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Strauser D.R.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Wong A.W.K.,Northwestern University | O'sullivan D.,Pennsylvania State University | Wagner S.,Childrens Brain Tumor Foundation
Australian Journal of Rehabilitation Counselling | Year: 2013

The primary aim of this brief exploratory study is to examine differences in developmental work personality in a sample of young adult CNS cancer survivors and a group of young adult college students without disabilities. Participants were 43 young adults with central nervous systems cancer (females = 58.1%, Mean age = 21.64, SD = 3.64) and a comparison sample of 45 typically developing others who were college students (females = 77.3%, mean age = 20.91, SD = 1.04). They completed the Developmental Work Personality Scale (DWPS). Group differences in developmental work personality were examined using multivariate analysis of variance procedures. Results indicated that overall developmental work personality, and subscale scores of work tasks, and social skills were significantly lower among CNS cancer survivors compared to typically developing other young adults. Findings suggest influences of developmental atypicality in work personality with CNS cancer survivorship. © 2013, Cambridge University Press. All rights reserved.


Wagner S.,Childrens Brain Tumor Foundation
International Journal of Rehabilitation Research | Year: 2012

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between vocational identity, community integration, positive and negative affect, and satisfaction with life in a group of young adult central nervous system (CNS) cancer survivors. Participants in this study included 45 young adult CNS cancer survivors who ranged in age from 18 to 30 years (mean=22, SD=3.62), with a mean age at diagnosis of 8.8 years. Four standardized instruments were used to assess the individual's affect, satisfaction with life, vocational identity, and self-perceived level of community integration. Pearson correlation analyses were carried out to examine the relationships between the satisfaction with life and positive and negative affect, vocational identify, and community integration. A hierarchical linear regression was then performed to determine how well these variables predict satisfaction with life among CNS cancer survivors. Significant positive correlations were found between life satisfaction and positive affect (r=0.423, P<0.01), as well as life satisfaction and community integration (r=-505, P<0.001). A positive correlation between life satisfaction and vocational identity was only marginally significant (r=0.312, P<0.05). Regression results indicate that the model explained 29% of the variance with community integration making a unique contribution. The largest contribution of this study is that the findings provide initial evidence that addressing vocational identity and community integration may be important constructs in improving young adult CNS survivors' overall levels of satisfaction with life. These constructs have not been typically addressed in psychosocial cancer treatment programs. © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Strauser D.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Wagner S.,Childrens Brain Tumor Foundation | Wong A.W.K.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | O'Sullivan D.,Pennsylvania State University
Disability and Rehabilitation | Year: 2013

Purpose: The primary purpose of this paper is to undertake foundational research in the area of career readiness, work personality and age of onset with young adult central nervous system (CNS) survivors. Method: Participants for this study consisted of 43 individuals whose age range from 18 to 30 (M = 21.64, SD = 3.46), an average age of brain tumor onset of 9.50 years (SD = 4.73) and average years off of treatment of 7.25 years (SD = 5.80). Packets were distributed to survivors who were participating in a psychosocial cancer treatment program. Participants completed multiple career instruments and a demographic form. Differences between groups and among the variables were examined and size effect sizes were analyzed. Results: Young adult CNS survivors had significantly lower levels of work personality and career readiness when compared to young adult non-cancer survivors with CNS cancer with those between the ages of 6 and 12 reported significantly lower levels when compared to individuals diagnosed before age 6 and after the age of 13. Conclusions: Young adult CNS survivors at an increased risk for having lower levels of work personality and career readiness then a norm group comparison. Age of onset (between 6 and 12) may be at significant risk factor for developing poor or dysfunctional work and career behaviors. Implications for Rehabilitation Young adults with central nervous system (CNS) cancer are at particular risk for experiencing difficulties related to career and employment. Work personality and career readiness are two constructs that have been found to be related to one's ability to meet the demands of work. Young adult CNS cancer survivors have lower levels of work personality and career readiness. Individuals diagnosed between the ages of 6 and 12 may be at particular risk and may need specific vocational rehabilitation interventions. The results of this study point to the need for comprehensive career and vocational services for young adult CNS cancer survivors. © 2013 Informa UK, Ltd.


Lange D.D.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Wong A.W.K.,Northwestern University | Wong A.W.K.,Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago | Strauser D.R.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Wagner S.,Childrens Brain Tumor Foundation
International Journal of Rehabilitation Research | Year: 2014

The aims of this study were as follows: (a) to compare levels of career thoughts and vocational identity between young adult childhood central nervous system (CNS) cancer survivors and noncancer peers and (b) to investigate the contribution of vocational identity and affect on career thoughts among cancer survivors. Participants included 45 young adult CNS cancer survivors and a comparison sample of 60 college students. Participants completed Career Thoughts Inventory, My Vocational Situation, and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule. Multivariate analysis of variance and multiple regression analysis were used to analyze the data in this study. CNS cancer survivors had a higher level of decision-making confusion than the college students. Multiple regression analysis indicated that vocational identity and positive affect significantly predicted the career thoughts of CNS survivors. The differences in decision-making confusion suggest that young adult CNS survivors would benefit from interventions that focus on providing knowledge of how to make decisions, while increasing vocational identity and positive affect for this specific population could also be beneficial. © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

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