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Chicago Ridge, IL, United States

Minser J.,Chicago Transit Authority | Webb V.,Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Transportation Research Record | Year: 2010

This paper provides a demonstration of potential applications of customer loyalty modeling in the public transportation industry. Customer loyalty modeling investigates the cumulative effects of influencing factors on customers' tendencies to choose one service or product over another for a particular need. Industries, such as airlines and telecommunications, model customer loyalty extensively to better understand and improve customer retention. A review of the literature returned only one direct application of this approach in the public transportation industry. The influencing factors of public transportation customer loyalty are explored with the use of structural equation modeling and other empirical tests to demonstrate the appropriateness of this application. A comprehensive set of hypotheses explores the relationships between public image, problem experience, service quality, service value, customer satisfaction, and customer loyalty. Initial findings suggest that service quality and customer satisfaction positively and directly influence customer loyalty. In addition, public image and problem experience exert a stronger influence on service quality, customer satisfaction, and service value than initially predicted. Recommendations and managerial implications based on experiences and challenges during the research are offered for this technique. Source


Trademark
Chicago Transit Authority | Date: 2012-05-03

Computer application software for mobile phones, tablet computers, PDAs, and personal electronic devices, namely, software for use in electronic payments and transactions.


Vv

Trademark
Chicago Transit Authority | Date: 2012-05-04

General purpose reloadable prepaid magnetic cards for transit fare services and general consumer merchandise; prepaid magnetic cards for transit fare services and general consumer merchandise; debit cards; computer application software for mobile phones, tablet computers, PDAs, and personal electronic devices, namely, software for use in electronic payments and transactions; multi-functional electronic payment computer terminals and computer kiosks.


Trademark
Chicago Transit Authority | Date: 2012-05-03

General purpose reloadable prepaid magnetic cards for transit fare services and general consumer merchandise; prepaid magnetic cards for transit fare services and general consumer merchandise; debit cards; software for processing electronic payments; multi-functional electronic payment computer terminals and computer kiosks. Pre-paid card services, namely, processing electronic payments made through prepaid cards; prepaid card services; debit card services; Providing a website featuring reloadable pre-paid and debit card services. Providing a website featuring technology that allows users to purchase and reload pre-paid cards and debit cards.


News Article | February 3, 2016
Site: http://cleantechnica.com

Following the recent and positive completion of an electric bus trial program, the Chicago Transit Authority has committed to purchasing a fleet of 20 to 30 electric buses over the next few years, according to recent reports. The Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) first took delivery of electric buses — two of them — back in October 2014 for the aforementioned testing process. Things seem to have gone well enough — with no significant mechanical issues being reported since then — that the authority has decided to slowly transition to the new modality. The two buses that have been in service since 2014 are 40-foot models from New Flyer Industries — each outfitted with 300-kilowatt-hour (kWh) lithium-ion battery packs, allowing for a range of around 80 miles per full-charge. The pair have already carried around 100,000 passengers on 13 routes — racking up 25,000 in-service miles. The buses’ battery packs are intended to last their entire service lives — meaning about 12 years. Officials claim the emissions reductions from operating the two buses is the equivalent of removing 14 internal-combustion cars from the road, and adds up to $39,000 in health-benefit savings. In an “average year of use,” the CTA expects each bus to save $25,000 in fuel, and $55,000 in public-health costs. The agency will issue a request for proposals later this year, for both additional 40-foot electric buses and charging stations that will be placed along their routes. The newly announced fleet purchase is expected to run $30 to $40 million, with federal funding support contributing to some degree. The CTA will reportedly still operate diesel-electric hybrids for some time — and some diesel buses will be outfitted with particulate filters, it should be noted.    Get CleanTechnica’s 1st (completely free) electric car report → “Electric Cars: What Early Adopters & First Followers Want.”   Come attend CleanTechnica’s 1st “Cleantech Revolution Tour” event → in Berlin, Germany, April 9–10.   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.   James Ayre 's background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy. You can follow his work on Google+.

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