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de Schipper E.,Karolinska InstitutetStockholm Sweden | Mahdi S.,Karolinska InstitutetStockholm Sweden | Granlund M.,CHILD | Holtmann M.,Ruhr University Bochum | And 5 more authors.
Autism Research | Year: 2016

Objective: This study is the second of four to prepare International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF; and Children and Youth version, ICF(-CY)) Core Sets for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).The objective of this study was to survey the opinions and experiences of international experts on functioning and disability in ASD. Methods: Using a protocol stipulated by the World Health Organization (WHO) and monitored by the ICF Research Branch, an email-based questionnaire was circulated worldwide among ASD experts, and meaningful functional ability and disability concepts were extracted from their responses. These concepts were then linked to the ICF(-CY) by two independent researchers using a standardized linking procedure. Results: N=225 experts from 10 different disciplines and all six WHO-regions completed the survey. Meaningful concepts from the responses were linked to 210 ICF(-CY) categories. Of these, 103 categories were considered most relevant to ASD (i.e., identified by at least 5% of the experts), of which 37 were related to Activities and Participation, 35 to Body functions, 22 to Environmental factors, and 9 to Body structures. A variety of personal characteristics and ASD-related functioning skills were provided by experts, including honesty, loyalty, attention to detail and creative talents. Reported gender differences in ASD comprised more externalizing behaviors among males and more internalizing behaviors in females. Conclusion: The ICF(-CY) categories derived from international expert opinions indicate that the impact of ASD on functioning extends far beyond core symptom domains. © 2016 The Authors Autism Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Gee B.,University of East Anglia | Notley C.,University of East Anglia | Byrne R.,Psychosis Research Unit Greater Manchester West Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust Manchester UK | Clarke T.,Child | And 3 more authors.
Early Intervention in Psychiatry | Year: 2016

Aim: The PRODIGY trial is an ongoing randomized controlled trial of Social Recovery Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (SRCBT), a new intervention designed to improve social functioning in young people at risk of long-term social disability due to severe and complex mental health problems. The aim of this qualitative sub-study was to understand trial participants' experiences of SRCBT and the control condition, treatment as usual. Methods: Trial participants were aged 16-25years with socially disabling severe and complex mental health problems. A purposive sample of trial participants took part in in-depth qualitative interviews which were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Results: Participants from the SRCBT arm valued the relationship with their therapist, the flexibility of intervention delivery and the cognitive and behavioural techniques taught. They viewed SRCBT as challenging but worthwhile. Participants from the treatment as usual arm reported receiving little support, both prior to and during their participation in the trial. Participants from both arms valued opportunities to talk about their difficulties during trial participation. Increased activity was an important goal of participants from both arms and most expressed high motivation and little hopelessness. Conclusions: Currently available services do not meet the needs of some young people with socially disabling mental health problems. Motivation to change appears high at this early stage of disorder, supporting the potential value of intervening early to prevent longer term social disability. SRCBT was well accepted by participants and so is a promising intervention to meet this objective. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.


Swadi H.,Child | Bobier C.,Princess Margaret Hospital | Price L.,Princess Margaret Hospital | Craig B.,Princess Margaret Hospital
Australasian Psychiatry | Year: 2010

Objectives: The aim of this paper was to determine if patients undergoing treatment at an older adolescent inpatient unit receive psychoeducation according to the unit philosophy of providing timely and pertinent information regarding illness/diagnosis, medication, diet, outpatient follow-up, and alcohol/ drug use. Methods: Data were gathered prospectively as part of a quality assurance initiative at the Christchurch Youth Inpatient Unit. Patients were interviewed by a registered nurse using a structured audit tool. Results: Participants reported receiving adequate information on medication and illness, and most received information on outpatient follow-up and alcohol and drug use. However, the majority reported a lack of information/ advice about diet. Patients' reported awareness of relapse prevention and the relationship of alcohol and other drugs use to medication and treatment was lower than expected. Conclusions: The audit highlighted areas of discrepancy between information staff believed they had delivered and information youth perceived as received. Psychiatric staff working with young people need be aware of the timing, language and mode of delivery of psychoeducation to enable their patients to 'take in' the information provided. © 2010 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists.


Maxwell G.,CHILD | Maxwell G.,Jönköping University College | Augustine L.,CHILD | Augustine L.,Jönköping University College | And 3 more authors.
Developmental Neurorehabilitation | Year: 2012

Background: Participation as involvement in a situation includes two dimensions; doing the activity and the experience of involvement. Objectives: The ICF-CY only measures doing using the capacity and performance qualifiers, a dimension measuring the experience is needed; a third qualifier. Hypothesis: The experienced involvement of pupils in school activities is higher when thinking and doing coincided. Methods: By comparing self-reported experiences of involvement of children, data about what children were thinking and doing during activities were gathered from 21 children with and 19 without disabilities in inclusive classrooms. Results: A relationship exists between an index of the subjective experience of involvement and whether children were thinking and doing the same things. Conclusion: This index can be constructed using measures of concentration, control, involvement, and motivation. Choice is influential, as knowledge about why an activity is undertaken affects involvement. Additionally, increased subjective experience of involvement gives better psychological health and well-being. © 2012 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted.


PubMed | Child
Type: Evaluation Studies | Journal: Australasian psychiatry : bulletin of Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists | Year: 2010

The aim of this paper was to determine if patients undergoing treatment at an older adolescent inpatient unit receive psychoeducation according to the unit philosophy of providing timely and pertinent information regarding illness/diagnosis, medication, diet, outpatient follow-up, and alcohol/ drug use.Data were gathered prospectively as part of a quality assurance initiative at the Christchurch Youth Inpatient Unit. Patients were interviewed by a registered nurse using a structured audit tool.Participants reported receiving adequate information on medication and illness, and most received information on outpatient follow-up and alcohol and drug use. However, the majority reported a lack of information/ advice about diet. Patients reported awareness of relapse prevention and the relationship of alcohol and other drugs use to medication and treatment was lower than expected.The audit highlighted areas of discrepancy between information staff believed they had delivered and information youth perceived as received. Psychiatric staff working with young people need be aware of the timing, language and mode of delivery of psychoeducation to enable their patients to take in the information provided.

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