Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic

Karlskrona, Sweden

Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic

Karlskrona, Sweden
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van Balkom I.D.C.,Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic | van Balkom I.D.C.,Lentis Psychiatric Institute | van Balkom I.D.C.,University of Groningen | Bresnahan M.,Columbia University | And 8 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

Objective: The aim of this study was to examine paternal age in relation to risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in a setting other than the industrialized west. Design: A case-control study of Aruban-born children (1990-2003). Cases (N = 95) were identified at the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic, the only such clinic in Aruba; gender and age matched controls (N = 347) were gathered from public health records. Parental age was defined categorically (≤29, 30-39, 40-49, ≥50y). The analysis was made, using conditional logistic regression. Results: Advanced paternal age was associated with increased risk of ASDs in offspring. In comparison to the youngest paternal age group (≤29y), risk of autism increased 2.18 times for children born from fathers in their thirties, 2.71 times for fathers in their forties, and 3.22 thereafter. Conclusion: This study, part of the first epidemiologic study of autism in the Caribbean, contributes additional evidence, from a distinctive sociocultural setting, of the risk of ASD associated with increased paternal age. © 2012 van Balkom et al.


Tingskull S.,Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic | Svedin C.G.,Linköping University | Agnafors S.,Linköping University | Sydsjo G.,Linköping University | And 2 more authors.
Child Abuse Review | Year: 2015

The purpose of this study was to investigate the agreement between parent and child report of potential traumas experienced, to look at the agreement by interpersonal versus non-interpersonal traumas and by gender. A birth cohort of 1723 children and their parents was followed from three months until 12 years after birth (South East Sweden Birth Cohort (SESBiC) study). At 12-year follow-up, 1174 children, 875 mothers and 601 fathers completed the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events (LITE) questionnaire. Cohen's kappa was used to assess the agreement between parent and child reports of traumas experienced by the child. The group was split by gender and kappa statistics were computed to determine the level of agreement between the different informants. The sample was also analysed according to the nature of the traumatic event: interpersonal or non-interpersonal. Agreement was low across most types of traumas reported between parents and children and moderate between mothers and fathers. Agreement was lower when the trauma was interpersonal. No significant discrepancies in general were found on gender. The study highlights the importance of from whom the researcher collects information. In future research, it is important to study the significance the choice of information source might have on reported symptoms and behavioural problems. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


PubMed | Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2012

The aim of this study was to examine paternal age in relation to risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in a setting other than the industrialized west.A case-control study of Aruban-born children (1990-2003). Cases (N = 95) were identified at the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic, the only such clinic in Aruba; gender and age matched controls (N = 347) were gathered from public health records. Parental age was defined categorically ( 29, 30-39, 40-49, 50 y). The analysis was made, using conditional logistic regression.Advanced paternal age was associated with increased risk of ASDs in offspring. In comparison to the youngest paternal age group ( 29 y), risk of autism increased 2.18 times for children born from fathers in their thirties, 2.71 times for fathers in their forties, and 3.22 thereafter.This study, part of the first epidemiologic study of autism in the Caribbean, contributes additional evidence, from a distinctive sociocultural setting, of the risk of ASD associated with increased paternal age.


PubMed | Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Psychotherapy (Chicago, Ill.) | Year: 2011

Depression treatment with antidepressants is generally described as evidence-based. However, generalizations to practice recommendations seem to us to rest on the tacit assumption that treatment outcome in research trials is the sum of three factors: specific effects of the drug, expectancy effects (placebo), and spontaneous recovery. Because randomization isolates the specific effects of the drug, trials showing significant drug effects are used as evidence for prescribing the drug regardless of context. Drawing on Wampolds (2001) description of two metamodels of psychotherapy, the authors argue that available empirical evidence indicates that depression treatment with antidepressants is primarily a psychological treatment. This conclusion has far-reaching consequences for the scientific status of contemporary treatments for depression. It also affects what the doctor should focus on in a treatment with antidepressants and how to act when the patient is treatment resistant. In order to achieve the results obtained in clinical trials, the quantity and quality of support from the doctor is more important than pharmacological concerns, such as adequate doses of medicine. When faced with a treatment resistant patient, relationship factors rather than pharmacological factors should be in focus. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

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