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News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Scientists are closer to understanding why deep sleep is crucial for the brain’s ability to learn efficiently. Researchers from the University of Zurich and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology have discovered for the first time the causal context as to why deep sleep is crucial to the learning efficiency of the brain and developed a non-invasive method for modulating deep sleep in a targeted region of the brain. “We have developed a method that lets us reduce the sleep depth in a certain part of the brain and therefore prove the causal connection between deep sleep and learning efficiency,” Reto Huber, professor at the University Children's Hospital Zurich and of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at UZH, said in a statement. The researchers focally perturbed deep sleep in the motor cortex, while investigating the consequences on behavioral and neurophysiological markers of neuroplasticity arising from dedicated motor practice. They discovered that the capacity to undergo neuroplastic changes is reduced by wakefulness but restored during unperturbed sleep. A single sleepless night can lead to difficulty in mastering mental tasks the following day. While we are awake we receive constant impressions of the environment, where synapses—connections between the nerve cells—are excited and intensified at times. Perpetual increases in synaptic strength would render the brain highly insensitive to new inputs due to neurons losing their ability to fire selectively and synapses could not be further potentiated—saturating neural plasticity. The need for cellular maintenance and the removal of potentially neurotoxic waste would be enhanced, causing an unsustainable level of energy consumption. According to the study, when slow waves are selectively perturbed in motor cortex, the restorative process is markedly attenuated, showing that deep sleep is a requirement for maintaining sustainable learning efficiency. The researchers examined six women and seven men, who had to master three different motoric tasks during the study.  The volunteers had their sleep manipulated at times while the researchers localized the part of the brain responsible for learning the finger movements they were tasked with for the control of motor skills. The researchers were able to learn how the manipulation of deep sleep impacted the motoric learning tasks the next day. The participants performed well in the morning after a deep sleep but struggled more as the day went on. After sleeping again, the participant’s efficiency increased.  However, after a manipulated sleep performance, difficulties in learning the finger movements was noticeably weaker. “In the strongly excited region of the brain, learning efficiency was saturated and could no longer be changed, which inhibited the learning of motor skills,” Nicole Wenderoth, a professor in the Department of Health Sciences and Technology at the ETH Zurich, said in a statement. According to the study, there is a lack of causal evidence in humans due to the inability to sleep deprive one target area while keeping the natural sleep pattern intact. “Many diseases manifest in sleep as well, such as epilepsy,” Huber said. “Using the new method, we hope to be able to manipulate those specific brain regions that are directly connected with the disease.” The study was published in Nature Communications.


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

For the first time, researchers of the University of Zurich and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich have demonstrated the causal context of why deep sleep is important to the learning efficiency of the human brain. They have developed a new, non-invasive method for modulating deep sleep in humans in a targeted region of the brain. Most people know from their own experience that just a single sleepless night can lead to difficulty in mastering mental tasks the next day. Researchers assume that deep sleep is essential for maintaining the learning efficiency of the human brain in the long term. While we are awake, we constantly receive impressions from our environment, whereby numerous connections between the nerve cells - so-called synapses - are excited and intensified at times. The excitation of the synapses does not normalize again until we fall asleep. Without a recovery phase, many synapses remain maximally excited, which means that changes in the system are no longer possible: Learning efficiency is blocked. The connection between deep sleep and learning efficiency has long been known and proven. Now, researchers at the University of Zurich (UZH) and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich have been able to demonstrate a causal connection within the human brain for the first time. Reto Huber, professor at the University Children's Hospital Zurich and of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at UZH, and Nicole Wenderoth, professor in the Department of Health Sciences and Technology at the ETH Zurich, have succeeded in manipulating the deep sleep of test subjects in targeted areas. "We have developed a method that lets us reduce the sleep depth in a certain part of the brain and therefore prove the causal connection between deep sleep and learning efficiency," says Reto Huber. In the two-part experiment with six women and seven men, the test subjects had to master three different motoric tasks. The concrete assignment was to learn various sequences of finger movements throughout the day. At night, the brain activity of the test subjects during sleep was monitored by EEG. While the test subjects were able to sleep without disturbance after the learning phase on the first day, their sleep was manipulated in a targeted manner on the second day of the experiment - using acoustic stimulation during the deep sleep phase. To do so, the researchers localized precisely that part of the brain responsible for learning the abovementioned finger movements, i.e., for the control of motor skills (motor cortex). The test subjects were not aware of this manipulation; to them, the sleep quality of both experimental phases was comparable on the following day. In a second step, researchers tested how the manipulation of deep sleep affected the motoric learning tasks on the following day. Here, they observed how the learning and performance curves of the test subjects changed over the course of the experiment. As expected, the participants were particularly able to learn the motoric task well in the morning. As the day went on, however, the rate of mistakes rose. After sleep, the learning efficiency considerably improved again. This was not the case after the night with the manipulated sleep phase. Here, clear performance losses and difficulties in learning the finger movements were revealed. Learning efficiency was similarly as weak as on the evening of the first day of the experiment. Through the manipulation of the motor cortex, the excitability of the corresponding synapses was not reduced during sleep. "In the strongly excited region of the brain, learning efficiency was saturated and could no longer be changed, which inhibited the learning of motor skills," Nicole Wenderoth explains. In a controlled experiment with the same task assignment, researchers manipulated another region of the brain during sleep. In this case, however, this manipulation had no effect on the learning efficiency of the test subjects. The newly gained knowledge is an important step in researching human sleep. The objective of the scientists is to use this knowledge in clinical studies. "Many diseases manifest in sleep as well, such as epilepsy," Reto Huber explains. "Using the new method, we hope to be able to manipulate those specific brain regions that are directly connected with the disease." This could help improve the condition of affected patients.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Teenagers injured through drinking, drug abuse or self-harming have a five-fold increased risk of dying from suicide in the next decade. Children and young people admitted to hospital in England with injuries related to self-harming, drugs or alcohol faced an increased risk of killing themselves over the following 10 years, according to new research. While previous studies have shown that children and adolescents who self-harm are at a higher risk of suicide, the paper by academics from UCL and the University of Leeds, argues that the risks apply to a larger group of adolescents. The researchers say children injured through drink or drugs faced a similar increased risk of suicide as children who had been self-harming - and the National Health Service needed to revise its guidelines to target help and support at these young people. The study examined anonymous hospital data relating to more than one million young people aged 10 to 19 who were admitted to an emergency department in England between 1997 and 2012 having suffered an injury. The injuries were categorised as having been caused either accidentally - or through 'adversity', where the injuries were self-inflicted, from drug or alcohol abuse, or violence. The research team then looked at what had happened to the young people in the decade following the hospital admission. They found that the death rate among the group which had suffered the adversity-related injuries was twice as high as the youngsters who had suffered the accidental injuries. Among the adversity group, the death rate for girls was 7.3 per 1,000 - and 15.6 per 1,000 for boys. Two-thirds of the deaths were attributable to suicide, drug or alcohol misuse or to homicide, according to the research which is published in the Lancet. One of the key findings of the study was that the risk of suicide was similar between young people who had self-harmed and those who had misused drugs or alcohol - an observation not been reported in medical journals until now. The suicide rate of these young people was about five-times of that seen in the accidental injury group. The researchers also found that young people who had self-inflicted injuries were just as likely to die from drug and alcohol misuse as from suicide. The increased rates of deaths from suicide or drug and alcohol misuse in the adversity group resulted in an additional 1,075 deaths - 683 boys and 392 girls. This was an observational study, so it can increase our understanding of possible links between self-inflicted injury and suicide, but it doesn't show that one necessarily causes the other because other factors could be involved. Young Minds is a UK charity seeking to promote better mental health among adolescents. Its chief executive, Sarah Brennan, said: "This ground-breaking research demonstrates some of the interconnections between self-harm, substance misuse and violent injury - and the tragic consequences that these experiences may have. "It is essential that we don't think of young people simply in terms of a list of "issues", and that we understand how distress can be expressed in different ways at different times." The study showed young people are arriving at hospital with injuries which are not being identified as 'red flags' of an increased risk of a premature death. David Cottrell, Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of Leeds and one of the investigators, said: "Clinicians have not fully appreciated the risks facing children and young people who arrive in hospital emergency departments having suffered an adversity-related injury. "It is well established that children who self-harm are at an increased risk of suicide. "But the research points to that fact that the risk extends to a much broader group. Children and young people who suffered injuries through drink or drugs or violence also faced an increased risk of suicide or premature death through alcohol and drug behaviours." "These young people are coming into contact with the health services and that means there's an opportunity for them to get help and support. Based on this evidence, official guidance given to staff in emergency departments needs to be reviewed so these young people are also seen as being at risk." It is standard practice for a mental health professional to assess a young person who has a self-inflicted injury, but that does not extend to those injuries related to misusing alcohol or drugs or to violence. The researchers say mental health support should also be targeted at all children suffering adversity-related injuries. Dr Annie Herbert, from UCL Institute of Epidemiology and Healthcare, said: "A huge amount of deaths after adversity-related injury in our study were from suicide or drug or alcohol abuse, which to an extent should be preventable. "More research is needed to find the best way for clinicians to support these children and young people, to reduce risks of future harm after they leave hospital." Professor Ruth Gilbert, from UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, said: "Our findings show the enormous value of using routinely collected patient data to spot opportunities for the NHS to intervene to reduce the risk of harm for vulnerable patients, many of whom come back to hospital time and again." 1, A proof copy of the Lancet report can be downloaded here. This copy will be subject to changes ahead of publication: https:/ 2, To interview Professor David Cottrell, please contact David Lewis in the University of Leeds press office on (+44) 0113 343 8059 or emaild.lewis@leeds.ac.uk 3, To interview Dr Annie Herbert, please contact Rowan Walker at UCL on (+44) 020 3108 8515 or email rowan.walker@ucl.ac.uk UCL was founded in 1826. We were the first English university established after Oxford and Cambridge, the first to open up university education to those previously excluded from it, and the first to provide systematic teaching of law, architecture and medicine. We are among the world's top universities, as reflected by performance in a range of international rankings and tables. UCL currently has over 38,000 students from 150 countries and over 12,000 staff. Our annual income is more than £1 billion. http://www. | Follow us on Twitter @uclnews | Watch our YouTube channel YouTube.com/UCLTV The University of Leeds is one of the largest higher education institutions in the UK, with more than 33,000 students from 147 different countries, and a member of the Russell Group research-intensive universities. We are a top 10 university for research and impact power in the UK, according to the2014 Research Excellence Framework, and positioned as one of the top 100 best universities in the world in the 2015 QS World University Rankings. We are The Times and The Sunday Times University of the Year 2017 http://www. 6, Young Minds is a specialist charity for children and young people's mental health in the UK 7, The research was funded by the UK Department of Health.


News Article | May 29, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Teenagers injured through drinking, drug abuse or self-harming have a five-fold increased risk of dying from suicide in the next decade. Children and young people admitted to hospital in England with injuries related to self-harming, drugs or alcohol faced an increased risk of killing themselves over the following 10 years, according to new research. While previous studies have shown that children and adolescents who self-harm are at a higher risk of suicide, the paper by academics from UCL and the University of Leeds, argues that the risks apply to a larger group of adolescents. The researchers say children injured through drink or drugs faced a similar increased risk of suicide as children who had been self-harming -- and the National Health Service needed to revise its guidelines to target help and support at these young people. The study examined anonymous hospital data relating to more than one million young people aged 10 to 19 who were admitted to an emergency department in England between 1997 and 2012 having suffered an injury. The injuries were categorised as having been caused either accidentally -- or through 'adversity', where the injuries were self-inflicted, from drug or alcohol abuse, or violence. The research team then looked at what had happened to the young people in the decade following the hospital admission. They found that the death rate among the group which had suffered the adversity-related injuries was twice as high as the youngsters who had suffered the accidental injuries. Among the adversity group, the death rate for girls was 7.3 per 1,000 -- and 15.6 per 1,000 for boys. Two-thirds of the deaths were attributable to suicide, drug or alcohol misuse or to homicide, according to the research which is published in the Lancet. One of the key findings of the study was that the risk of suicide was similar between young people who had self-harmed and those who had misused drugs or alcohol -- an observation not been reported in medical journals until now. The suicide rate of these young people was about five-times of that seen in the accidental injury group. The researchers also found that young people who had self-inflicted injuries were just as likely to die from drug and alcohol misuse as from suicide. The increased rates of deaths from suicide or drug and alcohol misuse in the adversity group resulted in an additional 1,075 deaths -- 683 boys and 392 girls. This was an observational study, so it can increase our understanding of possible links between self-inflicted injury and suicide, but it doesn't show that one necessarily causes the other because other factors could be involved. Young Minds is a UK charity seeking to promote better mental health among adolescents. Its chief executive, Sarah Brennan, said: "This ground-breaking research demonstrates some of the interconnections between self-harm, substance misuse and violent injury -- and the tragic consequences that these experiences may have. "It is essential that we don't think of young people simply in terms of a list of "issues," and that we understand how distress can be expressed in different ways at different times." The study showed young people are arriving at hospital with injuries which are not being identified as 'red flags' of an increased risk of a premature death. David Cottrell, Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of Leeds and one of the investigators, said: "Clinicians have not fully appreciated the risks facing children and young people who arrive in hospital emergency departments having suffered an adversity-related injury. "It is well established that children who self-harm are at an increased risk of suicide. "But the research points to that fact that the risk extends to a much broader group. Children and young people who suffered injuries through drink or drugs or violence also faced an increased risk of suicide or premature death through alcohol and drug behaviours." "These young people are coming into contact with the health services and that means there's an opportunity for them to get help and support. Based on this evidence, official guidance given to staff in emergency departments needs to be reviewed so these young people are also seen as being at risk." It is standard practice for a mental health professional to assess a young person who has a self-inflicted injury, but that does not extend to those injuries related to misusing alcohol or drugs or to violence. The researchers say mental health support should also be targeted at all children suffering adversity-related injuries. Dr Annie Herbert, from UCL Institute of Epidemiology and Healthcare, said: "A huge amount of deaths after adversity-related injury in our study were from suicide or drug or alcohol abuse, which to an extent should be preventable. "More research is needed to find the best way for clinicians to support these children and young people, to reduce risks of future harm after they leave hospital." Professor Ruth Gilbert, from UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, said: "Our findings show the enormous value of using routinely collected patient data to spot opportunities for the NHS to intervene to reduce the risk of harm for vulnerable patients, many of whom come back to hospital time and again."


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

For the first time, researchers of the University of Zurich and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich have demonstrated the causal context of why deep sleep is important to the learning efficiency of the human brain. They have developed a new, non-invasive method for modulating deep sleep in humans in a targeted region of the brain. Most people know from their own experience that just a single sleepless night can lead to difficulty in mastering mental tasks the next day. Researchers assume that deep sleep is essential for maintaining the learning efficiency of the human brain in the long term. While we are awake, we constantly receive impressions from our environment, whereby numerous connections between the nerve cells -- so-called synapses -- are excited and intensified at times. The excitation of the synapses does not normalize again until we fall asleep. Without a recovery phase, many synapses remain maximally excited, which means that changes in the system are no longer possible: Learning efficiency is blocked. The connection between deep sleep and learning efficiency has long been known and proven. Now, researchers at the University of Zurich (UZH) and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich have been able to demonstrate a causal connection within the human brain for the first time. Reto Huber, professor at the University Children's Hospital Zurich and of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at UZH, and Nicole Wenderoth, professor in the Department of Health Sciences and Technology at the ETH Zurich, have succeeded in manipulating the deep sleep of test subjects in targeted areas. "We have developed a method that lets us reduce the sleep depth in a certain part of the brain and therefore prove the causal connection between deep sleep and learning efficiency," says Reto Huber. In the two-part experiment with six women and seven men, the test subjects had to master three different motoric tasks. The concrete assignment was to learn various sequences of finger movements throughout the day. At night, the brain activity of the test subjects during sleep was monitored by EEG. While the test subjects were able to sleep without disturbance after the learning phase on the first day, their sleep was manipulated in a targeted manner on the second day of the experiment -- using acoustic stimulation during the deep sleep phase. To do so, the researchers localized precisely that part of the brain responsible for learning the abovementioned finger movements, i.e., for the control of motor skills (motor cortex). The test subjects were not aware of this manipulation; to them, the sleep quality of both experimental phases was comparable on the following day. In a second step, researchers tested how the manipulation of deep sleep affected the motoric learning tasks on the following day. Here, they observed how the learning and performance curves of the test subjects changed over the course of the experiment. As expected, the participants were particularly able to learn the motoric task well in the morning. As the day went on, however, the rate of mistakes rose. After sleep, the learning efficiency considerably improved again. This was not the case after the night with the manipulated sleep phase. Here, clear performance losses and difficulties in learning the finger movements were revealed. Learning efficiency was similarly as weak as on the evening of the first day of the experiment. Through the manipulation of the motor cortex, the excitability of the corresponding synapses was not reduced during sleep. "In the strongly excited region of the brain, learning efficiency was saturated and could no longer be changed, which inhibited the learning of motor skills," Nicole Wenderoth explains. In a controlled experiment with the same task assignment, researchers manipulated another region of the brain during sleep. In this case, however, this manipulation had no effect on the learning efficiency of the test subjects. The newly gained knowledge is an important step in researching human sleep. The objective of the scientists is to use this knowledge in clinical studies. "Many diseases manifest in sleep as well, such as epilepsy," Reto Huber explains. "Using the new method, we hope to be able to manipulate those specific brain regions that are directly connected with the disease." This could help improve the condition of affected patients.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

For the first time, researchers of the University of Zurich and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich have demonstrated the causal context of why deep sleep is important to the learning efficiency of the human brain. They have developed a new, non-invasive method for modulating deep sleep in humans in a targeted region of the brain. Most people know from their own experience that just a single sleepless night can lead to difficulty in mastering mental tasks the next day. Researchers assume that deep sleep is essential for maintaining the learning efficiency of the human brain in the long term. While we are awake, we constantly receive impressions from our environment, whereby numerous connections between the nerve cells - so-called synapses - are excited and intensified at times. The excitation of the synapses does not normalize again until we fall asleep. Without a recovery phase, many synapses remain maximally excited, which means that changes in the system are no longer possible: Learning efficiency is blocked. The connection between deep sleep and learning efficiency has long been known and proven. Now, researchers at the University of Zurich (UZH) and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich have been able to demonstrate a causal connection within the human brain for the first time. Reto Huber, professor at the University Children's Hospital Zurich and of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at UZH, and Nicole Wenderoth, professor in the Department of Health Sciences and Technology at the ETH Zurich, have succeeded in manipulating the deep sleep of test subjects in targeted areas. "We have developed a method that lets us reduce the sleep depth in a certain part of the brain and therefore prove the causal connection between deep sleep and learning efficiency," says Reto Huber. In the two-part experiment with six women and seven men, the test subjects had to master three different motoric tasks. The concrete assignment was to learn various sequences of finger movements throughout the day. At night, the brain activity of the test subjects during sleep was monitored by EEG. While the test subjects were able to sleep without disturbance after the learning phase on the first day, their sleep was manipulated in a targeted manner on the second day of the experiment - using acoustic stimulation during the deep sleep phase. To do so, the researchers localized precisely that part of the brain responsible for learning the abovementioned finger movements, i.e., for the control of motor skills (motor cortex). The test subjects were not aware of this manipulation; to them, the sleep quality of both experimental phases was comparable on the following day. In a second step, researchers tested how the manipulation of deep sleep affected the motoric learning tasks on the following day. Here, they observed how the learning and performance curves of the test subjects changed over the course of the experiment. As expected, the participants were particularly able to learn the motoric task well in the morning. As the day went on, however, the rate of mistakes rose. After sleep, the learning efficiency considerably improved again. This was not the case after the night with the manipulated sleep phase. Here, clear performance losses and difficulties in learning the finger movements were revealed. Learning efficiency was similarly as weak as on the evening of the first day of the experiment. Through the manipulation of the motor cortex, the excitability of the corresponding synapses was not reduced during sleep. "In the strongly excited region of the brain, learning efficiency was saturated and could no longer be changed, which inhibited the learning of motor skills," Nicole Wenderoth explains. In a controlled experiment with the same task assignment, researchers manipulated another region of the brain during sleep. In this case, however, this manipulation had no effect on the learning efficiency of the test subjects. The newly gained knowledge is an important step in researching human sleep. The objective of the scientists is to use this knowledge in clinical studies. "Many diseases manifest in sleep as well, such as epilepsy," Reto Huber explains. "Using the new method, we hope to be able to manipulate those specific brain regions that are directly connected with the disease." This could help improve the condition of affected patients. The findings were published in Nature Communications.


News Article | March 14, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Being bullied during childhood should not be taken lightly as it may have long-term health effects. The stress may ride into adulthood and develop into health risks including heart disease and diabetes. The undesirable health effects of chronic stress highlight the bad effects of bullying and there is a need for tackling it with due seriousness, according to Susannah J. Tye of the Mayo Clinic and colleagues. "Once dismissed as an innocuous experience of childhood, bullying is now recognized as having significant psychological effects, particularly with chronic exposure," wrote Tye and team. The research has been published in the Harvard Review of Psychiatry. Bullying is a chronic social stress factor with significant consequences for health, and needs to be addressed early, Tye said, and added that child health professionals need to assess the mental and physical effects of bullying in detail. Bullying has been noted for its linkage with psychiatric disorders, although many are disputing such a linkage. According to Tye, the physical symptoms expressed by bullied children are vital warning signs of bullying. Studies on exposure to chronic stress have reckoned bullying as a "classic form of chronic social stress" impacting physical health. The strain may be coming from physical or mental stress and augmenting "wear and tear" of the body. These strains are called allostatic load reflecting the cumulative impact of biological responses like fighting the stress or evading it by flight response. Tye explained that exposure to short periods of stress is easy to recover and normalcy will be gained gradually. But acute stress will make the allostatic load an overload that becomes too hard to shoulder. This triggers physiological processes inimical to health and affects overall well-being. Inflammatory, metabolic and hormonal responses will flow from chronic stress. In due course, the stress takes a worse turn with physiological changes causing heart disease, diabetes, and depression with many other psychiatric disorders in tow. When the physiological systems are damaged from the pressure of early-life stress, it is natural that epigenetic changes such as variations in gene functioning become inevitable. It has been observed that chronic stress also inhibits the development of psychological skills that sustain resilience and ability to cope with future stress. Tye and colleagues are recommending that bullying and victimization be treated as a "standard component" of clinical care and mental health care. However, the researchers have not established any cause-and-effect relationship in the study. But they are urging future research to study the matter through collaborations with clinical and basic science teams to unveil the relationship between childhood bullying and long-term health effects. The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry also says almost half of all children face school bullying at some point, mainly at primary or secondary school. The estimate is that at least 10 percent of children are victims of regular bullying. The damage of child bullying is that child takes up a restricted view of relationships with other people. The process also injures their self-image and affects the whole life. Bullying hurts emotionally and socially. It also hits schoolwork. Cases of depression and suicidal thoughts have also been reported from childhood bullying. Bullying is essentially intimidation or domination on someone perceived weaker with a bid to establish superiority. Bullying ranges from physical domination to verbal and emotional acts. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Donna A. Poplawski, MD Recognized as a Professional of the Year by Strathmore's Who's Who Worldwide Publication Fair Oaks, CA, May 05, 2017 --( About Donna A. Poplawski, MD Dr. Poplawski has over 40 years experience in the healthcare field. She is a Psychiatrist in Sacramento, California. She served with Kaiser Permanente from 1998 through 2015 and has been an independent physician contractor since 2015. Dr. Poplawski specializes in child and adolescent psychiatry. She is affiliated with the A.A.C.A.P. Born in Warsaw, Poland, Dr. Poplawski obtained a M.D. from Akademia Medyczna in Poland in 1973. She did her Internship and Residency at the University of Iowa in 1996, and a Fellowship at the University of California, Davis in 1998. She is Certified in Internal Medicine, Internal Care and Anesthesia in Poland. Dr. Poplawski is a Diplomate of the American Boards of Adult Psychiatry and Neurology, and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Neurology. Dr. Poplawski began her medical career in Poland and then spent 10 years under medical contract in Africa. She is extremely dedicated to working with and helping children and their families in the U.S. In her spare time she enjoys raising and showing Alpacas, reading, travel and theatre. Dr. Poplawki states “..live with dreams..”. About Strathmore’s Who’s Who Worldwide Strathmore’s Who’s Who Worldwide is an international advertising, networking and publishing company based in Farmingdale, New York. They are proud to be able to satisfy their clients and continue to have repeat clientele due to their longevity and pride in their products and services. The Owners strive to connect business professionals to enhance their contact base and networking capabilities so they can get the acknowledgment and publicity within their industries and beyond. The Strathmore family has been providing these valuable services for over two decades. They target executives and professionals in all industries to be featured in their publication and on-line directory. Industries include business, law, education, healthcare and medicine, fine arts, IT, government, science, real estate, entertainment and many more accomplished fields. Professional profiles are listed in an annual hardcover journal and in a detailed, searchable database on the website www.strww.com. Fair Oaks, CA, May 05, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Donna A. Poplawski, MD of Fair Oaks, California has been recognized as a Professional of the Year for 2017 by Strathmore’s Who’s Who Worldwide for her outstanding contributions and achievements for over 40 years in the field of healthcare.About Donna A. Poplawski, MDDr. Poplawski has over 40 years experience in the healthcare field. She is a Psychiatrist in Sacramento, California. She served with Kaiser Permanente from 1998 through 2015 and has been an independent physician contractor since 2015. Dr. Poplawski specializes in child and adolescent psychiatry. She is affiliated with the A.A.C.A.P.Born in Warsaw, Poland, Dr. Poplawski obtained a M.D. from Akademia Medyczna in Poland in 1973. She did her Internship and Residency at the University of Iowa in 1996, and a Fellowship at the University of California, Davis in 1998. She is Certified in Internal Medicine, Internal Care and Anesthesia in Poland. Dr. Poplawski is a Diplomate of the American Boards of Adult Psychiatry and Neurology, and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Neurology.Dr. Poplawski began her medical career in Poland and then spent 10 years under medical contract in Africa. She is extremely dedicated to working with and helping children and their families in the U.S. In her spare time she enjoys raising and showing Alpacas, reading, travel and theatre.Dr. Poplawki states “..live with dreams..”.About Strathmore’s Who’s Who WorldwideStrathmore’s Who’s Who Worldwide is an international advertising, networking and publishing company based in Farmingdale, New York. They are proud to be able to satisfy their clients and continue to have repeat clientele due to their longevity and pride in their products and services. The Owners strive to connect business professionals to enhance their contact base and networking capabilities so they can get the acknowledgment and publicity within their industries and beyond. The Strathmore family has been providing these valuable services for over two decades. They target executives and professionals in all industries to be featured in their publication and on-line directory. Industries include business, law, education, healthcare and medicine, fine arts, IT, government, science, real estate, entertainment and many more accomplished fields. Professional profiles are listed in an annual hardcover journal and in a detailed, searchable database on the website www.strww.com. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Strathmore Worldwide


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

TEL AVIV, Israel, March 01, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Alcobra Ltd. (NasdaqGM:ADHD), an emerging pharmaceutical company focused on the development of new medications to treat central nervous system and cognitive disorders, today announced that it will host an investor forum on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 from 8:00-9:30 a.m. EST in New York City. The forum will feature several experts in the field of prescription medication abuse and the treatment and management of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In addition, Alcobra’s executive management team will provide an evidence-based overview of the commercial potential for its proprietary Abuse-Deterrent, Amphetamine Immediate Release product candidate called ADAIR. At the forum, Dr. Timothy Wilens and Dr. Stephen Faraone will provide a general overview and answer questions regarding prescription medication abuse and the treatment and management of ADHD. Timothy Wilens, M.D. is chief, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and co-director Center for Addiction Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). He is also associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School in Boston.  His residency in child, adolescent, adult, and addiction psychiatry was completed at MGH under the auspices of Harvard Medical School. Dr. Wilens' research interests include the relationship among attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), bipolar disorder and substance use disorders, and the pharmacotherapy of ADHD across the lifespan. Stephen Faraone, Ph.D., vice president of the World Federation of ADHD, studies the nature and causes of mental disorders in childhood. In 2014, 2015 and 2016 Thompson Reuters named Dr. Faraone one of the world’s most highly cited scholars in the fields of psychiatry and psychology. He is an author on over 800 journal articles, editorials, chapters and books, his research interests include genetics, biomarker development, psychopharmacology and research methodology. Dr. Faraone is editor for the journal Neuropsychiatric Genetics and also deputy editor for the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. The event will be webcast live beginning at 8:00 a.m. EST. The webcast and accompanying presentation materials will be accessible live and archived on the Investor Relations section of Alcobra’s website at www.alcobra-pharma.com, the content of which is not incorporated herein by reference. To attend the event in person, please contact the company at ir@alcobra-pharma.com. About ADAIR Alcobra's Abuse-Deterrent Amphetamine Immediate-Release (ADAIR) product candidate is a proprietary, abuse-deterrent oral formulation of immediate-release (short-acting) dextroamphetamine that is currently under development for the treatment of ADHD. ADAIR is being specifically designed to limit abuse by snorting or injecting. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reported recently that approximately five million people misuse or abuse prescription stimulants annually in the US, with studies reporting that 40 percent or more do so by snorting or injecting these products. The ADAIR formulation was developed in close collaboration with Capsugel, a global leader in delivering high-quality, innovative dosage forms and solutions. About Alcobra Alcobra Ltd. is an emerging pharmaceutical company primarily focused on the development and commercialization of medications to treat CNS and cognitive disorders. For more information, please visit the company's website, www.alcobra-pharma.com, the content of which is not incorporated herein by reference.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Emotions are not innately programmed into our brains, but, in fact, are cognitive states resulting from the gathering of information, New York University Professor Joseph LeDoux and Richard Brown, a professor at the City University of New York, conclude in the latest issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "We argue that conscious experiences, regardless of their content, arise from one system in the brain," explains LeDoux, a professor in New York University's Center for Neural Science. "Specifically, the differences between emotional and non-emotional states are the kinds of inputs that are processed by a general cortical network of cognition, a network essential for conscious experiences." As a result, LeDoux and Brown observe, "the brain mechanisms that give rise to conscious emotional feelings are not fundamentally different from those that give rise to perceptual conscious experiences." Their paper--"A Higher-Order Theory of Emotional Consciousness"--addresses a notable gap in neuroscience theory. While emotions, or feelings, are the most significant events in our lives, there has been relatively little integration of theories of emotion and emerging theories of consciousness in cognitive science. Existing work posits that emotions are innately programmed in the brain's subcortical circuits. As a result, emotions are often treated as different from cognitive states of consciousness, such as those related to the perception of external stimuli. In other words, emotions aren't a response to what our brain takes in from our observations, but, rather, are intrinsic to our makeup. However, after taking into account existing scholarship on both cognition and emotion, LeDoux and Brown see a quite different architecture for emotions--one more centered on process than on composition. They conclude that emotions are "higher-order states" embedded in cortical circuits. Therefore, unlike present theories, they see emotional states as similar to other states of consciousness. LeDoux, the founder of the Emotional Brain Institute who also has an appointment in NYU's Department of Psychology, has worked on emotion and memory in the brain for more than 20 years. He is also a professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at NYU Langone Medical Center. Brown is a professor of philosophy at the City University of New York's LaGuardia College.

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