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The China National Nuclear Corporation is a state-owned entity founded in 1955. CNNC's president and vice-president are appointed by the Premier of the State Council. However the CNNC is a self-supporting economic corporation, not a government administrative body. It oversees all aspects of China's civilian and military nuclear programs. According to it own mission statement, it "combines military nuclear weapons production with civilian production, taking nuclear industry as the basis while developing nuclear power and promoting a diversified economy." CNNC is a nationwide industrial conglomerate integrating science, technology, industry, and international trade.The CNNC is the successor to the Ministry of Nuclear Industry which built China's first atom bomb, hydrogen bomb and nuclear submarine. It functioned as a government bureau for the national nuclear industry and reported directly to the State Council. It oversaw China's nuclear-related corporations, manufacturers, institutions, research institutes, and plants, including those related to nuclear weapons. It was responsible for the design and operation of nuclear power plants; nuclear fuel production and supply, including the processing of natural uranium, uranium conversion and enrichment, fuel assembly fabrication, spent fuel reprocessing, and nuclear waste disposal. Wikipedia.


Ye Q.,China National Nuclear Corporation
Zhongguo Dianji Gongcheng Xuebao/Proceedings of the Chinese Society of Electrical Engineering | Year: 2012

After the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear-plant accident, the safety of developing nuclear power has aroused widely attentions, and governments have taken active measures to deal with the influence of this accident. Nuclear safety and the necessity of the nuclear power development were discussed firstly. After the Fukushima incident, United States, France, Russia, England, South Korea and other nuclear countries said that they all adhere to develop nuclear power actively. Through examinations and tests of the current nuclear power stations, it can be concluded that all the nuclear power stations are safe at present. After the accident, safety inspections as well as related safety measures which had been taken in China's nuclear power design were introduced, showing that the safety of nuclear power can be guaranteed in China. The characteristics of the introduced third-generation AP1000 and EPR unit nuclear power technologies were described and compared; results showed that performances of China's independently developed third-generation nuclear power technologies have reached the international advanced level. Through the analysis on the necessity and the feasibility of the inland nuclear power construction, it has been suggested that the construction of the inland nuclear power station shall be put forward. © 2012 Chin. Soc. for Elec. Eng. Source


News Article | January 18, 2016
Site: http://www.theenergycollective.com/rss/all

The big news is that two Chinese state owned nuclear firms have announced plans to build floating nuclear power plants in the 100-300 MW range. (WNA) A demonstration floating nuclear power plant based on China National Nuclear Corporation’s (CNNC’s) ACP100S small reactor will be built by 2019. The move comes just days after China General Nuclear (CGN) said it will build a prototype offshore plant by 2020. CGN announced (next story) on 12 January that development of its ACPR50S reactor design had recently been approved by China’s National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) as part of the 13th Five-Year Plan for innovative energy technologies. CNNC said that its ACP100S reactor – a marine version of its ACP100 small modular reactor (SMR) design – had also been approved by the NDRC as part of the same plan. CNNC said its Nuclear Power Institute of China subsidiary had completed a preliminary design for a floating nuclear power plant featuring the ACP100S reactor as well as “all the scientific research work.” Construction of a demonstration unit is to start by the end of this year, with completion set for 2019. (WNA) China General Nuclear (CGN) expects to complete construction of a demonstration small modular offshore multi-purpose reactor by 2020. CGN said development of its ACPR50S reactor design had recently been approved by China’s National Development and Reform Commission as part of the 13th Five-Year Plan for innovative energy technologies. The company said it is currently carrying out preliminary design work for a demonstration ACPR50S project. Construction of the first floating reactor is expected to start next year with electricity generation to begin in 2020. The 60 MWe reactor has been developed for the supply of electricity, heat and desalination and could be used on islands or in coastal areas, or for offshore oil and gas exploration, according to CGN. The Chinese company said it is also working on the ACPR100 small reactor for use on land. This reactor will have an output of some 450 MWt (140 MWe) and would be suitable for providing power to large-scale industrial parks or to remote mountainous areas. CGN said the development of small-scale offshore and onshore nuclear power reactors will complement its large-scale plants and provide more diverse energy options. (WNA) A US House of Representatives committee has approved a bipartisan bill to support federal research and development (R&D) and stimulate private investment in advanced nuclear reactor technologies. The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology approved the Nuclear Energy Innovation Capabilities Act. The bill was introduced by energy subcommittee chairman Randy Weber (R-Texas), along with full committee ranking member Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-Texas) and chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas). The legislation directs the Department of Energy (DOE) to set priorities for federal R&D infrastructure that will enable the private sector to invest in advanced reactor technologies and provide a clear path forward to attract private investment for prototype development at DOE laboratories. It enables the private sector to partner with national laboratories for the purpose of developing novel reactor concepts, leverages DOE’s supercomputing infrastructure to accelerate nuclear energy R&D, and provides statutory direction for a DOE reactor-based fast neutron source that will operate as an open-access user facility. It also authorizes DOE to enable the private sector to construct and operate privately-funded reactor prototypes at DOE sites. In addition, the bill requires DOE to present a transparent, strategic, ten-year plan for prioritizing nuclear R&D programs. (NucNet) The global nuclear security system still has “major gaps” that prevent it from being truly comprehensive and effective, the Washington-based Nuclear Threat Initiative says in its 2016 Index. The index, which assesses nuclear materials security conditions in 24 countries with one kilogramme or more of weapons-usable nuclear materials, says there is no common set of international standards and best practices, there is no mechanism for holding states with lax security accountable, and the legal foundation for securing nuclear materials is neither complete nor universally observed. In addition to assessing the risks posed by vulnerable nuclear materials and insufficient security policies in states that don’t have materials, the index assesses for the first time the potential risks to nuclear facilities posed by sabotage and cyberattack. It says cyberattacks are increasing and a growing number of states are exploring nuclear energy even though they lack the legal, regulatory, and security frameworks to ensure that their facilities are secure as well as safe. (NucNet) Westinghouse Electric Company’s Springfields facility in the UK has reached the requirements necessary to manufacture Westinghouse small modular reactor (SMR) fuel, Westinghouse said. This milestone is “a key first” for the UK’s SMR programme and an important part of Westinghouse’s proposed partnership with the UK government to deploy SMR technology. Westinghouse Springfields achieved the milestone following a readiness assessment based upon fabrication data for two proprietary SMR fuel assemblies manufactured at the company’s Columbia fuel fabrication facility in the US state of South Carolina. Mick Gornall, managing director of Westinghouse Springfields, said manufacturing Westinghouse SMR fuel at Springfields will “secure the future of a strategic national asset” of nuclear fuel manufacturing capability. (WNA) The first of four reactor coolant pumps for the initial AP1000 unit at the Haiyang site in China’s Shandong province has been transported by road from Curtiss-Wright’s manufacturing facility in Cheswick, Pennsylvania, to the port of Philadelphia ahead of shipment to China, State Nuclear Power Technology Corporation announced yesterday. The first two such pumps for Sanmen 1 in Zhejiang province – expected in September to be the first AP1000 to start up – arrived on the site on 30 December. (NucNet) Testing of the instrumentation and control (I&C) systems has begun at Teollisuuden Voima’s (TVO) Olkiluoto-3 nuclear plant with an application for an operating licence likely to be submitted in April, TVO said. The I&C systems will be used for operating, monitoring and controlling the 1,600-MW EPR unit. In December 2015 TVO said system commissioning of the plant is expected to begin in the spring of 2016 with regular electricity generation beginning in “more than three years. TVO said the estimated schedule came from plant supplier Areva-Siemens. Commissioning of the plant is about nine years behind schedule and costs are almost three times over budget. Market Reform Essential For Nuclear In US, Says NEI (NucNet) Market reform is essential to ensure that the reliability, environmental and economic benefits of nuclear power are not taken for granted, and that reactor operators are compensated for these attributes in the same way as other low-carbon sources, Alex Flint, the Washington-based Nuclear Energy Institute’s senior vice-president for governmental affairs, said in an interview published on the NEI’s website. Mr Flint said there has been “movement to address the issue”. He said at the national level, the NEI is working with the Edison Electric Institute and the Electric Power Supply Association to make officials at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency aware of the potential challenges to grid reliability and the administration’s clean air goals. In 2015, FERC and a number of regional transmission organizations took significant steps to address flaws in electricity markets that fail to provide the price signals needed to support investment in new or existing nuclear power plants. Mr Flint said, “Urged on by the NEI and a number of energy associations, FERC has begun a rulemaking to address price suppression and promises to address other issues in future. In an encouraging sign, Exelon Corporation cited positive regional reforms in deferring decisions on the potential closing of its Clinton nuclear station in Illinois and the Ginna nuclear station in New York.” Late last year Entergy Corporation said it would close its Pilgrim-1 and Fitzpatrick reactors because of poor economic conditions for nuclear.


News Article | January 25, 2016
Site: http://www.theenergycollective.com/rss/all

EDF plans two new nuclear reactors in France by 2030 (Reuters) France’s EDF plans to build two new nuclear reactors by 2030 in a bid to start renewing its existing fleet of 58 ageing reactors, the state-controlled utility said in a document released to its unions.. The two new French reactors are part of a plan bring up to 10 European Pressurized Reactors (EPR) designed by French nuclear technology company Areva on line by 2030, EDF said. The two French EPRs would be “New Model” EPRs with improved designs, and would be financed 51% by EDF, the firm said. EDF chief executive Jean-Bernard Levy said late last year that the updated design for Areva’s EPR reactor, the EPR New Model, should be ready by around 2020. He expects France will eventually build some 30 EPR reactors to replace its current fleet, he added. He also said the company may need partners to finance the future replacement of its French nuclear fleet as EDF’s finances may not allow it to build a new fleet entirely on its own, as it did with the current fleet in the 1970s and 1980s. (WNA) An MOU for cooperation in building the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) was signed by King Abdullah City for Atomic and Renewable Energy (KA-CARE) president Hashim bin Abdullah Yamani and China Nuclear Engineering Corporation (CNEC) chairman Wang Shu Jin. No details of the size of the plant or the project timeline were disclosed. A demonstration HTR-PM unit under construction at Shidaowan near Weihai city in China’s Shandong province. That plant will initially comprise twin HTR-PM reactor modules driving a single 210 MWe steam turbine. Construction started in late 2012 and it is scheduled to start commercial operation in late 2017. A proposal to construct two 600 MWe HTRs at Ruijin city in China’s Jiangxi province passed a preliminary feasibility review in early 2015. The design of the Ruijin HTRs is based on the smaller Shidaowan demonstration HTR-PM. Construction of the Ruijin reactors is expected to start next year, with grid connection in 2021. CNEC said it is actively promoting its HTR technology overseas and has already signed MOUs with Saudi Arabia, Dubai, South Africa “and other countries and regions” to consider the construction of HTGR plants. Like all such agreements in principle, they only become realized when followed by construction contracts. Often years of negotiations take place before that happens. First South Korean APR-1400 connected to the grid (NucNet) Shin Kori 3 – the first Korean-designed APR-1400 unit to start up – has begun supplying electricity to the grid, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power announced. Construction of the unit began in October 2008 and it achieved first criticality at the end of December. It is expected to enter commercial operation in May following the completion of commissioning tests. UK Could Have First SMR In Operation By 2025, Says NuScale (NucNet) The UK’s ambitions to build small modular reactors may be realized as soon as 2025, according to Fluor Corporation’s NuScale unit, which is seeking to be a pioneer in the market. The Bloomberg wire service said NuScale plans seek the UK generic design assessment (GDA), in 2017, Tom Mundy, executive vice president for program development at the US company, was reported as saying. “Assuming the GDA is submitted and takes four years, we’d be looking at approval in 2021,” Mr Mundy said. “There’s then a 36-month construction time, so it’s plausible to expect that if all things line up, we could have a UK plant built by 2025.” (WNA) Hitachi announced the incorporation of a new UK company – Hitachi Nuclear Energy Europe – as part of its strategy to enhance its UK presence for the engineering, procurement and construction of Horizon Nuclear Power’s new nuclear power plant development at Wylfa Newydd. Horizon Nuclear Power, a 100% subsidiary of Hitachi Ltd, plans to deploy the UK Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) at two sites – Wylfa Newydd, which is on the Isle of Anglesey, and Oldbury-on-Severn, in South Gloucestershire. (Yomiuri Shimbun – Japan) The Monju fast breeder reactor must be put under the control of “an organization that can regain public trust that has now been lost in its operation and management,” writes The Yomiuri Shimbun editorial board. Nuclear Regulation Authority-conducted inspections of the reactor over the last four years have unveiled a number of regulatory violations. The editorial board writes that “an organization capable of properly carrying out required inspections is an essential condition for managing a nuclear power plant.” (N. Eng Intl) China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC) said on 18 January that its specialists have 3D printed a lower tube socket for the fuel assembly of the CAP1400 pressurised water reactor (an enlarged version of the Westinghouse AP1000), marking the first use of 3D printing to construct nuclear fuel elements in China. (NucNet) State-owned CNNC said the assemblies in a nuclear reactor are cell structures that consist of cylindrical fuel rods and complex metal parts that keep the rods in place. The various parts require high-precision manufacturing, something that has traditionally made it an expensive task. However, CNNC has now found these parts can be mass produced using 3D-molding tools based on 3D printing – greatly shortening the product development cycle, improving productivity and significantly reducing costs. CNNC said the use of 3D-printed parts is in the pre-acceptance phase and the parts will undergo extensive testing. If successful, the company will use 3D-manufacturing techniques to produce other parts that have a complicated shape. Unclear costs may lead to more delays for Polish nuclear reactor (Reuters) Poland’s conservative government may further postpone the construction of the country’s first nuclear reactor as costs remain unpredictable, Energy Minister Krzysztof Tchorzewski said. The project was first pushed in 2009 by Poland’s previous government as part of a drive to find alternatives to coal-fired power generation. The project’s official deadlines were to have the first unit operating by 2025, a delay from the original target of 2020. The minister added that the cost to build a 6-gigawatt nuclear power plant ranged from 30 billion to 50 billion zlotys ($7.3 billion to $12.2 billion) and could rise further during construction. Duke expects COL from NRC for Lee Plant this year (Charlotte Observer) Duke expects to learn this year whether the Nuclear Regulatory Commission will allow it to build a nuclear plant. Duke has the William States Lee III site in Cherokee County, S.C., but has repeatedly moved the plant’s expected operating date as it decides whether to go forward. Duke CEO Lynn Good told a high profile business group this week that the EPA’s Clean Power Plan will force more of the utility’s coal fired plants to close. She said it is time for the nation to consider the role of new nuclear power plants. She also said the decision to move forward “is difficult,” and that it is “an expense, long-rang proposition.” She gave no date for start of construction. One of the financial issues the plant faces is that North Carolina, which is in the plant’s service area, may not support a plan to bill rate payers for construction costs as they are taking place.


News Article
Site: http://phys.org/technology-news/

Nonproliferation advocates warn that recycling waste would generate weapons-usable plutonium, posing a security risk and potentially stirring a nuclear rivalry in East Asia. A new Harvard University study, co-authored by a senior Chinese nuclear engineer, gives another reason against reprocessing—that it doesn't make economic sense. The study says China could save tens of billions of dollars by storing the spent fuel, and the savings could be spent on research and on building nuclear reactors. It recommends postponing major investments in reprocessing and so-called "breeder" reactors that produce more plutonium than they consume. "China has the luxury of time, as it has access to plenty of uranium to fuel its nuclear growth for decades to come, and dry casks can provide a safe, secure, and cost-effective way of managing spent fuel for decades to come, leaving all options open for the future," the study says. China has aimed for a "closed" nuclear cycle—recycling reactor fuel instead of using it just once and disposing of it—since the early 1980s. The State Administration of Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense told The Associated Press that remained China's policy, to enhance its use of uranium resources and to cut production of nuclear waste. But the numbers of countries that do reprocessing has dwindled, because of the high costs, technical difficulties involved and the growing availability of uranium on world markets. While reprocessing reduces the level of radioactivity in nuclear waste, The Union of Concerned Scientists—an advocacy group that was founded by scientists and students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology—says it does not reduce the need for storage and secure disposal of waste. Some within China's own nuclear establishment are also questioning the merits of reprocessing as the nation mulls huge capital investments in the sector, U.S.-based experts say. One of the three authors of the Harvard study is Li Kang, who works within the China National Nuclear Corporation that oversees civilian and military nuclear programs. The preface says Li's contribution was primarily in making cost estimates based on China's experience and that he should not be held responsible for arguments in other sections of the study—which, for example, highlight the costly experience of nations such as Japan in pursuing reprocessing. The other authors are Matthew Bunn, a former White House adviser and expert at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, and Hui Zhang, who heads the school's research initiative on China's nuclear policies. Henry Sokolski, executive director of the Washington-based Nonproliferation Policy Education Center, said that Chinese nuclear experts who "care about making sure China's nuclear power program stays on schedule and safe are genuinely concerned about how financially, technically, and diplomatically risky recycling plutonium is." Sokolski, a former U.S. defense official, has written extensively on the risks of rising stocks of fissile material in East Asia. China already has the world's fastest-growing nuclear energy program as it strives to double current atomic power output from the current level within five years—a key element of its commitment to produce 20 percent of its energy from low-carbon sources by 2030. China has some experience with reprocessing. It previously produced plutonium for military uses, and in 2010 completed an experimental reprocessing facility for its civilian program at an adjacent site. The facility ran for just 10 days before shutting down because of technical problems. According to Zhang, China has started site preparation for a new reprocessing facility using its own technology, and is considering a separate, much larger $21.7 billion reprocessing plant with the French state-run nuclear company Areva. China is also considering taking a minority stake in the company. China is an important market for the world's nuclear industry giants, including the United States. The U.S. last year eased restrictions on its civilian nuclear cooperation with China to allow the reprocessing of fuel from U.S.-designed reactors for nonmilitary purposes—similar to the arrangement the U.S. has with its close ally Japan. Some U.S. lawmakers say that could lead to spiraling quantities of fissile material in the region. China itself has strongly criticized Japan, which opposes nuclear weapons, for stockpiling enough separated plutonium in-country for more than 1,300 bombs. Japan has many tons more of plutonium stored overseas. China may want to note Japan's experience with reprocessing. Its plant, built with Areva, has been more than 20 years in the making and has been plagued by delays and cost overruns. The Harvard study also notes that in the wake of the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactor meltdown in Japan in 2011, "Chinese citizens are increasingly in favor of renewable energy." Japan's reactors have been offline since the accident. It recently postponed until 2018 the reprocessing plant's opening to allow for more safety upgrades and inspections. Explore further: China says it knows how to reprocess nuclear fuel (Update 2) More information: "The Cost of Reprocessing in China": belfercenter.org/publication/26158/


News Article | January 18, 2016
Site: http://www.theenergycollective.com/rss/all

The big news is that two Chinese state owned nuclear firms have announced plans to build floating nuclear power plants in the 100-300 MW range. (WNA) A demonstration floating nuclear power plant based on China National Nuclear Corporation’s (CNNC’s) ACP100S small reactor will be built by 2019. The move comes just days after China General Nuclear (CGN) said it will build a prototype offshore plant by 2020. CGN announced (next story) on 12 January that development of its ACPR50S reactor design had recently been approved by China’s National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) as part of the 13th Five-Year Plan for innovative energy technologies. CNNC said that its ACP100S reactor – a marine version of its ACP100 small modular reactor (SMR) design – had also been approved by the NDRC as part of the same plan. CNNC said its Nuclear Power Institute of China subsidiary had completed a preliminary design for a floating nuclear power plant featuring the ACP100S reactor as well as “all the scientific research work.” Construction of a demonstration unit is to start by the end of this year, with completion set for 2019. (WNA) China General Nuclear (CGN) expects to complete construction of a demonstration small modular offshore multi-purpose reactor by 2020. CGN said development of its ACPR50S reactor design had recently been approved by China’s National Development and Reform Commission as part of the 13th Five-Year Plan for innovative energy technologies. The company said it is currently carrying out preliminary design work for a demonstration ACPR50S project. Construction of the first floating reactor is expected to start next year with electricity generation to begin in 2020. The 60 MWe reactor has been developed for the supply of electricity, heat and desalination and could be used on islands or in coastal areas, or for offshore oil and gas exploration, according to CGN. The Chinese company said it is also working on the ACPR100 small reactor for use on land. This reactor will have an output of some 450 MWt (140 MWe) and would be suitable for providing power to large-scale industrial parks or to remote mountainous areas. CGN said the development of small-scale offshore and onshore nuclear power reactors will complement its large-scale plants and provide more diverse energy options. (WNA) A US House of Representatives committee has approved a bipartisan bill to support federal research and development (R&D) and stimulate private investment in advanced nuclear reactor technologies. The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology approved the Nuclear Energy Innovation Capabilities Act. The bill was introduced by energy subcommittee chairman Randy Weber (R-Texas), along with full committee ranking member Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-Texas) and chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas). The legislation directs the Department of Energy (DOE) to set priorities for federal R&D infrastructure that will enable the private sector to invest in advanced reactor technologies and provide a clear path forward to attract private investment for prototype development at DOE laboratories. It enables the private sector to partner with national laboratories for the purpose of developing novel reactor concepts, leverages DOE’s supercomputing infrastructure to accelerate nuclear energy R&D, and provides statutory direction for a DOE reactor-based fast neutron source that will operate as an open-access user facility. It also authorizes DOE to enable the private sector to construct and operate privately-funded reactor prototypes at DOE sites. In addition, the bill requires DOE to present a transparent, strategic, ten-year plan for prioritizing nuclear R&D programs. (NucNet) The global nuclear security system still has “major gaps” that prevent it from being truly comprehensive and effective, the Washington-based Nuclear Threat Initiative says in its 2016 Index. The index, which assesses nuclear materials security conditions in 24 countries with one kilogramme or more of weapons-usable nuclear materials, says there is no common set of international standards and best practices, there is no mechanism for holding states with lax security accountable, and the legal foundation for securing nuclear materials is neither complete nor universally observed. In addition to assessing the risks posed by vulnerable nuclear materials and insufficient security policies in states that don’t have materials, the index assesses for the first time the potential risks to nuclear facilities posed by sabotage and cyberattack. It says cyberattacks are increasing and a growing number of states are exploring nuclear energy even though they lack the legal, regulatory, and security frameworks to ensure that their facilities are secure as well as safe. (NucNet) Westinghouse Electric Company’s Springfields facility in the UK has reached the requirements necessary to manufacture Westinghouse small modular reactor (SMR) fuel, Westinghouse said. This milestone is “a key first” for the UK’s SMR programme and an important part of Westinghouse’s proposed partnership with the UK government to deploy SMR technology. Westinghouse Springfields achieved the milestone following a readiness assessment based upon fabrication data for two proprietary SMR fuel assemblies manufactured at the company’s Columbia fuel fabrication facility in the US state of South Carolina. Mick Gornall, managing director of Westinghouse Springfields, said manufacturing Westinghouse SMR fuel at Springfields will “secure the future of a strategic national asset” of nuclear fuel manufacturing capability. (WNA) The first of four reactor coolant pumps for the initial AP1000 unit at the Haiyang site in China’s Shandong province has been transported by road from Curtiss-Wright’s manufacturing facility in Cheswick, Pennsylvania, to the port of Philadelphia ahead of shipment to China, State Nuclear Power Technology Corporation announced yesterday. The first two such pumps for Sanmen 1 in Zhejiang province – expected in September to be the first AP1000 to start up – arrived on the site on 30 December. (NucNet) Testing of the instrumentation and control (I&C) systems has begun at Teollisuuden Voima’s (TVO) Olkiluoto-3 nuclear plant with an application for an operating licence likely to be submitted in April, TVO said. The I&C systems will be used for operating, monitoring and controlling the 1,600-MW EPR unit. In December 2015 TVO said system commissioning of the plant is expected to begin in the spring of 2016 with regular electricity generation beginning in “more than three years. TVO said the estimated schedule came from plant supplier Areva-Siemens. Commissioning of the plant is about nine years behind schedule and costs are almost three times over budget. Market Reform Essential For Nuclear In US, Says NEI (NucNet) Market reform is essential to ensure that the reliability, environmental and economic benefits of nuclear power are not taken for granted, and that reactor operators are compensated for these attributes in the same way as other low-carbon sources, Alex Flint, the Washington-based Nuclear Energy Institute’s senior vice-president for governmental affairs, said in an interview published on the NEI’s website. Mr Flint said there has been “movement to address the issue”. He said at the national level, the NEI is working with the Edison Electric Institute and the Electric Power Supply Association to make officials at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency aware of the potential challenges to grid reliability and the administration’s clean air goals. In 2015, FERC and a number of regional transmission organizations took significant steps to address flaws in electricity markets that fail to provide the price signals needed to support investment in new or existing nuclear power plants. Mr Flint said, “Urged on by the NEI and a number of energy associations, FERC has begun a rulemaking to address price suppression and promises to address other issues in future. In an encouraging sign, Exelon Corporation cited positive regional reforms in deferring decisions on the potential closing of its Clinton nuclear station in Illinois and the Ginna nuclear station in New York.” Late last year Entergy Corporation said it would close its Pilgrim-1 and Fitzpatrick reactors because of poor economic conditions for nuclear.

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