Childrens Hospital of Kaifeng

Henan’an, China

Childrens Hospital of Kaifeng

Henan’an, China
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Bai W.,Peking University | Han Z.,Childrens Hospital Of Kaifeng | Chen S.,Surgery Academy | Li H.,Peking University | And 9 more authors.
Pediatric Cardiology | Year: 2017

This study was designed to analyse the serum resistin level in children with postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) and its clinical significance. Twenty-one children with POTS and 31 healthy children as controls participated in the study. Clinical characteristics, heart rate and blood pressure in the supine and upright positions were monitored and collected during an upright test, and the symptom scoring of POTS patients was recorded. The serum resistin levels of patients in both groups were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The change in serum resistin levels in the POTS group before and after standing, as well as its correlation with symptom scores and change in heart rate after standing, was analysed. Compared with the control group, the serum resistin levels in the POTS group were significantly increased (P < 0.01). The serum resistin levels in the POTS group before and after standing did not differ (P > 0.05). There was a negative correlation between the serum resistin levels and a change in heart rate from the supine to upright position (correlation coefficient = −0.615, P < 0.01). Moreover, serum resistin levels were negatively correlated with symptom scores (correlation coefficient = −0.493, P < 0.05). Serum resistin levels in children with POTS were significantly higher than those in healthy children and negatively correlated with a change in heart rate from the supine to upright position and symptom scores. These results suggest a protective role of increased resistin in the pathogenesis of POTS. © 2017 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC


Lin J.,Peking University | Han Z.,Childrens Hospital of Kaifeng | Li X.,Peking University | Zhao J.,Peking University | And 9 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

Background: Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is prevalent in children and adolescents and has a great impact on health. But its risk factors have not been fully understood. This study aimed to explore possible risk factors for children and adolescents with POTS.Methods and Findings: 600 children and adolescents (test group) aged 7-18 (11.9±3.0) years old, 259 males and 341 females, were recruited for identifying its risk factors. Another 197 subjects aged from 7 to 18 (11.3±2.3) years old were enrolled in the validation group. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were monitored during upright test. Risk factors were analyzed and sensitivity and specificity for predicting POTS were tested via receiver operating characteristic curve. Among 600 subjects, 41 were confirmed with POTS patients (6.8%) based on clinical manifestation and upright test. The results showed a significant difference in daily water intake, the daily sleeping hours, supine HR, HR increment and maximum HR during upright test between POTS and the unaffected children (P<0.05). Likelihood of POTS would increase by 1.583 times if supine HR was increased by 10 beats/min (95%CI 1.184 to 2.116, P<0.01), by 3.877 times if a child's water intake was less than 800 ml/day (95%CI 1.937 to 7.760, P<0.001), or by 5.905 times (95%CI 2.972 to 11.733, P<0.001) if sleeping hours were less than 8 hours/day. Supine HR, daily water intake and sleeping hours showed the capability of predicting POTS in children and adolescents with an AUC of 83.9% (95% CI: 78.6%-89.1%), sensitivity of 80.5% and specificity of 75%. Furthermore, in validation group, predictive sensitivity and specificity were 73.3% and 72.5%.Conclusion: Faster supine HR, less water intake and shorter sleeping hours were identified as risk factors for POTS. © 2014 Lin et al.


Song S.,Chongqing Medical University | Hu Y.,Chongqing Medical University | Gu X.,Chongqing Medical University | Gu X.,Childrens Hospital of Kaifeng | And 2 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

Background: Kernicterus still occurs around the world; however, the mechanism of bilirubin neurotoxicity remains unclear, and effective treatment strategies are lacking. To solve these problems, several kernicterus (or acute bilirubin encephalopathy) animal models have been established, but these models are difficult and expensive. Therefore, the present study was performed to establish a novel kernicterus model that is simple and affordable by injecting unconjugated bilirubin solution into the cisterna magna (CM) of ordinary newborn Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Methods: On postnatal day 5, SD rat pups were randomly divided into bilirubin and control groups. Then, either bilirubin solution or ddH2O (pH = 8.5) was injected into the CM at 10 μg/g (bodyweight). For model characterization, neurobehavioral outcomes were observed, mortality was calculated, and bodyweight was recorded after bilirubin injection and weaning. Apoptosis in the hippocampus was detected by H&E staining, TUNEL, flow cytometry and Western blotting. When the rats were 28 days old, learning and memory ability were evaluated using the Morris water maze test. Results: The bilirubin-treated rats showed apparently abnormal neurological manifestations, such as clenched fists, opisthotonos and torsion spasms. Bodyweight gain in the bilirubin-treated rats was significantly lower than that in the controls (P<0.001). The early and late mortality of the bilirubin-treated rats were both dramatically higher than those of the controls (P = 0.004 and 0.017, respectively). Apoptosis and necrosis in the hippocampal nerve cells in the bilirubin-treated rats were observed. The bilirubin-treated rats performed worse than the controls on the Morris water maze test. Conclusion: By injecting bilirubin into the CM, we successfully created a new kernicterus model using ordinary SD rats; the model mimics both the acute clinical manifestations and the chronic sequelae. In particular, CM injection is easy to perform; thus, more stable models for follow-up study are available. © 2014 Song et al.

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