Chitose, Japan

The Chitose Institute of Science and Technology is a technical university in Chitose, Hokkaido, Japan. It was established in 1998. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

Hasegawa M.,Chitose Institute of Science and Technology
Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing | Year: 2017

Youngster’s Science Festival in Chitose was started 10 years agok, and since then, this science event has been held once a year. Its original and main objective is laid in providing children in local community with opportunities for triggering their interests in various fields of natural science and technology through experiment demonstrations. In its early years, majority of demonstrators were active and retired teachers from elementary to ternary schools and educational institutes as well as university and high school students. Some people from industrial sectors also joined to serve as demonstrators explaining some technologies related to their corporate activities. The number of such participants from industry has been recently increasing. Moreover, scopes of the demonstrations have been expanded over the years so as to include certain fields in social sciences. For such fields, local residents who are voluntarily involved in lifelong educational activities have become main demonstrators who explain their achievements. Now, Youngster’s Science Festival in Chitose has become a successful science event in the local community which has been served as appropriate opportunities, not only for providing children with triggering opportunities for getting familiar with STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields, but also for allowing wider generations from parents to grandparent ages to enjoy lifelong educational activities. In order to enhance advantages obtainable through the event, establishment of collaborations among various sectors in the local community is very important. © Springer International Publishing AG 2017.


Sakai K.-I.,Chitose Institute of Science and Technology | Ishikawa T.,Chitose Institute of Science and Technology | Akutagawa T.,Tohoku University
Journal of Materials Chemistry C | Year: 2013

We report the emission wavelength tunability of an excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) fluorophore, 2,4-dibenzothiazolylphenol (2,4-DBTP), and its application to white light generation. In a nonpolar solvent, yellow fluorescent 2,4-DBTP had a maximum emission around 560 nm, but did not absorb light in the blue region (400-500 nm) because of its large Stokes shift. In a polar solvent, however, a phenol proton of 2,4-DBTP involving in ESIPT is dissociated by solvent molecules, giving rise to blue emission. By dissolving the fluorophore in a polar-nonpolar solvent mixture, we observed white emission with a broad band ranging from 400 to 650 nm, a consequence of the small overlap between the absorption spectrum of the yellow-emitting form and the fluorescence spectrum of the blue-emitting form. We also successfully fabricated a white-emitting polymer film using yellow-emitting 2,4-DBTP and a representative blue fluorescent dye (perylene) as dopants. Our fluorophore will be useful for environmentally sensitive fluorescent probes and white organic light-emitting diodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Eguchi M.,Chitose Institute of Science and Technology
Journal of the Optical Society of America B: Optical Physics | Year: 2011

A multilayered effective-index method (ML-EIM) is applied to dielectric waveguides with complicated microstructures, including photonic crystal fibers and multicore fibers. In this method, the waveguide cross section is divided into multiple layers, each of which consists of a slab waveguide clipped from an arbitrary continuous cross section. Using an effective-index method for the multiple layers, the waveguide can be approximated by a simple multilayer slab structure consisting of effective refractive index layers. The ML-EIM allows us to analyze waveguides with arbitrarily complicated cross-sectional shapes using only one-dimensional slab analysis. The mode field distributions peculiar to these waveguide structures are reproduced with good accuracy by ML-EIM and their validity is confirmed by comparison with two-dimensional numerical results. © 2011 Optical Society of America.


Kato K.,Chitose Institute of Science and Technology | Umemura N.,Chitose Institute of Science and Technology
Optics Letters | Year: 2011

The Sellmeier equations for GaS and GaSe are constructed from the nonlinear experiments thus far reported in the literature. The model calculations based on these equations were found to reproduce well the phase-matching conditions for second-harmonic generation of the Er:YSGG laser at 2:7960μm and the CO2 laser lines at 9.5862 and 10:5910μm achieved in the GaS xSe1-x crystals having different S concentrations of 0:004-0:412. © 2011 Optical Society of America.


Karasawa N.,Chitose Institute of Science and Technology
Applied Optics | Year: 2012

Dispersion properties of liquid-core photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) with large air fraction in clads between 300 to 2000 nm have been calculated by a multipole method for various liquids including CS2, toluene, chloroform, and water for different core diameters. In calculations, air holes are assumed to be arranged in a regular hexagonal array in fused silica, and a central hole is filled with liquid to create a core. The results are compared with those obtained by a fully vectorial effective index method, and fitting parameters for core sizes are found for each liquid except for water, where the latter method does not give correct dispersions at short wavelengths. Also, the power ratios inside liquid cores and effective core areas were calculated at different wavelengths. © 2012 Optical Society of America.


Eguchi M.,Chitose Institute of Science and Technology
Journal of the Optical Society of America B: Optical Physics | Year: 2010

A multistep-index (MSI) plastic optical fiber (POF) has been intensively studied as an alternative to highbandwidth graded-index (GI) POFs during the past decade. The propagation modes in MSI POFs are more complicated than those of GI POFs. We obtain all the propagation modes in MSI large-core highly multimode fibers with a core diameter of 500 μm by the use of a finite-element method and demonstrate that many modes in MSI fibers have anomalous behavior which cannot be observed in power-law profile fibers. Our numerical results elucidate detailed transmission properties of MSI large-core highly multimode fibers, including the effective index, group delay, mode field, root-mean-square pulse width, and bandwidth. © 2010 Optical Society of America.


Eguchi M.,Chitose Institute of Science and Technology | Tsuji Y.,Muroran Institute of Technology
Journal of Lightwave Technology | Year: 2013

In photonic bandgap (PBG) fibers, light is confined by a photonic bandgap caused by a periodic structure of air holes in the cladding regions. The doubly degenerate fundamental mode in ideal PBG fiber structures becomes slightly nondegenerate in actually produced fibers, and this causes polarization instability and polarization mode dispersion. Here, to avoid these problems, we propose a novel absolutely single-polarization PBG fiber structure with an elliptical-hole lattice core. A PBG fiber with a single-polarization bandwidth of 420 nm is numerically demonstrated. Furthermore, based on the proposed fiber structure, we report another single-polarization PBG fiber that has two absolutely single-polarization bands being orthogonal to each other. © 2012 IEEE.


Zhang Z.,Muroran Institute of Technology | Tsuji Y.,Muroran Institute of Technology | Eguchi M.,Chitose Institute of Science and Technology
IEEE Photonics Technology Letters | Year: 2014

We propose a novel polarization splitter based on coupled elliptical-hole core circular-hole holey fibers (EC-CHFs). Utilizing the single-polarization nature of the EC-CHFs, in the proposed polarization splitter, two orthogonally polarized waves couple only to different EC-CHFs and the crosstalkfree polarization splitting is realized. In addition, the coupling length for two orthogonally polarized waves can be independently designed and this splitter is easy to design. © 2014 IEEE.


Eguchi M.,Chitose Institute of Science and Technology | Tsuji Y.,Muroran Institute of Technology
Journal of the Optical Society of America B: Optical Physics | Year: 2013

When the mode field and refractive index mismatches between two spliced fibers are small, the splice loss is generally evaluated by calculating an overlap integral without reflection waves. A single-polarization circular-hole holey fiber with a core consisting of an elliptical-hole lattice (EC-CHF) has a strikingly different mode field caused by elliptical holes in the core region from those of conventional single-mode fibers (SMFs), and thus reflected radiation modes may significantly appear in splicing an EC-CHF to conventional SMFs. We study the influence of reflected radiation modes on the splice loss evaluation of optical fibers with large mode field and large refractive index mismatches through numerical analyses using a bidirectional eigenmode propagation method and a three-dimensional finite-element method. © 2013 Optical Society of America.


Zhang Z.,Muroran Institute of Technology | Tsuji Y.,Muroran Institute of Technology | Eguchi M.,Chitose Institute of Science and Technology
Journal of Lightwave Technology | Year: 2014

We proposed a novel polarization splitter based on single-polarized elliptical-hole core circular-hole holey fibers (EC-CHFs). We employed the full-vector finite element beam propagation method to demonstrate the polarization splitter which is designed by the large hole EC-CHFs (air filling fraction in core is 36.73%) and small hole EC-CHFs (air filling fraction in core is 4.08%) can completely split an arbitrarily polarized light beam into two orthogonal polarization states without any crosstalk. In addition, we also calculated the tolerance and wavelength dependence of this kind of polarization splitter. © 2014 IEEE.

Loading Chitose Institute of Science and Technology collaborators
Loading Chitose Institute of Science and Technology collaborators