Chiba, Japan
Chiba, Japan

Chiba University and it is also abbreviated as Chibadai is a national university in the city of Chiba, Japan. It offers Doctoral degrees in education as part of a coalition with Tokyo Gakugei University, Saitama University, and Yokohama National University. The university was formed in 1949 from existing educational institutions in Chiba Prefecture, and absorbed over a period of years Chiba Medical University , a preparatory department of the Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Chiba Normal School , Tokyo Polytechnic High School , Chiba Horticultural High School, and others. Chiba University was reincorporated in 2010 under the National University Corporation Act. Chiba University has been ranked 75th on the Asia University Rankings 2013 Top 100 by "The Times Higher Education".Currently, Chiba University consists of nine faculties, the university library, the university hospital and other educational and research facilities. With 11,179 students in the undergraduate program, it has long been one of the largest universities in Japan. As for the graduate school, there are about 2,354 students in ten master's programs and 1,220 in nine doctoral programs.Chiba University is proud of its productive faculties and varied courses, the particulars of which will be introduced in the following sections. The University's four campuses, Nishi-Chiba, Inohana, Matsudo, and Kashiwanoha are ideally located in Chiba Prefecture, an area noted for its industrial, intellectual and international achievements. In recent decades Chiba has undergone rapid development which in many ways rivals the neighboring Tokyo Metropolis. Many national projects have been based in Chiba Prefecture, and now Chiba has one of the main international transport centers and one of the largest business centers in Japan . Many new academic and industrial complexes for the advanced science are located in Chiba Prefecture. The developments in Chiba today are representative of tomorrow's Japan. Matters occurring in the most progressive parts of Japan, or even in the world, will provide rich materials for research in various aspects of the human, social, industrial and natural science.Chiba University has achieved a high degree of participation in international cooperative research projects. Chiba University presently has a large body of international research scholars and students studying on its various campuses. As of 2009, there are approximately 477 international researcher and 957 international students. Starting October, 1996, Chiba University launched a one-year scholarship program designed to provide international students with the opportunity to take courses in English. Wikipedia.


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An object of the present invention is to provide a film which has high visibility in solid state and a product which has the film, with simple material composition. One aspect of the present invention is a film which comprises a core-shell particle which has a core and a shell which covers the core. Moreover, another aspect of the present invention is a product which is covered with the film. Further, another aspect of the present invention is a solution in which core-shell particles are dispersed. Hereby, the present invention is possible to realize a film which has high visibility in solid state and a product which has the film, with simple material composition.


A method for quantitatively evaluating chromatin structural changes using pixel imaging of the nucleus is provided. Pixel imaging of the nucleus can include capturing one or more images of a nucleus of one or more nucleic acid stain treated cells. The stain intensity can be measured by quantitating the intensity. The mean and/or standard deviation of stain intensity per pixel can be used to determine chromatin condensation levels or chromatin structural change.


Patent
Olympus Corporation and Chiba University | Date: 2016-10-28

Provided is an image processing apparatus including a transformation unit that is configured to deform images so that corresponding points in a plurality of images obtained from several viewpoints with respect to the same subject are matched; a separating unit that is configured to separate specular-reflection components from the plurality of images transformed by the transformation unit and create an image from which the specular-reflection component is removed; and an image reconstructing unit that is configured to combine at least one of the specular-reflection components of the plurality of images, separated by the separating unit, and the image from which the specular-reflection component is removed.


Patent
Advanced Healthcare Co. and Chiba University | Date: 2017-01-25

This invention provides a simple projector system that can be operated by a user who is not an expert of image processing technology. The projector system comprises a projector (1), a personal computer (2), a mouse (3), and a calibration board (4). A checker flag pattern is added to the calibration board (4), and an intersection point serves as a marker. A cursor, which is projected from the projector (1) onto the calibration board (4), is used as an intuitive input interface. An operator, while seeing the cursor, operates the mouse (3), thereby placing the cursor onto the calibration marker. In this state, the operator clicks the mouse (3), thereby selecting the calibration marker. The operator then acquires the corresponding projection image coordinates on the basis of the selection instruction.


Patent
Chiba University and Surgical Alliance Inc. | Date: 2015-07-21

[Problem] To provide a system for installing and storing a traction operating table for lower limb joint surgery, the system enabling a traction operating table for lower limb joint surgery to be more easily installed on an operating table main body. [Solution] A traction operating table for lower limb joint surgery according to an aspect of the present invention comprises: a main frame part provided with a main frame having two rod-shaped members; a position adjusting part provided with a moving frame that is movable, and a foot fixing portion for fixing a foot; and a supporting leg part joined to the position adjusting part to support the main frame part, and capable of adjusting the incline of the main frame part. The position adjusting part includes a grip portion cap able of setting, by one gripping action, a first mode in which a moving action along the main frame and an incline adjusting action of the supporting leg part are fixed; a second mode in which the moving action along the main frame is released and the incline adjusting action of the supporting leg part is fixed; and a third mode in which the moving action along the main frame and the incline adjusting action of the supporting leg part are released.


Patent
Advanced Healthcare Co. and Chiba University | Date: 2014-12-10

This invention provides a simple projector system that can be operated by a user who is not an expert of image processing technology. The projector system comprises a projector (1), a personal computer (2), a mouse (3), and a calibration board (4). A checker flag pattern is added to the calibration board (4), and an intersection point serves as a marker. A cursor, which is projected from the projector (1) onto the calibration board (4), is used as an intuitive input interface. An operator, while seeing the cursor, operates the mouse (3), thereby placing the cursor onto the calibration marker. In this state, the operator clicks the mouse (3), thereby selecting the calibration marker. The operator then acquires the corresponding projection image coordinates on the basis of the selection instruction.


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: cerncourier.com

On 4 April, CERN alumnus Tim Berners-Lee received the 2016 A M Turing Award for his invention of the World Wide Web, the first web browser, and the fundamental protocols and algorithms allowing the web to scale. Named in honour of British mathematician and computer scientist Alan Turing, and often referred to as the Nobel prize of computing, the annual award of $1 million is given by the Association for Computing Machinery. In 1989, while working at CERN, Berners-Lee wrote a proposal for a new information-management system for the laboratory, and by the end of the following year he had invented one of the most influential computing innovations in history – the World Wide Web. Berners-Lee is now a professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Oxford, and director of the World Wide Web Consortium and the World Wide Web Foundation. The International Centre for Theoretical Physics 2016 Dirac Medal has been awarded to Nathan Seiberg of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and Mikhail Shifman and Arkady Vainshtein of the University of Minnesota. The award recognises the trio’s important contributions to field theories in the non-perturbative regime and in particular for exact results obtained in supersymmetric field theories. The second edition of the Guido Altarelli Award, given to young scientists in the field of deep inelastic scattering and related subjects, was awarded to two researchers during the 2017 Deep Inelastic Scattering workshop held in Birmingham, UK, on 3 April. Maria Ubiali of Cambridge University in the UK was recognised for her theoretical contributions in the field of proton parton density functions, and in particular for her seminal contributions to the understanding of heavy-quark dynamics. Experimentalist Paolo Gunnellini of DESY, who is a member of the CMS collaboration, received the award for his innovative ideas in the study of double parton scattering and in Monte Carlo tuning. Four members of the IceCube neutrino observatory, based at the South Pole, have independently won awards recognising their contributions to the field. Aya Ishihara of Chiba University in Japan was awarded the 37th annual Saruhashi Prize, given each year to a female scientist under the age of 50 for exceptional research accomplishments. This year’s prize, presented in Tokyo on 27 May, cites Ishihara’s contributions to high-energy astronomy with the IceCube detector. Fellow IceCube collaborator Subir Sarkar of the University of Oxford, UK, and the Niels Bohr Institute in Denmark has won the 4th Homi Bhabha prize. Awarded since 2010 by the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) in India and the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics, the prize recognises an active scientist who has made distinguished contributions in the field of high-energy cosmic-ray and astroparticle physics over an extended academic career. Sarkar has also worked on the Pierre Auger Observatory and is a member of the Cherenkov Telescope Array collaboration. Meanwhile, former IceCube spokesperson Christian Spiering from DESY has won the O’Ceallaigh Medal for astroparticle physics, awarded every second year by the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies. Spiering, who led the collaboration from 2005 to 2007 and also played a key role in the Lake Baikal Neutrino Telescope, was honoured “for his outstanding contributions to cosmic-ray physics and to the newly emerging field of neutrino astronomy in particular”. Both he and Sarkar will receive their awards at the 35th International Cosmic Ray Conference in Busan, South Korea, on 13 July. Finally, IceCube member Ben Jones of the University of Texas at Arlington has won the APS 2017 Mitsuyoshi Tanaka Dissertation Award in Experimental Particle Physics, for his thesis “Sterile Neutrinos in Cold Climates”. An awards ceremony took place at CERN on 3 April recognising companies that have won contracts to start building the prototype phase of the Helix Nebula Science Cloud (HNSciCloud). Initiated by CERN in 2016, HNSciCloud is a €5.3 million pre-commercial procurement tender driven by 10 leading research organisations and funded by the European Commission. Its aim is to establish a European cloud platform to support high-performance computing and big-data capabilities for scientific research. The April event marked the official beginning of the prototype phase, which covers the procurement of R&D services for the design, prototype development and pilot use of innovative cloud services. The three winning consortia are: T-Systems, Huawei, Cyfronet and Divia; IBM; and RHEA Group, T-Systems, Exoscale and SixSq. Each presented its plans to build the HNSciCloud prototype and the first deliverables are expected by the end of the year, after which two consortia will proceed to the pilot phase in 2018. The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) organised a specialised course devoted to beam injection, extraction and transfer in Erice, Sicily, from 10 to 19 March. The course was held in the Ettore Majorana Foundation and Centre, and was attended by 72 participants from 25 countries including China, Iran, Russia and the US. The intensive programme comprised 32 lectures and two seminars, with 10 hours of case studies allowing students to apply their knowledge to real problems. Following introductory talks on electromagnetism, relativity and the basics of beam dynamics, different injection and extraction schemes were presented. Detailed lectures about the special magnetic and electrostatic elements for the case of lepton and hadron beams followed. State-of-the-art kicker and septa designs were discussed, as were issues related to stripping-injection and resonant extraction as used in medical settings. An overview of optics measurements in storage rings and non-periodic structures completed the programme, with talks about the production of secondary and radioactive beams and exotic injection methods. The next CAS course, focusing on advanced accelerator physics, will take place at Royal Holloway University in the UK from 3–15 September. Later in the year, CAS is participating in a joint venture in collaboration with the accelerator schools of the US, Japan and Russia. This school is devoted to RF technologies and will be held in Japan from 16–26 October. Looking further ahead, schools are currently planned in 2018 on accelerator physics at the introductory level, on future colliders and on beam instrumentation and diagnostics. See https://www.cern.ch/schools/CAS. Around 100 participants from 15 countries attended the 2017 Testing Gravity Conference at the Simon Fraser University, Harbour Centre, in Vancouver, Canada, on 25 to 28 January. The conference, the second such meeting following the success of the 2015 event, brought together experts exploring new ways to test general relativity (GR). GR, and its Newtonian limit, work very well in most circumstances. But gaps in our understanding appear when the theory is applied to extremely small distances, where quantum mechanics reigns, or extremely large distances, when we try to describe the universe. Advancing technologies across all areas of physics open up opportunities for testing gravity in new ways, thus helping to fill these gaps. The conference brought together renowned cosmologists, astrophysicists, and atomic, nuclear and particle physicists to share their specific approaches to test GR and to explore ways to address long-standing mysteries, such as the unexplained nature of dark matter and dark energy. Among the actively discussed topics were the breakthrough discovery in February 2016 of gravitational waves by the LIGO observatory, which has opened up exciting opportunities for testing GR in detail (CERN Courier January/February 2017 p34), and the growing interest in gravity tests among the CERN physics community – specifically regarding attempting to measure the gravitational force on antihydrogen with three experiments at CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator (CERN Courier January/February 2017 p39). Among other highlights there were fascinating talks from pioneers in their fields, including cosmologist Misao Sasaki, one of the fathers of inflationary theory; Eric Adelberger, a leader in gravity tests at short distances; and Frans Pretorius, who created the first successful computer simulations of black-hole collisions. This is an exciting time for the field of gravity research. The LIGO–Virgo collaboration is expected to detect many more gravitational-wave events from binary black holes and neutron stars. Meanwhile, a new generation of cosmological probes currently under development, such as Euclid, LSST and SKA, are stimulating theoretical research in their respective domains (CERN Courier May 2017 p19). We are already looking forward to the next Testing Gravity in Vancouver in 2019. On 12 April, CERN hosted the seven-member high-level group of scientific advisers to the European Commission, which provides independent scientific advice on specific policy issues. Led by former CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer, the group toured ATLAS and the AMS Payload Operations Control Centre. On 18 April, Czech minister of health Miloslav Ludvik visited CERN, during which he toured the ALICE experiment and signed the guestbook with head of Member State relations Pippa Wells. Minister for higher education and science in Denmark Søren Pind visited CERN on 25 April, touring the synchrocyclotron, the Antiproton Decelerator, ALICE and ATLAS. Here he is pictured (centre) meeting ATLAS spokesperson Karl Jakobs. Dr Viktoras Pranckietis MP and speaker of the Seimas, Republic of Lithuania, visited CERN on 26 April, taking in CMS, ISOLDE and MEDICIS. He signed the guestbook with senior adviser for Lithuania Tadeusz Kurtyka (left) and director for finance and human resources Martin Steinacher.


Kuwabara S.,Chiba University | Yuki N.,National University of Singapore
The Lancet Neurology | Year: 2013

Acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN) is a pure motor axonal subtype of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) that was identified in the late 1990s. In Asia and Central and South America, it is the major subtype of GBS, seen in 30-65% of patients. AMAN progresses more rapidly and has an earlier peak than demyelinating GBS; tendon reflexes are relatively preserved or even exaggerated, and autonomic dysfunction is rare. One of the main causes is molecular mimicry of human gangliosides by Campylobacter jejuni lipo-oligosaccharides. In addition to axonal degeneration, electrophysiology shows rapidly reversible nerve conduction blockade or slowing, presumably due to pathological changes at the nodes or paranodes. Autoantibodies that bind to GM1 or GD1a gangliosides at the nodes of Ranvier activate complement and disrupt sodium-channel clusters and axoglial junctions, which leads to nerve conduction failure and muscle weakness. Improved understanding of the disease mechanism and pathophysiology might lead to new treatment options and improve the outlook for patients with AMAN. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to fuels using solar energy is an attractive option for simultaneously capturing this major greenhouse gas and solving the shortage of sustainable energy. Efforts to demonstrate the photocatalytic reduction of CO 2 are reviewed herein. Although the photocatalytic results depended on the reaction conditions, such as the incident/absorbing light intensity from the sun or a simulated solar light source, the performance of different systems is compared. When the reactants included CO 2 and water, it was necessary to determine whether the products were derived from CO 2 and not from impurities that accumulated on/in the catalysts as a result of washing, calcination, or pretreatment in a moist environment. Isotope labeling of 13CO 2 was effective for this evaluation using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS). Comparisons are limited to reports in which the reaction route was verified spectroscopically, the C source was traced isotopically, or sufficient kinetic analyses were performed to verify the photocatalytic events. TiO 2 photocatalytically produced methane at the rate of ∼0.1μmolh -1g cat -1. In aqueous solutions, formic acid, formaldehyde, and methanol were also produced. When TiO 2 was atomically dispersed in zeolites or ordered mesoporous SiO 2 and doped with Pt, Cu, N, I, CdSe, or PbS, the methane and CO formation rates were greater, reaching 1-10μmolh -1g cat -1. As for semiconductors other than TiO 2, CdS, SiC, InNbO 4, HNb 3O 8, Bi 2WO 6, promoted NaNbO 3, and promoted Zn 2GeO 4 produced methane or methanol at rates of 1-10μmolh -1g cat -1, and promoted A IILa 4Ti 4O 15 produced CO at a rate greater than 10μmolh -1g cat -1, in addition to the historically known ZnO and GaP (formaldehyde and methanol formation). The photocatalytic reduction of CO 2 was also surveyed with hydrogen, because hydrogen can be obtained from water photosplitting by utilizing natural light. CO was formed at a rate of ∼1μmolh -1g cat -1 using TiO 2, ZrO 2, MgO, and Ga 2O 3, whereas both CO and methanol were formed at a rate of 0.1-1μmolh -1g cat -1 using layered-double hydroxides consisting of Zn, Cu, Al, and Ga. When hydrogen is used, in addition to identifying the origin of the carbon, it is critical to confirm that the products are photocatalytically formed, not thermally produced via CO 2 hydrogenation. The feasibility of the strategy involving the recycling of a sacrificial electron donor and the direct supply of protons and electrons released from water oxidation catalysts to photocatalysts for the reduction of CO 2 to fuels has been demonstrated. However, based on the results obtained to date, it is clear that the practical use of the photocatalytic reduction of CO 2 as one possible solution for global warming and the world's energy problems requires the development of more efficient photocatalysts. © 2012 Elsevier B.V..


Hashimoto K.,Chiba University
Expert Opinion on Therapeutic Targets | Year: 2014

Introduction: Abnormalities in glutamatergic neurotransmission mediated by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) are implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, although the precise mechanisms are unknown. Areas covered: The author examines the role of the NMDA receptor in schizophrenia, focusing on results from preclinical and clinical studies that support the NMDA receptor hypothesis of schizophrenia. The author first reviewed papers detailing alterations in the levels of endogenous substances such as glutamine, glutamate, d-serine, l-serine, kynurenic acid and glutathione (GSH), all of which can affect NMDA receptor function. Next, the author reviewed clinical findings for glycine, d-serine, d-cycloserine, d-amino acid oxidase inhibitors (e.g., sodium benzoate) and glycine transporter-1 inhibitors (e.g., sarcosine, bitopertin), as potential therapeutic drugs. In addition, the author outlined how oxidative stress associated with decreased levels of the endogenous antioxidant GSH may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Finally, the author reviewed N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a precursor of GSH and an activator of the cystine-glutamate antiporter, as a potential therapeutic drug. Expert opinion: Given the NMDA receptor hypothesis of schizophrenia, the glycine modulatory site on NMDA receptors is the most attractive therapeutic target for this disease. In addition, both the kynurenine pathway and cystine-glutamate antiporter represent credible potential therapeutic targets for schizophrenia. © 2014 Informa UK, Ltd.

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