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Charlotte, NC, United States

Chiquita Brands International Inc. is an American producer and distributor of bananas and other produce. The company operates under a number of subsidiary brand names, including the flagship Chiquita brand and Fresh Express salads. Chiquita is the leading distributor of bananas in the United States.Chiquita is the successor to the United Fruit Company. It was formerly controlled by Cincinnati businessman Carl H. Lindner, Jr., whose majority ownership of the company ended when Chiquita Brands International exited a prepackaged Chapter 11 bankruptcy on March 19, 2002. In 2003, the company acquired the German produce distribution company, Atlanta AG. Fresh Express salads was purchased from Performance Food Group in 2005. Chiquita's current headquarters is located in Charlotte, North Carolina.On March 10, 2014, Chiquita Brands International Inc. and Fyffes plc announced that the Boards of Directors of both companies unanimously approved a definitive agreement under which Chiquita will combine with Fyffes, in a stock-for-stock transaction that is expected to result in Chiquita shareholders owning approximately 50.7% of ChiquitaFyffes and Fyffes shareholders owning approximately 49.3% of the proposed ChiquitaFyffes, on a fully diluted basis. The agreement would have created the largest banana producer in the world and would have been domiciled in Ireland. Though an intervening offer by Cutrale and Safra groups of $611 million in August 2014 was rejected by Chiquita, with the company saying it would continue with its merger with Fyffes, on October 24, Chiquita announced that the shareholders at a Company Special Meeting had rejected the merger with Fyffes. Instead the Cutrale-Safra acquisition offer was then accepted by the shareholders. Wikipedia.


Fortescue J.A.,University of Western States | Turner D.W.,University of Western States | Romero R.,Chiquita Brands International
Functional Plant Biology | Year: 2011

Bananas and plantains (Musa spp.) may flower at any time of the year but they show seasonal variation in flowering. To determine whether photoperiod contributed to this seasonal variation, we calculated the thermal development units (DT) from planting to bunch appearance (flowering) using data from published planting date experiments in the tropics and subtropics. Minimising the coefficient of variation in DT across planting dates was used to evaluate the contribution of photoperiod and soil water balance to time of flowering. Coefficients evaluating sensitivity to photoperiod were estimated in some datasets and validated on independent datasets. Data on the rate of bunch appearance from four locations over several years were analysed to establish correlations between this, photoperiod and temperature. The time of bunch initiation was matched against photoperiod to determine whether short photoperiods delayed bunch initiation. Long photoperiods in the mid-vegetative phase hastened flowering while soil water deficits delayed it. Cultivars of the Cavendish subgroup (AAA) were more sensitive to photoperiod than the Maricongo cultivar (False Horn-type plantain, AAB). Long photoperiods during the reproductive phase were correlated with an increased rate of bunch appearance some 8 to 11 weeks later. Musa spp. show a facultative long-day response to photoperiod. © 2011 CSIRO.


Patent
Chiquita Brands International | Date: 2011-06-02

A scrubber for controlling carbon dioxide levels in a shipping container containing respiring produce is disclosed. The scrubber is relatively small, utilizes a gas-selective membrane having a CO


A large scale processing method for separating banana pulp from its peel is disclosed. In this method bananas are separated into two parts (generally in a transverse direction), each part having a tip end and a cut end. A compression force is applied to those banana parts such that the force increases from the tip end to the cut end. A device which implements that process, comprising a cutting device, a means for feeding bananas into the cutting device, and two processing conveyor devices (to apply the compression force to the banana parts), is also disclosed.


Patent
Chiquita Brands International | Date: 2012-12-14

The present invention defines an apparatus and a process for vacuum drying fruit or vegetables, particularly tropical fruit, such as bananas, mangos and pineapples, so as to provide an exceptionally sweet and flavorful fruit chip snack product which is substantially free of any additives such as frying oil, preservatives, added sugar and artificial sweeteners. The process is a vacuum drying process and utilizes a drying apparatus in the form of an autoclave which contains within it a stacked platen heat exchanger wherein trays of the fruit to be dried are placed between heated platens in the heat exchanger. The platens are heated using hot water or a hot water/steam mixture and the drying is done in the autoclave under pressure.


Patent
Chiquita Brands International | Date: 2012-12-14

The present invention defines an apparatus and a process for vacuum drying fruit or vegetables, particularly tropical fruit, such as bananas, mangos and pineapples, so as to provide an exceptionally sweet and flavorful fruit chip snack product which is substantially free of any additives such as frying oil, preservatives, added sugar and artificial sweeteners. The process is a vacuum drying process and utilizes a drying apparatus in the form of an autoclave which contains within it a stacked platen heat exchanger wherein trays of the fruit to be dried are placed between heated platens in the heat exchanger. The platens are heated using hot water or a hot water/steam mixture and the drying is done in the autoclave under pressure.

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