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News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Children’s Mercy partnered with custom app developer Engage Mobile Solutions to create CMPeDS: Pediatric Decision Support. This new software helps pediatricians and emergency services professionals diagnose and treat children facing acute illnesses and injuries. Dr. Russell J. McCulloh, an infectious diseases physician from Children’s Mercy, will present the app at the Pediatric Academic Societies’ (PAS) annual meeting on May 9th 2017. “CMPeDS, which stands for Children’s Mercy Pediatric Decision Support, is a mobile device-based application that provides healthcare providers with evidence-based guidelines to manage children who are facing acute illness,” Dr. McCulloh said. “This can include infants with possible severe infections, or children who are experiencing acute injuries, burns, or other acute illnesses.” The application provides pediatricians with a variety of tools for diagnosis and treatment, including checklists for assessing patients’ risk of severe illness, step-by-step recommendations and decision trees, and treatment algorithms derived from national recommendations and expert opinions. The PAS annual meeting, which takes place this year from May 6-9, is the largest pediatric research conference in the world. It provides a forum for the presentation and discussion of cutting-edge research in a variety of pediatric subfields. This year’s conference is expected to attract over 7500 attendees, host over 600 scientific sessions, and feature over 125 exhibiting companies. Dr. McCulloh will present the results from the first several months of CMPeDS’s deployment, including the application’s number of users, impact on patient care, and user demographics. “The impact of CMPeDS has been really phenomenal,” said Dr. McCulloh. “We’ve had more than 6,000 users download the application… they’re not just downloading it but they’re using it and really engaging with the application.” Engage Mobile Solutions collaborated with Children’s Mercy to develop and refine CMPeDS. “It is a privilege to work with Children’s Mercy on help create innovations in pediatric healthcare,” said Matthew Barksdale, president of Engage Mobile. “We believe the positive impact of this application could be enormous.” Dr. McCulloh’s poster presentation at PAS will take place on Tuesday May 9th in San Francisco, CA. “Healthcare providers feel like they’re making better decisions with the help of this application,” Dr. McCulloh said. “We are changing practice and that practice is meaningfully improved, which means that we are really positively impacting the lives of children.” About Children’s Mercy Kansas City Founded in 1897, Children’s Mercy is one of the nation’s top pediatric medical centers. With not-for-profit hospitals in Missouri and Kansas, and numerous specialty clinics in both states, Children’s Mercy provides the highest level of care for children from birth through the age of 21. U.S. News & World Report has repeatedly ranked Children’s Mercy as one of “America's Best Children's Hospitals.” For the fourth time in a row, Children’s Mercy has achieved Magnet nursing designation, awarded to fewer than seven percent of all hospitals nationally, for excellence in quality care. Its faculty of more than 700 pediatric subspecialists and researchers across more than 40 subspecialties are actively involved in clinical care, pediatric research, and educating the next generation of pediatric subspecialists. Thanks to generous philanthropic and volunteer support, Children’s Mercy provides medical care to every child who passes through its doors, regardless of a family’s ability to pay. For more information about Children’s Mercy and its research, visit childrensmercy.org. About Engage Mobile Solutions Engage Mobile builds custom health and enterprise strategy and software solutions that leverage mobile and cloud technologies to solve unique business challenges. The company was named one of the “Most Promising Enterprise Mobility Companies in the United states” by CIO Review, chosen as one of the “Top Companies in Kansas City with Under 25 Employees” by Thinking Bigger Business Media, and was selected a finalist for the Appy Awards by MediaPost Communications. For more information about Engage Mobile Solutions, visit http://www.engagemobile.com or contact Matthew Barksdale at mbarksdale(at)engagemobile(dot)com.


Douglas C. Wallace, PhD, a world-renowned pioneer in mitochondrial biology at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), received the 2017 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Life Science on May 4 at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia. A highly esteemed international award established by the Institute in 1824, the Franklin Medal has celebrated such luminaries as Albert Einstein, Thomas Edison, Marie Curie, Stephen Hawking, Nikola Tesla and Bill Gates. Over 100 of the Franklin Medal laureates have also received Nobel Prizes in scientific fields. Dr. Wallace has achieved international prominence as the founder of mitochondrial genetics. Mitochondria are tiny structures within cells that produce 90 percent of our energy, playing essential roles in health and disease. Dr. Wallace's groundbreaking research in the 1970s defined the genetics of DNA within the mitochondria, as distinct from DNA in a cell's nucleus. His studies have reconstructed patterns of human evolution and worldwide migrations over hundreds of millennia. His investigations into the role of mitochondrial DNA mutations in human disease are an important component of CHOP's recently launched Roberts Collaborative for Genetics and Individualized Medicine. "We are extremely proud that the Franklin Institute has honored Dr. Wallace's extraordinary contributions to biology and medicine, and are delighted to see him ranked in such distinguished scientific company," said Bryan Wolf, MD, PhD, executive Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute. The award citation accompanying the Medal acknowledged Dr. Wallace's achievements in showing the profound role of mutated mitochondrial DNA in complex diseases, "thereby leading the way to therapies for those diseases and aging." The Franklin Institute produced a brief video of Dr. Wallace highlighting his work. An Awards Ceremony and dinner last Thursday featured presentation of Franklin Medals to Dr. Wallace and other laureates, honored for accomplishments in chemistry, physics, electrical engineering, computer and cognitive science, and materials science. Another scientist recognized at the ceremony was French glaciologist and climate change pioneer Dr. Claude Lorius, winner of the Bower Award for Achievement in Science. At a weeklong series of programs in conjunction with the Awards, Dr. Wallace taught hands-on science activities to local students in the Laureates' Laboratory at the Franklin Institute, participated in a public panel discussion of scientific breakthroughs with fellow laureates, and delivered a lecture on "Human Origins and Complex Diseases" at a Life Science Symposium on mitochondrial medicine at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. About Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia was founded in 1855 as the nation's first pediatric hospital. Through its long-standing commitment to providing exceptional patient care, training new generations of pediatric healthcare professionals, and pioneering major research initiatives, Children's Hospital has fostered many discoveries that have benefited children worldwide. Its pediatric research program is among the largest in the country. In addition, its unique family-centered care and public service programs have brought the 546-bed hospital recognition as a leading advocate for children and adolescents. For more information, visit http://www.


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Researchers from the Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases at Children's Hospital Los Angeles examined the mechanisms of B cell immune reconstitution in pediatric patients who had undergone bone marrow transplantation and discovered a disruption in the maturation of B cells - critical to the immune system - preventing the production of antibodies that fight infection. The results of the study were published in the journal Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation on May 12. "In order to be fully functional, B cells must go through different stages of maturation. We found that in pediatric patients after transplant, the B cell formation reaches a certain point, but then stops and is unable to progress to complete maturation and remains unable to fight infection, we further dissected the factors that affect various B cell maturation stages" said the lead author Hisham Abdel-Azim, MD, MS, of the Division of Hematology, Oncology and Blood and Marrow Transplantation at CHLA. The research team is the first to provide a conceptual model for B cell development and to determine the exact point at which disruption of B cell maturation occurs leading to impaired immune reconstitution. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is the only potentially curative therapy for a wide range of malignant diseases such as leukemia and non-malignant diseases including aplastic anemia, thalassemia and sickle cell disease. Part of the preparation for BMT may involve total body irradiation or immune therapy, wiping out the patient's immune system, making them vulnerable to serious infection. If the immune system does not fully recover, the patient can get very sick and catch fatal infections. Rebuilding the immune system following transplantation is critical because it is a key factor in helping patients fight infection. Previous studies investigating immune reconstitution following transplantation have focused primarily on T cells. "We found that even with full T cell recovery, children after BMT have impaired antibody immune reconstitution," added Abdel-Azim, who is also an associate professor of pediatrics at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California. Rather than looking at patient response over the course of only 6 months or one year, the research team evaluated patients for 10 years after transplant. The study demonstrated a problem in the B cell immune reconstitution in children involving a disruption in the maturation of a specific type of B cell called IgM memory B cell -- which is independent of T cell recovery and leads directly leads to an impairment of antibody immune reconstitution post-transplant. "We now know that we need to monitor those patients closely and specifically look into B cell reconstitution so that we can tailor prophylaxis after transplant and the immunization schedule depending on their response," said Abdel-Azim. Other contributors include Amro Elshoury,MD, Kris M. Mahadeo, MD , Robertson Parkman, MD, and Neena Kapoor, MD of the Division of Hematology, Oncology, and Blood and Marrow Transplantation at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine. Children's Hospital Los Angeles has been named the best children's hospital in California and among the top 10 in the nation for clinical excellence with its selection to the prestigious U.S. News & World Report Honor Roll. Children's Hospital is home to The Saban Research Institute, one of the largest and most productive pediatric research facilities in the United States. Children's Hospital is also one of America's premier teaching hospitals through its affiliation since 1932 with the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California. For more information, visit CHLA.org. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and LinkedIn, or visit our blog at http://researchlablog. .


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Adolescent males of color treated for violent injury and discharged from an urban pediatric emergency department (ED) overwhelmingly identified a need for mental health care, according to research from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP)'s Violence Intervention Program (VIP), published today in the Journal of Adolescent Health. "We know that it is vitally important to listen to the voices and needs of youth," said lead study author Rachel Myers, PhD, research scientist at CHOP. "This work highlights how adolescent males receiving care in the ED with what may be physically minor injuries are suffering significant trauma. We also know that with real support, young people are resilient, go back to school, and go on to graduate and pursue their goals." The study examined data from 49 adolescent males who were treated at CHOP's ED between January 2012 and August 2016 after suffering a violence-related injury, typically from peer assaults, and elected to enroll in VIP. Participants, predominantly young men of color between the ages of 12 and 17 years old, identified their needs and goals for recovery at intake and during the course of their participation in case management. At intake to the CHOP VIP, nearly two-thirds of the adolescents reported significant traumatic stress symptoms. Most (75 percent) of the injuries were non-penetrating. Nearly 90 percent of participants felt they needed mental health services, including therapy and suicide counseling. More than half (60 percent) said they needed legal help, including obtaining police reports. About half (56 percent) also identified a need for psychosocial support, and said they would attend peer group sessions with other injured youth. Adolescent males treated and discharged from the ED were significantly more likely to identify safety needs, such as addressing peer relationships in school and community, as compared to those admitted to the hospital, who may have experienced more serious injuries. "Assault victims describe feeling constantly tense and 'on guard,' and having nightmares or unwanted flashbacks of the assault. Unfortunately, many youth also begin to avoid talking about the event or avoiding the places or people that remind them of the assault-- school, friends, normal adolescent activities," said Myers. "It shows us that just treating the external wounds is not enough. Young men not only need, but want help to cope with their fears and difficult emotions in the aftermath of injury." The researchers say they are seeing more violently-injured youth in CHOP's ED each year, with 150 youths since January 1 who would qualify for VIP's direct case work. These services include comprehensive assessment, support navigating services such as medical, legal, and education, peer-facilitated group therapy, and trauma-informed mental health therapy. Recovery goals are developed in partnership with youth and their families, respecting youths' voice and choice. VIP utilizes resources provided by CHOP's Violence Prevention Initiative, an evidence-based effort to protect youth from violence and promote healing. Learn more at http://www. . About Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia was founded in 1855 as the nation's first pediatric hospital. Through its long-standing commitment to providing exceptional patient care, training new generations of pediatric healthcare professionals and pioneering major research initiatives, Children's Hospital has fostered many discoveries that have benefited children worldwide. Its pediatric research program is among the largest in the country. In addition, its unique family-centered care and public service programs have brought the 546-bed hospital recognition as a leading advocate for children and adolescents. For more information, visit http://www. .


San Jose, CA, May 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Imagine that for the past 44 years your favorite peeps included a cookie monster, a grouch who lived in a garbage can, a giant yellow bird, and a green frog named Kermit. Welcome to Sonia Manzano’s neighborhood when she was best known as Maria on Sesame Street. The award-winning children’s television writer, actor and author is being honored with the Legacy for Children Award 2017 by Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose for her contributions to early childhood education. The annual fundraising gala will honor Manzano with this prestigious award on May 19, at 6 p.m. at the McEnery Convention Center. Sonia Manzano was a pioneering trailblazer as one of television’s first leading Latina women at the forefront of a media revolution when public broadcasting took a chance with Sesame Street. The now legendary program was a game changer for PBS. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Corporation of Public Broadcasting that spawned PBS and Sesame Street, which proved that if done well children’s programming could be educational, especially for inner city children – a target audience early on. Manzano’s groundbreaking and popular contributions to national television have defined her as an influential role model and helped generations of young people aspire and dream beyond their own neighborhoods. “Sonia’s remarkable ability to help children develop social and emotional skills like empathy, compassion and acceptance resonates with the museum’s goals and values as an education center,” said Marilee Jennings, executive director of Children’s Discovery Museum. “Current research shows these soft skills are determinant in children’s future success. Sonia’s work in early childhood education has changed the lives of generations of children and parents and I’m honored to recognize her with the Legacy award.” Over the years, Sesame Street tackled many sensitive topics from death and incarceration to child abuse. As a trusted adult, one of Manzano’s greatest contributions as Maria was helping children better understand themselves and the world. As a result, Manzano had a profound effect on millions of children who tuned into Sesame Street every day to find a familiar neighborhood and a safe place with Maria. Manzano has won numerous awards for her writing, acting, and advocacy work for children, including 15 Emmy Awards as a writer for Sesame Street and the distinguished 2016 Daytime Emmy Lifetime Achievement Award. She received the Congressional Hispanic Caucus award, the Bronx Hall of Fame award and the Hispanic Heritage Award for Education. She’s authored four children’s picture books; her most recent is The Lowdown on the High Bridge, published by the Bronx Children’s Museum, A Box Full of Kittens, No Dogs Allowed!, and Miracle on 133rd Street as well as two books for young adults, The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano, and Becoming Maria: Love and Chaos in the South Bronx (her memoir). The Legacy for Children Award is presented annually in recognition of an individual or organization dedicated to advancing the lives and learning of children. Proceeds from the Legacy for Children Award event supports the museum’s hands-on educational exhibits, in-depth programming, and cultural events, all of which have a strong emphasis on diversity and inclusion, designed to give our community’s children the tools that will help them develop into the talented, creative and diverse workforce of tomorrow. For more information on Sonia Manzano, click here. With over 150 interactive exhibits and programs, Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose is one of the largest museums of its kind in the nation. Since opening its doors in 1990, the museum has welcomed over 8.3 million visitors and has offered new exhibits each year that respond to children's diverse educational needs. The striking 52,000 square foot purple building was designed by Mexico City-based architect Ricardo Legorreta and is a beacon of discovery. Encompassing the broad themes of community, connections and creativity, hands-on exhibits invite self-directed, open-ended explorations.  For more information about the Museum, visit www.cdm.org. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/98231aec-307d-4a16-92c7-d86dbd5980bc A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/f81a11a8-37c8-4588-b453-364680da50b1 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/cb92b7f6-1058-4172-b3c3-c65ae0bef3a2


San Jose, CA, May 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Imagine that for the past 44 years your favorite peeps included a cookie monster, a grouch who lived in a garbage can, a giant yellow bird, and a green frog named Kermit. Welcome to Sonia Manzano’s neighborhood when she was best known as Maria on Sesame Street. The award-winning children’s television writer, actor and author is being honored with the Legacy for Children Award 2017 by Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose for her contributions to early childhood education. The annual fundraising gala will honor Manzano with this prestigious award on May 19, at 6 p.m. at the McEnery Convention Center. Sonia Manzano was a pioneering trailblazer as one of television’s first leading Latina women at the forefront of a media revolution when public broadcasting took a chance with Sesame Street. The now legendary program was a game changer for PBS. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Corporation of Public Broadcasting that spawned PBS and Sesame Street, which proved that if done well children’s programming could be educational, especially for inner city children – a target audience early on. Manzano’s groundbreaking and popular contributions to national television have defined her as an influential role model and helped generations of young people aspire and dream beyond their own neighborhoods. “Sonia’s remarkable ability to help children develop social and emotional skills like empathy, compassion and acceptance resonates with the museum’s goals and values as an education center,” said Marilee Jennings, executive director of Children’s Discovery Museum. “Current research shows these soft skills are determinant in children’s future success. Sonia’s work in early childhood education has changed the lives of generations of children and parents and I’m honored to recognize her with the Legacy award.” Over the years, Sesame Street tackled many sensitive topics from death and incarceration to child abuse. As a trusted adult, one of Manzano’s greatest contributions as Maria was helping children better understand themselves and the world. As a result, Manzano had a profound effect on millions of children who tuned into Sesame Street every day to find a familiar neighborhood and a safe place with Maria. Manzano has won numerous awards for her writing, acting, and advocacy work for children, including 15 Emmy Awards as a writer for Sesame Street and the distinguished 2016 Daytime Emmy Lifetime Achievement Award. She received the Congressional Hispanic Caucus award, the Bronx Hall of Fame award and the Hispanic Heritage Award for Education. She’s authored four children’s picture books; her most recent is The Lowdown on the High Bridge, published by the Bronx Children’s Museum, A Box Full of Kittens, No Dogs Allowed!, and Miracle on 133rd Street as well as two books for young adults, The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano, and Becoming Maria: Love and Chaos in the South Bronx (her memoir). The Legacy for Children Award is presented annually in recognition of an individual or organization dedicated to advancing the lives and learning of children. Proceeds from the Legacy for Children Award event supports the museum’s hands-on educational exhibits, in-depth programming, and cultural events, all of which have a strong emphasis on diversity and inclusion, designed to give our community’s children the tools that will help them develop into the talented, creative and diverse workforce of tomorrow. For more information on Sonia Manzano, click here. With over 150 interactive exhibits and programs, Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose is one of the largest museums of its kind in the nation. Since opening its doors in 1990, the museum has welcomed over 8.3 million visitors and has offered new exhibits each year that respond to children's diverse educational needs. The striking 52,000 square foot purple building was designed by Mexico City-based architect Ricardo Legorreta and is a beacon of discovery. Encompassing the broad themes of community, connections and creativity, hands-on exhibits invite self-directed, open-ended explorations.  For more information about the Museum, visit www.cdm.org. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/98231aec-307d-4a16-92c7-d86dbd5980bc A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/f81a11a8-37c8-4588-b453-364680da50b1 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/cb92b7f6-1058-4172-b3c3-c65ae0bef3a2


San Jose, CA, May 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Imagine that for the past 44 years your favorite peeps included a cookie monster, a grouch who lived in a garbage can, a giant yellow bird, and a green frog named Kermit. Welcome to Sonia Manzano’s neighborhood when she was best known as Maria on Sesame Street. The award-winning children’s television writer, actor and author is being honored with the Legacy for Children Award 2017 by Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose for her contributions to early childhood education. The annual fundraising gala will honor Manzano with this prestigious award on May 19, at 6 p.m. at the McEnery Convention Center. Sonia Manzano was a pioneering trailblazer as one of television’s first leading Latina women at the forefront of a media revolution when public broadcasting took a chance with Sesame Street. The now legendary program was a game changer for PBS. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Corporation of Public Broadcasting that spawned PBS and Sesame Street, which proved that if done well children’s programming could be educational, especially for inner city children – a target audience early on. Manzano’s groundbreaking and popular contributions to national television have defined her as an influential role model and helped generations of young people aspire and dream beyond their own neighborhoods. “Sonia’s remarkable ability to help children develop social and emotional skills like empathy, compassion and acceptance resonates with the museum’s goals and values as an education center,” said Marilee Jennings, executive director of Children’s Discovery Museum. “Current research shows these soft skills are determinant in children’s future success. Sonia’s work in early childhood education has changed the lives of generations of children and parents and I’m honored to recognize her with the Legacy award.” Over the years, Sesame Street tackled many sensitive topics from death and incarceration to child abuse. As a trusted adult, one of Manzano’s greatest contributions as Maria was helping children better understand themselves and the world. As a result, Manzano had a profound effect on millions of children who tuned into Sesame Street every day to find a familiar neighborhood and a safe place with Maria. Manzano has won numerous awards for her writing, acting, and advocacy work for children, including 15 Emmy Awards as a writer for Sesame Street and the distinguished 2016 Daytime Emmy Lifetime Achievement Award. She received the Congressional Hispanic Caucus award, the Bronx Hall of Fame award and the Hispanic Heritage Award for Education. She’s authored four children’s picture books; her most recent is The Lowdown on the High Bridge, published by the Bronx Children’s Museum, A Box Full of Kittens, No Dogs Allowed!, and Miracle on 133rd Street as well as two books for young adults, The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano, and Becoming Maria: Love and Chaos in the South Bronx (her memoir). The Legacy for Children Award is presented annually in recognition of an individual or organization dedicated to advancing the lives and learning of children. Proceeds from the Legacy for Children Award event supports the museum’s hands-on educational exhibits, in-depth programming, and cultural events, all of which have a strong emphasis on diversity and inclusion, designed to give our community’s children the tools that will help them develop into the talented, creative and diverse workforce of tomorrow. For more information on Sonia Manzano, click here. With over 150 interactive exhibits and programs, Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose is one of the largest museums of its kind in the nation. Since opening its doors in 1990, the museum has welcomed over 8.3 million visitors and has offered new exhibits each year that respond to children's diverse educational needs. The striking 52,000 square foot purple building was designed by Mexico City-based architect Ricardo Legorreta and is a beacon of discovery. Encompassing the broad themes of community, connections and creativity, hands-on exhibits invite self-directed, open-ended explorations.  For more information about the Museum, visit www.cdm.org. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/98231aec-307d-4a16-92c7-d86dbd5980bc A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/f81a11a8-37c8-4588-b453-364680da50b1 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/cb92b7f6-1058-4172-b3c3-c65ae0bef3a2


San Jose, CA, May 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Imagine that for the past 44 years your favorite peeps included a cookie monster, a grouch who lived in a garbage can, a giant yellow bird, and a green frog named Kermit. Welcome to Sonia Manzano’s neighborhood when she was best known as Maria on Sesame Street. The award-winning children’s television writer, actor and author is being honored with the Legacy for Children Award 2017 by Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose for her contributions to early childhood education. The annual fundraising gala will honor Manzano with this prestigious award on May 19, at 6 p.m. at the McEnery Convention Center. Sonia Manzano was a pioneering trailblazer as one of television’s first leading Latina women at the forefront of a media revolution when public broadcasting took a chance with Sesame Street. The now legendary program was a game changer for PBS. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Corporation of Public Broadcasting that spawned PBS and Sesame Street, which proved that if done well children’s programming could be educational, especially for inner city children – a target audience early on. Manzano’s groundbreaking and popular contributions to national television have defined her as an influential role model and helped generations of young people aspire and dream beyond their own neighborhoods. “Sonia’s remarkable ability to help children develop social and emotional skills like empathy, compassion and acceptance resonates with the museum’s goals and values as an education center,” said Marilee Jennings, executive director of Children’s Discovery Museum. “Current research shows these soft skills are determinant in children’s future success. Sonia’s work in early childhood education has changed the lives of generations of children and parents and I’m honored to recognize her with the Legacy award.” Over the years, Sesame Street tackled many sensitive topics from death and incarceration to child abuse. As a trusted adult, one of Manzano’s greatest contributions as Maria was helping children better understand themselves and the world. As a result, Manzano had a profound effect on millions of children who tuned into Sesame Street every day to find a familiar neighborhood and a safe place with Maria. Manzano has won numerous awards for her writing, acting, and advocacy work for children, including 15 Emmy Awards as a writer for Sesame Street and the distinguished 2016 Daytime Emmy Lifetime Achievement Award. She received the Congressional Hispanic Caucus award, the Bronx Hall of Fame award and the Hispanic Heritage Award for Education. She’s authored four children’s picture books; her most recent is The Lowdown on the High Bridge, published by the Bronx Children’s Museum, A Box Full of Kittens, No Dogs Allowed!, and Miracle on 133rd Street as well as two books for young adults, The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano, and Becoming Maria: Love and Chaos in the South Bronx (her memoir). The Legacy for Children Award is presented annually in recognition of an individual or organization dedicated to advancing the lives and learning of children. Proceeds from the Legacy for Children Award event supports the museum’s hands-on educational exhibits, in-depth programming, and cultural events, all of which have a strong emphasis on diversity and inclusion, designed to give our community’s children the tools that will help them develop into the talented, creative and diverse workforce of tomorrow. For more information on Sonia Manzano, click here. With over 150 interactive exhibits and programs, Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose is one of the largest museums of its kind in the nation. Since opening its doors in 1990, the museum has welcomed over 8.3 million visitors and has offered new exhibits each year that respond to children's diverse educational needs. The striking 52,000 square foot purple building was designed by Mexico City-based architect Ricardo Legorreta and is a beacon of discovery. Encompassing the broad themes of community, connections and creativity, hands-on exhibits invite self-directed, open-ended explorations.  For more information about the Museum, visit www.cdm.org. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/98231aec-307d-4a16-92c7-d86dbd5980bc A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/f81a11a8-37c8-4588-b453-364680da50b1 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/cb92b7f6-1058-4172-b3c3-c65ae0bef3a2


San Jose, CA, May 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Imagine that for the past 44 years your favorite peeps included a cookie monster, a grouch who lived in a garbage can, a giant yellow bird, and a green frog named Kermit. Welcome to Sonia Manzano’s neighborhood when she was best known as Maria on Sesame Street. The award-winning children’s television writer, actor and author is being honored with the Legacy for Children Award 2017 by Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose for her contributions to early childhood education. The annual fundraising gala will honor Manzano with this prestigious award on May 19, at 6 p.m. at the McEnery Convention Center. Sonia Manzano was a pioneering trailblazer as one of television’s first leading Latina women at the forefront of a media revolution when public broadcasting took a chance with Sesame Street. The now legendary program was a game changer for PBS. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Corporation of Public Broadcasting that spawned PBS and Sesame Street, which proved that if done well children’s programming could be educational, especially for inner city children – a target audience early on. Manzano’s groundbreaking and popular contributions to national television have defined her as an influential role model and helped generations of young people aspire and dream beyond their own neighborhoods. “Sonia’s remarkable ability to help children develop social and emotional skills like empathy, compassion and acceptance resonates with the museum’s goals and values as an education center,” said Marilee Jennings, executive director of Children’s Discovery Museum. “Current research shows these soft skills are determinant in children’s future success. Sonia’s work in early childhood education has changed the lives of generations of children and parents and I’m honored to recognize her with the Legacy award.” Over the years, Sesame Street tackled many sensitive topics from death and incarceration to child abuse. As a trusted adult, one of Manzano’s greatest contributions as Maria was helping children better understand themselves and the world. As a result, Manzano had a profound effect on millions of children who tuned into Sesame Street every day to find a familiar neighborhood and a safe place with Maria. Manzano has won numerous awards for her writing, acting, and advocacy work for children, including 15 Emmy Awards as a writer for Sesame Street and the distinguished 2016 Daytime Emmy Lifetime Achievement Award. She received the Congressional Hispanic Caucus award, the Bronx Hall of Fame award and the Hispanic Heritage Award for Education. She’s authored four children’s picture books; her most recent is The Lowdown on the High Bridge, published by the Bronx Children’s Museum, A Box Full of Kittens, No Dogs Allowed!, and Miracle on 133rd Street as well as two books for young adults, The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano, and Becoming Maria: Love and Chaos in the South Bronx (her memoir). The Legacy for Children Award is presented annually in recognition of an individual or organization dedicated to advancing the lives and learning of children. Proceeds from the Legacy for Children Award event supports the museum’s hands-on educational exhibits, in-depth programming, and cultural events, all of which have a strong emphasis on diversity and inclusion, designed to give our community’s children the tools that will help them develop into the talented, creative and diverse workforce of tomorrow. For more information on Sonia Manzano, click here. With over 150 interactive exhibits and programs, Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose is one of the largest museums of its kind in the nation. Since opening its doors in 1990, the museum has welcomed over 8.3 million visitors and has offered new exhibits each year that respond to children's diverse educational needs. The striking 52,000 square foot purple building was designed by Mexico City-based architect Ricardo Legorreta and is a beacon of discovery. Encompassing the broad themes of community, connections and creativity, hands-on exhibits invite self-directed, open-ended explorations.  For more information about the Museum, visit www.cdm.org. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/98231aec-307d-4a16-92c7-d86dbd5980bc A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/f81a11a8-37c8-4588-b453-364680da50b1 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/cb92b7f6-1058-4172-b3c3-c65ae0bef3a2


Researchers investigating a form of adult-onset diabetes that shares features with the two better-known types of diabetes have discovered genetic influences that may offer clues to more accurate diagnosis and treatment. Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is informally called "type 1.5 diabetes" because like type 1 diabetes (T1D), LADA is marked by circulating autoantibodies, an indicator that an overactive immune system is damaging the body's insulin-producing beta cells. But LADA also shares clinical features with type 2 diabetes (T2D), which tends to appear in adulthood. Also, as in T2D, LADA patients do not require insulin treatments when first diagnosed. A study published April 25 in BMC Medicine uses genetic analysis to show that LADA is closer to T1D than to T2D. "Correctly diagnosing subtypes of diabetes is important, because it affects how physicians manage a patient's disease," said co-study leader Struan F.A. Grant, PhD, a genomics researcher at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). "If patients are misdiagnosed with the wrong type of diabetes, they may not receive the most effective medication." Grant collaborated with European scientists, led by Richard David Leslie of the University of London, U.K.; and Bernhard O. Boehm, of Ulm University Medical Center, Germany and the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, a joint medical school of Imperial College London and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Occurring when patients cannot produce their own insulin or are unable to properly process the insulin they do produce, diabetes is usually classified into two major types. T1D, formerly called juvenile diabetes, generally presents in childhood, but may also appear first in adults. T2D, formerly called non-insulin-dependent diabetes, typically appears in adults, but has been increasing over the past several decades in children and teens. Some 90 percent or more of all patients with diabetes are diagnosed with T2D. Grant and many other researchers have discovered dozens of genetic regions that increase diabetes risk, usually with different sets of variants associated with T1D compared to T2D. The current study, the largest-ever genetic study of LADA, sought to determine how established T1D- or T2D-associated variants operate in the context of LADA. The study team compared DNA from 978 LADA patients, all adults from the U.K. and Germany, to a control group of 1,057 children without diabetes. Another set of control samples came from 2,820 healthy adults in the U.K. All samples were from individuals of European ancestry. The researchers calculated genetic risk scores to measure whether LADA patients had genetic profiles more similar to those of T1D or T2D patients. They found several T1D genetic regions associated with LADA, while relatively few T2D gene regions added to the risk of LADA. The genetic risk in LADA from T1D risk alleles was lower than in childhood-onset T1D, possibly accounting for the fact that LADA appears later in life. One variant, located in TCF7L2, which Grant and colleagues showed in 2006 to be among the strongest genetic risk factors for T2D reported to date, had no role in LADA. "Our finding that LADA is genetically closer to T1D than to T2D suggests that some proportion of patients diagnosed as adults with type 2 diabetes may actually have late-onset type 1 diabetes," said Grant. Grant said that larger studies are needed to further uncover genetic influences in the complex biology of diabetes, adding, "As we continue to integrate genetic findings with clinical characteristics, we may be able to more accurately classify diabetes subtypes to match patients with more effective treatments." Grant received support for this research from the National Institutes of Health (grant R01 DK085212) and the Daniel B. Burke Endowed Chair for Diabetes Research. "Relative Contribution of type 1 and type 2 diabetes loci to the genetic etiology of adult-onset, non-insulin-requiring autoimmune diabetes" BMC Medicine, published online April 25, 2017. http://doi. About Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia was founded in 1855 as the nation's first pediatric hospital. Through its long-standing commitment to providing exceptional patient care, training new generations of pediatric healthcare professionals, and pioneering major research initiatives, Children's Hospital has fostered many discoveries that have benefited children worldwide. Its pediatric research program is among the largest in the country. In addition, its unique family-centered care and public service programs have brought the 546-bed hospital recognition as a leading advocate for children and adolescents. For more information, visit http://www.

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