensor is produced in large quantities, each device could cost as little as £1 GBP. While each of the five partners involved in the project has a different role, all of their activities are required in combination for the effective development of this new technology. The two Chinese partners, CTN and Chongqing University, are responsible for graphene device production and manufacturing. On the characterization side, NPL is carrying out electrical characterization and testing, whilst Swansea University is conducting chemical characterization. Lastly, Biovici, who develops next-generation POC diagnostic devices, is responsible for packaging and commercialization. Dr. Olga Kazakova, Principle Research Scientist in Advanced Materials at NPL, says, "Graphene's unique characteristics mean it has great potential to be used in a variety of sensing applications. In addition to hepatitis, it could be used in other similar tests, including allergen sensors, pollutant identification and other life sciences applications. It is imperative for us to understand the exact characteristics of the material to be able to assess how it can be manufactured and used in these different applications. This is a key focus for us and the National Graphene Metrology Centre at NPL supports the commercialization and application of the advanced material by conducting world-leading research into its measurement and characterization. Through this research, we are working to develop international standards for graphene which will help to unlock new applications for the incredible material." Paul Morgan, Chief Executive at Biovici, says, "This collaboration between NPL, Swansea University's Centre for NanoHealth and our partners in China opens a unique opportunity to develop a low-cost, affordable test, which will bring major benefits to the global fight against the spread of this highly infectious disease. Many people associate hepatitis as a problem that happens elsewhere and not in their home country. However, hepatitis is a global epidemic which is rapidly affecting parts of the U.K., throughout Europe and the U.S.A." Professor Owen Guy, Director (Engineering) at the Centre for NanoHealth at Swansea University, says, "Using semiconductor process technology applied to graphene enables us to make low-cost sensors. With the right lab-on-chip technology, there is the potential to develop sensors for a host of diagnostic and screening applications."


Disclosed are a point contact gear based on conjugate curves, a meshing pair, and a machining tool therefor. The point contact gear comprises a convex gear and a concave gear which mesh with each other in one-point or multi-point contact, and a contact curve composed of meshing points on tooth surfaces of the convex gear and a contact curve composed of the meshing points on the concave gear are the conjugate curves. Further disclosed is a point contact gear meshing pair based on conjugate curves, a meshing method of the meshing pair is making both a convex gear tooth surface and a concave gear tooth surface in one-point or multi-point contact, and a contact track of the contact points on each of the tooth surfaces is a smooth space curve. The meshing characteristics of the conjugate curves are inherited; in addition, point contact tooth profiles are high in contact strength, high in load capacity, high in transmission efficiency and low in lubricating oil temperature rise, the sliding ratio is greatly lowered, and abrasion is low.


Patent
Chongqing University, Chongqing University of Science and Technology | Date: 2016-09-22

A method of using a device for conducting a vascular hemodynamic bionic cell experiment is provided, the method comprises: firstly, experiment preparation; and secondly, experiment operation, namely, switching on a peristaltic pump, pumping a circulation liquid from a collection bottle into an independently corresponding shunting chamber of a corresponding shunting bottle through a collection bottle sampling tube of an independent chamber of a collection bottle, after shunting by the shunting chamber of the shunting bottle, the circulation liquid flowing out of a branch shunting tube flows to a corresponding flow chamber on the 1-3 flow chamber platforms placed side by side, and then converging the circulation liquid to a corresponding independent chamber of the collection bottle through respective sampling tubes of the flow chamber platforms. The method provided by the present disclosure has the technical characteristics of strong practicability and low manufacturing cost, and can perform a vascular hemodynamic bionic cell experiment under multiple conditions with multiple parameters when used in combination with different models of shunting bottles and flow chamber platforms.


Residual tensile stresses often increase the susceptibility to cold cracking, and also promote brittle fracture, fatigue failure, and stress corrosion cracking in combination with tensile stresses experienced during service. Welding-induced deformation usually degrades the performance of a structure. Thus, the control of welding residual stress and distortion is a crucial task in welding manufacturing. There are too many factors that affect welding residual stresses and distortion. Besides material properties and design-related parameters, the welding procedures such as deposition sequence and assembly sequence also have significant influence on the final residual stress distribution and deformation. In this study, a computational approach based on Quick Welder software was developed to simulate the welding temperature field, residual stress distribution and deformation in multi-pass joints. The main objective was to clarify the influence of deposition sequence on the final residual stress distribution and deformation in an austenitic stainless steel tube-block joint with J-groove. The simulation results indicate that deposition sequence not only significantly affects the distribution of residual stress but also can alter the deformation mode to a certain extent. In addition, it was found that the last weld pass seems to have the largest contribution to the final welding residual stress filed of current tube-block joint. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Li X.-H.,Chongqing University
Physical Review A - Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics | Year: 2010

We present an efficient entanglement purification protocol with hyperentanglement in which additional spatial entanglement is utilized to purify the two-particle polarization-entangled state. The bit-flip error and phase-flip error can be corrected and eliminated in one step. Two remote parties can obtain maximally entangled polarization states deterministically and only passive linear optics are employed. We also discuss the protocol with practical quantum source and noisy channel. © 2010 The American Physical Society.


Ding B.,Chongqing University
IEEE Transactions on Fuzzy Systems | Year: 2011

This paper addresses the output feedback predictive control for a Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy system with bounded noise. The controller optimizes an infinite-horizon objective function respecting the input and state constraints. The control law is parameterized as a dynamic output feedback that is dependent on the membership functions, and the closed-loop stability is specified by the notion of quadratic boundedness. Online algorithms that guarantee the recursive feasibility of the convex optimization problem and the convergence of the augmented state to a neighborhood of the equilibrium point are proposed in this paper. A numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed output feedback controllers. © 2011 IEEE.


This paper considers stabilization of discrete-time linear systems, where network exists for transmitting the sensor and controller information, and arbitrary bounded packet loss occurs in the sensorcontroller link and the controlleractuator link. The stabilization of this system is transformed into the robust stabilization of a set of systems. The stability result for this system is specially applied on model predictive control (MPC) that explicitly considers the satisfaction of input and state constraints. Two synthesis approaches of MPC are presented, one parameterizing the infinite horizon control moves into a single state feedback law, the other into a free control move followed by the single state feedback law. Two simulation examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed techniques. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


This paper considers output feedback robust model predictive control for the quasi-linear parameter varying (quasi-LPV) system with bounded disturbance. The so-called quasi-LPV means that the varying parameters of the linear system are known at the current time, but unknown in the future. The control law is parameterized as a parameter-dependent dynamic output feedback, and the closed-loop stability is specified by the notion of quadratic boundedness. An iterative algorithm is proposed for the on-line synthesis of the control law via convex optimization. A numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the controller. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Loading Chongqing University collaborators
Loading Chongqing University collaborators