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Beijing, China

Yang M.,Shanghai Aircraft Manufacturing Co | Sun Z.,Shanghai Aircraft Manufacturing Co | Ma R.,Shanghai Aircraft Manufacturing Co | Meng Q.,China Center | Chen J.,Shanghai Aircraft Manufacturing Co
Cailiao Kexue yu Gongyi/Material Science and Technology | Year: 2014

In this paper, the microstructure and precipitation phase evolution of friction stir welding butt joint were investigated, for the Al-Li-Cu-Mg-based aluminum-lithium alloy 2060. The cross section of Friction stir welding butt joint could be divided into four distinctive regions: base metal zone, heat-affected zone, thermal mechanically affected zone and weld nugget zone. The microstructure of the base metal consisted of bidirectional slat, large numbers of triangular AlCu2Mn compound precipitated from α lath, which would disappear when subjected to heat action in other zones. The heat-affected zone showed coarse crystal particles, and grain morphology was changed under the action of mechanical force in the thermal mechanically affected zone, stretched at the advancing side and compressed at the retreating side. The weld nugget zone was equiaxed grain structure, the high temperature precipitated phase AlxCuxMn distributed throughout the joint region uniformly. The highest microhardness existed in the base metal zone, and the lowest value was located in the heat-affected zone, with the weld nugget zone steadying at 115 HV, a little lower than the base metal. Source


News Article
Site: http://www.reuters.com

Residents on their bicycles and electric bikes wait for the traffic at an intersection amid heavy smog in Shijiazhuang, Hebei province, China, December 10, 2015. Picture taken December 10, 2015. A researcher works at impurity analysis laboratory of the Center of Excellence on Nuclear Security in the State Nuclear Security Technology Center in Beijing, China, March 18, 2016. A researcher works at unattended and remote monitoring laboratory of the Center of Excellence on Nuclear Security in the State Nuclear Security Technology Center in Beijing, China, March 18, 2016. Researchers are seen behind water drops on a glass wall at water test laboratory of the Center of Excellence on Nuclear Security in the State Nuclear Security Technology Center in Beijing, China, March 18, 2016. A researcher walks past the Digital Cerenkov Viewing Device at the analytical laboratory of the Center of Excellence on Nuclear Security in the State Nuclear Security Technology Center in Beijing, China, March 18, 2016. A researcher works at y-Ray analysis laboratory of the Center of Excellence on Nuclear Security in the State Nuclear Security Technology Center in Beijing, China, March 18, 2016. A researcher works at a laboratory to analyze samples containing low levels of fissionable isotopes at the Center of Excellence on Nuclear Security in the State Nuclear Security Technology Center in Beijing, China, March 18, 2016. Workers demonstrate a perimeter intrusion detection and assessment system at the exhibition hall of the Center of Excellence on Nuclear Security in the State Nuclear Security Technology Center in Beijing, China, March 18, 2016. A security guard stands in front of the gate of the Center of Excellence on Nuclear Security in the State Nuclear Security Technology Center in Beijing, China, March 18, 2016. Hebei is home to seven of China's ten smoggiest cities. Under pressure to use cleaner energy sources, the province has already pledged to cut its consumption of polluting coal by 40 million tonnes over 2013-2017. "For the integrated development of the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region, we are currently planning to build a nuclear plant on the Hebei coast," Xu Dazhe, chairman of the China Atomic Energy Authority, said at the launch of a China-U.S. nuclear safety research facility on the outskirts of Beijing. He said the smog that had descended on Beijing this week was a reminder of the need to develop nuclear energy, which is also set to play a big role in meeting China's pledge to bring its greenhouse gas emissions to a peak by around 2030. One of China's biggest state reactor builders has said the country's total installed nuclear capacity could rise to 120-150 gigawatts (GW) by 2030 from 28.3 GW in 2015. The increase would require the completion of 8-10 new reactors every year until the end of the next decade. With all the country's existing reactors clustered in coastal regions, Xu said China continued to look into the possibility of building plants in the interior, adding that safety was the priority. China has never experienced a serious nuclear accident, but it acknowledges its regulatory and emergency response capabilities remain insufficient. It is currently drawing up new atomic energy and nuclear safety laws and training up hundreds of staff in order to meet the gap. Xu said the challenges remain huge but that the central government has already invested "billions of yuan" to boost security at existing plants. Among new projects, China is focusing on safer "third-generation" reactor designs, including its homegrown Hualong 1 technology that will be promoted overseas in line with Beijing efforts to become a globally dominant player in the sector. Chinese president Xi Jinping will join global leaders in Washington at the end of March to discuss issues such as nuclear proliferation and terrorism at an annual global security summit. "I am very confident that President Xi and President Obama are going to talk about the appetite that both of our countries have to continue our cooperation," said U.S. energy secretary Moniz, who attended the ceremony to launch the China Center of Excellence on Nuclear Security in Beijing on Friday. The China-U.S. facility will conduct research and share best practices on issues like securing hazardous nuclear materials and protecting reactors from attacks.


News Article | August 25, 2016
Site: http://cleantechnica.com

Fresh air is missing as a core part of life in areas of China. Instead, air that creates illness and hastens death is dominant. China is not alone in terms of air pollution and water pollution. (See this story or this one on the EU and this one on the US, for example.) As a case of how bad it can get, however, China is a frightening example. The problems with air pollution in China are actually global problems, as it spreads across countries and even oceans. School children wear or need to wear masks. Fashionably masked women incorporate masks into their wardrobes. For years, the World Health Organization showed an air-quality score of particulate matter in China well above levels deemed safe. A new study calls for immediate attention. “The 2016 annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), found that despite efforts to limit future emissions, the number of premature deaths linked to air pollution will climb over the next two decades unless more aggressive targets are set.” Specifics came to light in Special Report 20, Burden of Disease Attributable to Coal-Burning and Other Major Sources of Air Pollution in China. It is “the first comprehensive assessment of the current and predicted burdens of disease attributable to coal-burning and other major sources of particulate matter air pollution (PM2.5) in China at the national and provincial levels.” It was supported and initiated by the Global Burden of Disease – Major Air Pollution Sources (GDB MAPS) project, an international collaboration of Tsinghua University, the Health Effects Institute, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), and the University of British Columbia. “The GBD is the largest and most comprehensive effort to date to measure epidemiological levels and trends worldwide,” said Zhou Maigeng, Deputy Director of the National Center for Chronic and Non-communicable Disease Control and Prevention of the China Center for Disease Control. Maigeng is the lead author of the GBD 2013 Chinese analysis published in the British medical journal The Lancet in October 2015. Maigeng points out, “Based on Chinese data, we found that outdoor air pollution was the 5th leading cause of premature death in China in 2013.” Business Green notes, “Under each scenario average PM 2.5 levels are expected to fall as clean technologies become more widespread. But the report also warns the impact on public health could still worsen over the coming decade.” Photo by leniners (some rights reserved) and charts via Burden Of Disease From Coal-Burning and Other Air Pollution Sources in China Small Increase In Energy Investment Could Save 3 Million Lives From Air Pollution In 2040 Road Traffic Pollution Is Significant Cause Of Childhood Asthma, Research Finds   Drive an electric car? Complete one of our short surveys for our next electric car report.   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.  


News Article | August 30, 2016
Site: http://cleantechnica.com

A recent comprehensive study has concluded that coal combustion is the single largest source of air pollution-related health impact in China, contributing to 366,000 premature deaths in China in 2013 alone. Published mid-August, the new study was led by Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, and the Health Effects Institute: Burden of Disease Attributable to Coal-Burning and Other Air Pollution Sources in China. The study, available in both Chinese and English, is said to provide “the first comprehensive assessment at national and provincial levels of current and future burdens of disease attributable to coal-burning and other major sources of particular matter air pollution.” It is also the first report of the Global Burden of Disease — Major Air Pollution Sources (GBD MAPS), a multi-year, international collaboration of Tsinghua University, HEI, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), and the University of British Columbia. “The GBD is the largest and most comprehensive effort to date to measure epidemiological levels and trends worldwide” said Zhou Maigeng, Deputy Director of the National Center for Chronic and Non-communicable Disease Control and Prevention of the China Center for Disease Control and lead author of the GBD 2013 Chinese analysis published in the British medical journal The Lancet in October 2015. “Based on Chinese data, we found that outdoor air pollution was the 5th leading cause of premature death in China in 2013.” Estimates of causes of premature death from 20 top risk factors in 2013 The new study is part of the GBD MAPS Working Group, and took advantage of enhanced satellite data and China’s ever-expanding network of air pollution monitors. The study was also the first to estimate the impact of different air pollution sources by province. “Coal-burning was the most important contributor to ambient PM2.5, causing an estimated 366,000 premature deaths in 2013,” said Professor Wang Shuxiao of Tsinghua University, a lead investigator for the study. “Industrial sources and household solid fuel combustion, from both coal and non-coal emissions, were the largest sectoral contributors to disease burden attributable to ambient PM2.5 in China, responsible for 250,000 and 177,000 premature deaths, respectively.” The study also pursued an estimate of future health burdens into 2030, based on four air pollution control and energy efficiency scenarios. Though in each of the scenarios exposure to PM2.5 will decrease, the growth of Chinese populations and their likelihood of extended lifespans will only increase the number of deaths from cardiovascular and lung diseases. Specifically, the GBD MAPS analysis forecasts as many as 1.3 million annual deaths as attributable to air pollution. “Air pollution health burdens will continue to be a challenge, but the potential for future health benefits from further control is enormous,” added Robert O’Keefe, Vice President of the Health Effects Institute.   Drive an electric car? Complete one of our short surveys for our next electric car report.   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.  


News Article
Site: http://www.nanotech-now.com/

Abstract: The first China-Iran Nanotech Matchmaking event was held at Suzhou International Exhibition Hall on 29 October 2015, as a part of the Sixth CHInano Conference and Expo in cooperation with Iran Nanotech China Center (INCC) and Nanopolis Center as the organizers of the exhibition. The organizers seek to introduce the Iranian enterprises and start cooperation between the Iranian and Chinese enterprises in the field of nanotechnology. The event was held in the presence of Iran Nanotechnology Initiative Council authorities, Nanopolis Center authorities, nine Iranian enterprises and representatives of more than 20 Chinese enterprises. In the first part of the event, Dr. Saeed Sarkar, the Secretary-General of Iran Nanotechnology Initiative Council (INIC) and Dr. Beitollahi, the Head of the International Workgroup of INIC, presented a report about nanotechnology in Iran. The second part of the event was dedicated to project promotion. In this part, 15 projects and products were introduced from Iran in the fields of nanofibers, water purification technology, biomedical, building materials, machinery and equipment by representatives for the enterprises of Exir Nano Sina, Parsa Polymer Sharif, Ariya Polymer, Payamavaran Nanofanavaran Fardanegar (PNF), Behran Filter, Fanavaran Nanomeghyas, Sevin Plasma, Adico, and Tavana Laboratorial Network. A number of meetings were carried out between the Iranian and the Chinese enterprises after the event. This event was the first activity to create cooperation between Iranian and Chinese enterprises that are active in the field of nanotechnology after the establishment of INCC. INCC was established in May 2015 by INIC, Nanopolis Center, and Suzhou Company in order to strengthen cooperation between Iran and China in the field of nanotechnology, research and development, technology transfer, exchange of references, and organization of scientific conferences. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

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