Child Neuropsychiatry

Brescia, Italy

Child Neuropsychiatry

Brescia, Italy
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Suppiej A.,University of Padua | Mastrangelo M.,V Buzzi Hospital | Mastella L.,Child Neuropsychiatry | Accorsi P.,Civile Hospital | And 7 more authors.
Brain and Development | Year: 2016

Background: Neonatal seizures are a risk factor for later epilepsy and their etiology is known to be implicated in the outcome but, little is known about this issue in the subgroup of seizures symptomatic of perinatal arterial ischemic stroke. The aim of this study was to describe the long term risk of epilepsy after electroencephalographic confirmed neonatal seizures symptomatic of perinatal arterial ischemic stroke. Design/subject: Fifty-five patients with electroclinical ictal data, vascular territory confirmed by neuroimaging and a minimum follow up of 3.5 years were identified from a multi-centre prospective neonatal seizures registry. Primary outcome was occurrence of post-neonatal epilepsy. The association of outcome with family history of epilepsy, gender, location of the infarct, neonatal clinical and electroencephalogram data were also studied. Results: During a mean follow up of 8 years and 5 months, 16.4% of the patients developed post neonatal epilepsy. The mean age at first post neonatal seizure was 4 years and 2 months (range 1-10 years and 6 months). Location of the infarct was the only statistically significant risk factor (p = 0.001); epilepsy was more represented in males but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Neonatal seizures symptomatic of perinatal arterial ischemic stroke had lower risk and later onset of post-neonatal epilepsy, compared to seizures described in the setting of other perinatal brain insults. Our data have implications for counseling to the family at discharge from neonatal intensive care unit. © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology.


PubMed | University of Padua, Regional Hospital of Bolzano, Civile Hospital, V Buzzi Hospital and 5 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Brain & development | Year: 2015

Neonatal seizures are a risk factor for later epilepsy and their etiology is known to be implicated in the outcome but, little is known about this issue in the subgroup of seizures symptomatic of perinatal arterial ischemic stroke. The aim of this study was to describe the long term risk of epilepsy after electroencephalographic confirmed neonatal seizures symptomatic of perinatal arterial ischemic stroke.Fifty-five patients with electroclinical ictal data, vascular territory confirmed by neuroimaging and a minimum follow up of 3.5 years were identified from a multi-centre prospective neonatal seizures registry. Primary outcome was occurrence of post-neonatal epilepsy. The association of outcome with family history of epilepsy, gender, location of the infarct, neonatal clinical and electroencephalogram data were also studied.During a mean follow up of 8 years and 5 months, 16.4% of the patients developed post neonatal epilepsy. The mean age at first post neonatal seizure was 4 years and 2 months (range 1-10 years and 6 months). Location of the infarct was the only statistically significant risk factor (p=0.001); epilepsy was more represented in males but the difference was not statistically significant.Neonatal seizures symptomatic of perinatal arterial ischemic stroke had lower risk and later onset of post-neonatal epilepsy, compared to seizures described in the setting of other perinatal brain insults. Our data have implications for counseling to the family at discharge from neonatal intensive care unit.


Agostinelli S.,University of Chieti Pescara | Traverso M.,G Gaslini Institute | Accorsi P.,Child Neuropsychiatry | Beccaria F.,C Poma Hospital | And 22 more authors.
European Journal of Neurology | Year: 2013

Background and purposes: To determine the prevalence of SLC2A1 mutations in children with early-onset absence epilepsy (EOAE) and to investigate whether there were differences in demographic and electroclinical data between patients who became seizure-free with anti-epileptic drug (AED) monotherapy (group I) and those who needed add-on treatment of a second AED (group II). Methods: We reviewed children with EOAE attending different Italian epilepsy centers. All participants had onset of absence seizures within the first 3 years of life but otherwise conformed to a strict definition of childhood absence epilepsy. Mutation analysis of SLC2A1 was performed in each patient. Results: Eighty-four children (57 in group I, 27 in group II) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. No mutation in SLC2A1 was found. There were no statistical differences between the two groups with regard to F/M ratio, age at onset of EOAE, early history of febrile seizures, first-degree family history for genetic generalized epilepsy, duration of AED therapy at 3 years after enrollment, use of AEDs at 3 years, failed withdrawals at 3 years, terminal remission of EOAE at 3 years, and 6-month follow-up EEG data. Mean duration of seizures/active epilepsy was significantly shorter in group I than in group II (P = 0.008). Conclusions: We demonstrate that in a large series of children with rigorous diagnosis of EOAE, no mutations in SLC2A1 gene are detected. Except for duration of seizures/active epilepsy, no significant differences in demographic and electroclinical aspects are observed between children with EOAE who responded well to AED monotherapy and those who became seizure-free with add-on treatment of a second AED. © 2012 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2012 EFNS.


Capovilla G.,C Poma Hospital | Beccaria F.,C Poma Hospital | Bianchi A.,San Donato Hospital | Canevini M.P.,University of Milan | And 9 more authors.
Brain and Development | Year: 2011

Purpose: To describe the EEG pattern of seizures in patients with benign childhood epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BCECTS). Methods: The clinical and EEG data of 701 BCECTS patients with at least a 3. years follow-up were reviewed from 10 epilepsy centers. Results: Thirty-four seizures were recorded in 30 patients. Four different ictal EEG patterns (A-D) were identified. The most frequent (pattern A) was characterized by low voltage activity of fast rhythmic spikes, increasing in amplitude and decreasing in frequency, and occurred in 14 children. Pattern B (six patients) was constituted by a discharge of spikes intermixed with sharp waves increasing in frequency and amplitude. Pattern C (seven children) consisted of monomorphic theta which progressively formed a discharge increasing in amplitude and decreasing in frequency. Pattern D (5 children) was characterized by a initial focal depression of the electrical activity, followed by one of the three above described patterns. In 21 out of 28 children, the initial ictal pattern, altered from one pattern to another one. No clinical or EEG feature was predictive of a specific ictal pattern. Discussion: We failed to identify a unique ictal EEG pattern in our patients with BCECTS. The occurrence of per-ictal features, e.g., initial EEG depression or post-ictal slowing, is common and should not be interpreted with prejudice. Alteration of ictal EEG pattern from one to another is not in conflict with the diagnosis of BCECTS. © 2010 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology.


Katzaki E.,University of Siena | Morin G.,University of Amiens | Pollazzon M.,University of Siena | Papa F.T.,University of Siena | And 10 more authors.
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A | Year: 2010

During the last few years, an increasing number of microdeletion/ microduplication syndromes have been delineated. This rapid evolution is mainly due to the availability of micro-array technology as a routine diagnostic tool. Microdeletions of the 21q22.11q22.12 region encompassing the RUNX1 gene have been reported in nine patients presenting with syndromic thrombocytopenia and mental retardation. RUNX1 gene is responsible for an autosomal dominant platelet disorder with predisposition to acute myelogenous leukemia. We report on three novel patients with an overlapping "de novo" interstitial deletion involving the band 21q22 characterized by array-CGH. All our patients presented with severe developmental delay, dysmorphic features, behavioral problems, and thrombocytopenia. Comparing the clinical features of our patients with the overlapping ones already reported two potential phenotypes related to 21q22 microdeletion including RUNX1 were highlighted: thrombocytopenia with ± mild dysmorphic features and syndromic thrombocytopenia with growth and developmental delay. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.


Bijlsma E.K.,Leiden University | Collins A.,Princess Anne Hospital | Papa F.T.,University of Siena | Tejada M.I.,Cruces Hospital | And 26 more authors.
European Journal of Medical Genetics | Year: 2012

Duplications leading to functional disomy of chromosome Xq28, including MECP2 as the critical dosage-sensitive gene, are associated with a distinct clinical phenotype in males, characterized by severe mental retardation, infantile hypotonia, progressive neurologic impairment, recurrent infections, bladder dysfunction, and absent speech.Female patients with Xq duplications including MECP2 are rare. Only recently submicroscopic duplications of this region on Xq28 have been recognized in four females, and a triplication in a fifth, all in combination with random X-chromosome inactivation (XCI). Based on this small series, it was concluded that in females with MECP2 duplication and random XCI, the typical symptoms of affected boys are not present. We present clinical and molecular data on a series of five females with an Xq28 duplication including the MECP2 gene, both isolated and as the result of a translocation, and compare them with the previously reported cases of small duplications in females. The collected data indicate that the associated phenotype in females is distinct from males with similar duplications, but the clinical effects may be as severe as seen in males. © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS.


Artuso R.,University of Siena | Mencarelli M.A.,University of Siena | Polli R.,University of Padua | Sartori S.,University of Padua | And 15 more authors.
Brain and Development | Year: 2010

Background: Rett syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder affecting almost exclusively females. Among Rett clinical variants, the early-onset seizure variant describes girls with early onset epilepsy and it is caused by mutations in CDKL5. Methods: Four previously reported girls and five new cases with CDKL5 mutation, ranging from 14 months to 13 years, were evaluated by two clinical geneticists, classified using a severity score system based on the evaluation of 22 different clinical signs and compared with 128 classic Rett and 25 Zappella variant MECP2-mutated patients, evaluated by the same clinical geneticists. Clinical features were compared with previously described CDKL5 mutated patients. Both the statistical and the descriptive approach have been used to delineate clinical diagnostic criteria. Results: All girls present epilepsy with onset varying from 10 days to 3 months. Patients may present different type of seizures both at onset and during the whole course of the disease; multiple seizure types may also occur in the same individual. After treatment with antiepileptic drugs patients may experience a short seizure-free period but epilepsy progressively relapses. Typical stereotypic hand movements severely affecting the ability to grasp are present. Psychomotor development is severely impaired. In the majority of cases head circumference is within the normal range both at birth and at the time of clinical examination. Conclusion: For the practical clinical approach we propose to use six necessary and eight supportive diagnostic criteria. Epilepsy with onset between the first week and 5 months of life, hand stereotypies, as well as severe hypotonia, are included among the necessary criteria. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Mencarelli M.A.,University of Siena | Tassini M.,University of Siena | Pollazzon M.,University of Siena | Vivi A.,University of Siena | And 10 more authors.
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A | Year: 2011

Creatine deficiency syndrome due to mutations in X-linked SLC6A8 gene results in nonspecific intellectual disability (ID). Diagnosis cannot be established on clinical grounds and is often based on the assessment of brain creatine levels by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Considering high costs of MRS and necessity of sedation, this technique cannot be used as a first level-screening test. Likewise, gene test analysis is time consuming and not easily accessible to all laboratories. In this article feasibility of urine analysis (creatine/creatinine (Cr/Crn) ratio) performed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a first level-screening test is explored. Before running a systematic selection of cases a preliminary study for further molecular analysis is shown. NMR urine spectra (n=1,347) of male patients with an ID without a clinically recognizable syndrome were measured. On the basis of abnormal Cr/Crn ratio, three patients with the highest values were selected for molecular analysis. A confirmatory second urine test was positive in two patients and diagnosis was further confirmed by a decreased brain creatine level and by SLC6A8 gene analysis. A de novo mutation was identified in one. Another patient inherited a novel mutation from the mother who also has a mild ID. A repeat urine test was negative in the third patient and accordingly creatine level in the brain and SLC6A8 gene analysis both gave a normal result. We conclude that Cr/Crn ratio measured by NMR for male patients represents a rapid and useful first level screening test preceding molecular analysis. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Loading Child Neuropsychiatry collaborators
Loading Child Neuropsychiatry collaborators