Mercy Childrens Hospital and Clinics

Des Moines, IA, United States

Mercy Childrens Hospital and Clinics

Des Moines, IA, United States
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Rumman N.,Medical College of Wisconsin | Rumman N.,Makassed Hospital | Sultan M.,The Childrens Hospital of Wisconsin | Sultan M.,Makassed Hospital | And 7 more authors.
BMC Pediatrics | Year: 2014

Background: There is increasing evidence that intestinal inflammation plays a major role in gastrointestinal symptoms in cystic fibrosis (CF). Fecal calprotectin is a marker that is elevated in several gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases, but little is known about its value in CF. We aimed to look for associations of elevated fecal calprotectin among CF patients and whether its level correlates with the clinical manifestations of CF.Methods: A single stool specimen was collected from 62 patients with CF. Fecal calprotectin was measured using the commercially available ELISA kits (PhiCal™ test). Clinical data were collected from patients' records and CF registry.Results: There were no significant differences between CF patients with normal and abnormal fecal calprotectin levels. However, patients who were not receiving inhaled antibiotics had higher fecal calprotectin levels than those who were.Conclusion: Elevated fecal calprotectin may not accurately predict intestinal inflammation in CF. However, the fact that it was elevated in both pancreatic sufficient and insufficient groups supports the concept of " cystic fibrosis enteropathy" regardless of the pancreatic status. © 2014 Rumman et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Maurice S.M.,Center for Craniofacial and Childrens Reconstructive Surgery | Maurice S.M.,Mercy Childrens Hospital and Clinics | Gachiani J.M.,Mercy Childrens Hospital and Clinics | Gachiani J.M.,Mercy Medical Center
Journal of Craniofacial Surgery | Year: 2014

Posterior cranial vault distraction is recognized as a viable initial approach to patients with syndromic craniosynostosis. It offers advantages to initial anterior vault surgery and to traditional 1-stage advancements. Reports of posterior vault distraction have thus far focused on the use of standard titanium distractors. We present a case of posterior vault distraction with resorbable distraction devices, obviating the need for a second surgery and anesthetic for distractor removal. Distraction was performed successfully without complications or device-related issues. © 2014 Mutaz B. Habal, MD.

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