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Colley R.C.,Childrens Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute
Health reports / Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Health Information = Rapports sur la santé / Statistique Canada, Centre canadien d'information sur la santé | Year: 2012

The accurate measurement of time devoted to physical activity, sedentary pursuits and sleep is difficult and varies considerably between surveys. This has implications for population surveillance and understanding how these variables relate to health. This sample of children (n = 878) was from the 2007 to 2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey. Moderate- to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), sedentary behaviour and sleep duration were assessed using both a questionnaire and an accelerometer. This article compared parent-reported and directly measured physical activity, sedentary behaviour and sleep, and examined their associations, alone or in combination, with selected health markers in children aged 6 to 11. According to parent reports, the children in this study had an average of 105 minutes of MVPA, 2.5 hours of screen time and 9.7 hours of sleep per day; accelerometers recorded 63 minutes of MVPA, 7.6 hours of sedentary time and 10.1 hours of sleep per day. MVPA, measured by parent-report or accelerometry, was significantly associated with body mass index. In a regression model, directly measured MVPA and sleep were significantly associated with body mass index, and directly measured MVPA was significantly associated with waist circumference. Parent-reported screen time approached a significant association with body mass index. Time estimates and associations with health markers varied between parent-reported and directly measured physical activity, sedentary behaviour and sleep in children. These differences are important to understand before the two measurement techniques can be used interchangeably in research and health surveillance. Source


Colley R.C.,Childrens Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute | Garriguet D.,Health Analysis Division | Janssen I.,Queens University | Craig C.L.,Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute | And 2 more authors.
Health Reports | Year: 2011

Background Rising obesity rates and declining fitness levels have increased interest in understanding what underlies these trends. This article presents the first directly measured data on physical activity and sedentary behaviour on a nationally representative sample of Canadians aged 20 to 79 years. Data and methods Data are from the 2007 to 2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS). Physical activity was measured using accelerometry. Data are presented as time spent in sedentary, light, moderate and vigorous intensity movement as well as steps accumulated per day. Results An estimated 15% of Canadian adults accumulate 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per week; 5% accumulate 150 minutes per week as at least 30 minutes of MVPA on 5 or more days a week. Men are more active than women and MVPA declines with increasing age and adiposity. Canadian adults are sedentary for approximately 9.5 hours per day (69% of waking hours). Men accumulate an average of 9,500 steps per day and women, 8,400 steps per day. The 10,000-steps-perday target is achieved by 35% of adults. Interpretation Before the CHMS, objective measures of physical activity and sedentary behaviour were not available for a representative sample of Canadians. The findings indicate that 85% of adults are not active enough to meet Canada's new physical activity recommendation. Source


Colley R.C.,Childrens Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute | Garriguet D.,Health Analysis Division | Janssen I.,Queens University | Craig C.L.,Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute | And 2 more authors.
Health Reports | Year: 2011

Background Physical activity is an important determinant of health and fi tness. This study provides contemporary estimates of the physical activity levels of Canadians aged 6 to 19 years. Data and methods Data are from the 2007 to 2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey. The physical activity of a nationally representative sample was measured using accelerometers. Data are presented as time spent in sedentary, light, moderate and vigorous intensity movement, and in steps accumulated per day. Results An estimated 9% of boys and 4% of girls accumulate 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity on at least 6 days a week. Regardless of age group, boys are more active than girls. Canadian children and youth spend 8.6 hours per day-62% of their waking hours-in sedentary pursuits. Daily step counts average 12,100 for boys and 10,300 for girls. Interpretation Based on objective and robust measures, physical activity levels of Canadian children and youth are low. Source


Reeks C.,Childrens Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute | Screaton R.A.,Sunnybrook Research Institute
Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE | Year: 2015

We have developed a screening platform to identify dedicated human protein kinases for phosphorylated substrates which can be used to elucidate novel signal transduction pathways. Our approach features the use of a library of purified GST-tagged human protein kinases and a recombinant protein substrate of interest. We have used this technology to identify MAP/microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 2 (MARK2) as the kinase for a glucose-regulated site on CREB-Regulated Transcriptional Coactivator 2 (CRTC2), a protein required for beta cell proliferation, as well as the Axl family of tyrosine kinases as regulators of cell metastasis by phosphorylation of the adaptor protein ELMO. We describe this technology and discuss how it can help to establish a comprehensive map of how cells respond to environmental stimuli. Source


Garriguet D.,Ottawa | Colley R.C.,Childrens Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute
Health Reports | Year: 2012

The 2007 to 2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) collected directly measured physical activity on seven consecutive days for a representative sample of the population aged 6 to 79. Based on the CHMS, half of the active minutes in a day are accumulated between 11:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. For children, the most active period is lunch-time (11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.), and for teenagers aged 15 to 19, the after-school period (3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.). Children and youth are more active on weekdays than on weekends. Active children and youth tend to accumulate more minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity after school, whereas active adults do so at lunch time. Source

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