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Roux K.J.,Childrens Health Research Center | Roux K.J.,University of South Dakota
Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences | Year: 2013

Various methods have been established for the purpose of identifying and characterizing protein-protein interactions (PPIs). This diverse toolbox provides researchers with options to overcome challenges specific to the nature of the proteins under investigation. Among these techniques is a category based on proximity-dependent labeling of proteins in living cells. These can be further partitioned into either hypothesis-based or unbiased screening methods, each with its own advantages and limitations. Approaches in which proteins of interest are fused to either modifying enzymes or receptor sequences allow for hypothesis-based testing of protein proximity. Protein crosslinking and BioID (proximity-dependent biotin identification) permit unbiased screening of protein proximity for a protein of interest. Here, we evaluate these approaches and their applications in living eukaryotic cells. © 2013 Springer Basel. Source


Li L.,Childrens Health Research Center
Nature Cell Biology | Year: 2016

Aberrant Notch signalling has been linked to many cancers including choroid plexus (CP) tumours, a group of rare and predominantly paediatric brain neoplasms. We developed animal models of CP tumours, by inducing sustained expression of Notch1, that recapitulate properties of human CP tumours with aberrant NOTCH signalling. Whole-transcriptome and functional analyses showed that tumour cell proliferation is associated with Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) in the tumour microenvironment. Unlike CP epithelial cells, which have multiple primary cilia, tumour cells possess a solitary primary cilium as a result of Notch-mediated suppression of multiciliate differentiation. A Shh-driven signalling cascade in the primary cilium occurs in tumour cells but not in epithelial cells. Lineage studies show that CP tumours arise from monociliated progenitors in the roof plate characterized by elevated Notch signalling. Abnormal SHH signalling and distinct ciliogenesis are detected in human CP tumours, suggesting the SHH pathway and cilia differentiation as potential therapeutic avenues. © 2016 Nature Publishing Group Source


Morriswood B.,Medical University of Vienna | Havlicek K.,Medical University of Vienna | Demmel L.,Medical University of Vienna | Yavuz S.,Medical University of Vienna | And 8 more authors.
Eukaryotic Cell | Year: 2013

The trypanosomes are a family of parasitic protists of which the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, is the best characterized. The complex and highly ordered cytoskeleton of T. brucei has been shown to play vital roles in its biology but remains difficult to study, in large part owing to the intractability of its constituent proteins. Existing methods of protein identification, such as bioinformatic analysis, generation of monoclonal antibody panels, proteomics, affinity purification, and yeast two-hybrid screens, all have drawbacks. Such deficiencies-troublesome proteins and technical limitations-are common not only to T. brucei but also to many other protists, many of which are even less well studied. Proximity-dependent biotin identification (BioID) is a recently developed technique that allows forward screens for interaction partners and near neighbors in a native environment with no requirement for solubility in nonionic detergent. As such, it is extremely well suited to the exploration of the cytoskeleton. In this project, BioID was adapted for use in T. brucei. The trypanosome bilobe, a discrete cytoskeletal structure with few known protein components, represented an excellent test subject. Use of the bilobe protein TbMORN1 as a probe resulted in the identification of seven new bilobe constituents and two new flagellum attachment zone proteins. This constitutes the first usage of BioID on a largely uncharacterized structure, and demonstrates its utility in identifying new components of such a structure. This remarkable success validates BioID as a new tool for the study of unicellular eukaryotes in particular and the eukaryotic cytoskeleton in general. © 2013, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. Source


Roux K.J.,Childrens Health Research Center | Roux K.J.,University of South Dakota | Kim D.I.,Childrens Health Research Center | Burke B.,Singapore Institute of Medical Biology
Current Protocols in Protein Science | Year: 2013

BioID is a unique method to screen for physiologically relevant protein interactions that occur in living cells. This technique harnesses a promiscuous biotin ligase to biotinylate proteins based on proximity. The ligase is fused to a protein of interest and expressed in cells, where it biotinylates proximal endogenous proteins. Because it is a rare protein modification in nature, biotinylation of these endogenous proteins by BioID fusion proteins enables their selective isolation and identification with standard biotin-affinity capture. Proteins identified by BioID are candidate interactors for the protein of interest. BioID can be applied to insoluble proteins, can identify weak and/or transient interactions, and is amenable to temporal regulation. Initially applied to mammalian cells, BioID has potential application in a variety of cell types from diverse species. © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Source


Roux K.J.,Childrens Health Research Center
Current protocols in protein science / editorial board, John E. Coligan ... [et al.] | Year: 2013

BioID is a unique method to screen for physiologically relevant protein interactions that occur in living cells. This technique harnesses a promiscuous biotin ligase to biotinylate proteins based on proximity. The ligase is fused to a protein of interest and expressed in cells, where it biotinylates proximal endogenous proteins. Because it is a rare protein modification in nature, biotinylation of these endogenous proteins by BioID fusion proteins enables their selective isolation and identification with standard biotin-affinity capture. Proteins identified by BioID are candidate interactors for the protein of interest. BioID can be applied to insoluble proteins, can identify weak and/or transient interactions, and is amenable to temporal regulation. Initially applied to mammalian cells, BioID has potential application in a variety of cell types from diverse species. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Source

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