Chiba, Japan

Chiba Institute of Technology is a private university in Narashino, Chiba, Japan. abbreviated as Chiba kōdai ,Chiba kō ,kōdai ,sen kōdai .The school was founded in 1942 in Machida, Tokyo. In 1946 it was relocated to Kimitsu, Chiba, adopted the present name at the same time. Four years later, it was moved to the present location. It is the oldest private technical university in Japan. Wikipedia.


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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: techcrunch.com

Six years ago, a massive earthquake, consequent tsunami and nuclear crisis struck Japan. International organizations rushed to help the country’s devastated residents, and to figure out how to clean up Fukushima Daiichi, the wrecked nuclear power plant. Robots offered a ray of hope amid unfathomable loss. At least they did, until recently. As the Asahi Shimbun reported yesterday, members of Japan’s Nuclear Regulation Authority are now urging plant operators Tokyo Electric Power Company to find new technology and methods to aid in the cleanup. Robots keep getting fried on their missions, literally from radiation damage, or stranded on-site wasting precious money and time. The implication is that, perhaps, the clean up will move faster if Tepco’s energy and the government’s money is redirected to chemistry, biology, and so-called “safe containment,” building some sort of structure around Fukushima Daiichi like the “sarcophagus” around Chernobyl. Or perhaps humans need to trust AI to move robots through some of their tasks. All of the robots deployed in the cleanup effort have been remote-operated by humans, so far. The government watchdog’s critical comments followed the latest robo-fail revealed by Tepco. On March 23 the company said it had attempted to send a survey robot into a containment vessel to find fuel debris, information it needs to decommission the plant. But the PMORPH survey robot, developed by Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy and the International Research Institute for Nuclear Decommissioning (IRID), couldn’t get its cameras to the predetermined location. As a result, it only sent back a partial report. Just one month earlier, Tepco aborted a mission using a Toshiba “scorpion” robot that was built to scramble over rubble, capture images and data inside the plant’s facilities. The robot could tolerate up to 1,000 sieverts of radiation. And yet, it had trouble within the hostile environs of the number 2 reactor where it was dispatched. These followed a string of earlier robot losses at the plant going back to the Quince 1, the first robot to enter the facility after the disaster. Developed by the Chiba Institute of Technology, the International Rescue System Institute, and Tohoku University in Japan, Quince went into the power plant’s reactor 2 building where it measured radiation levels, collected dust samples and video footage. It ran several missions but eventually disconnected from its communications cable and got stranded within the building. This “scorpion robot” was built to investigate inside containment vessels at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. It’s not like anyone thought it would be easy to make robots capable of finding and retrieving molten nuclear fuel, or decommissioning and decontaminating a nuclear power plant. Japanese researchers have been trying to create robots with these capabilities since the 80s, as Timothy Hornyak wrote in the journal Science last year. Robots remain incredibly tantalizing technology. With cameras, dosimeters, and other tools on board, robots can ostensibly go where conditions would prove fatal to humans. If they were strong and agile enough, they might be able to bring core samples up for scientists to test, or find and plug leaks, clear paths and scour away radioactive materials. The ultimate task would be for robots to identify and retrieve some 600 tons of molten nuclear fuel and debris from Fukushima. Despite the nuclear watchdog’s most recent admonition, many robots, even the fried ones, have been helpful in what little progress has been made in cleaning up the site. Early on, iRobot’s ground-based PackBot and Warrior robots, and Honeywell’s T-Hawk drones helped TEPCO get a handle on radioactivity and conditions around its facilities, including around damaged reactors within weeks of the disaster. Swimming and crawling robots, also developed by Hitachi and GE Nuclear energy, were used in a 2014 mission to capture images and readings from within a damaged reactor. Still, with every failed or aborted mission, every $1 million spent, it gets harder to tell people devastated by a crisis that robots are their greatest hope. Japan’s 3/11 crisis killed tens of thousands, left thousands missing and displaced a quarter of a million people. As radiation first gushed from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear plant, millions of residents were left mourning without electricity or water through cold and wet, end-of-winter weather. More than half of those who fled or were evacuated from the area have no plans to come back, even still, according to Japanese government surveys. Scientific studies have concluded that certain areas are safe for residents’ return. But there’s not much in the way of schools, stores or other critical community support around Fukushima, and fears linger.  The Japanese government estimates the cleanup effort will cost $189 billion and will take decades. Let’s hope the next “step change” in technology, whether in robotics or another promising area, will hasten the Fukushima recovery, and prevent nuclear disasters from ever happening again.


Patent
Denso Corporation, Chiba Institute of Technology, Canon Inc. and UACJ Corporation | Date: 2014-04-29

In a method for brazing a sheet material without use of flux, an inert gas is firstly introduced into an oxygen pump to reduce an oxygen partial pressure in the inert gas to 110^(10 )Pa or less, and the sheet material is heated in a brazing furnace in an atmosphere of the inert gas discharged from the oxygen pump. A core alloy of the sheet material or a brazing filler alloy cladded to a surface of the core alloy contains Mg. Both the core alloy and the brazing filler alloy may contain Mg. Accordingly, brazability of the sheet material is sufficiently improved.


Yamazaki K.,Chiba Institute of Technology | Ishigami H.,Chiba Institute of Technology
IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics | Year: 2010

In this paper, we develop novel rotor designs of interior-permanent-magnet motors in order to reduce harmonic iron losses at high rotational speeds under field-weakening control. First, an optimization method, combined with an adaptive finite-element method, is applied to automatically determine the shapes of themagnets and rotor core. The optimized motor ismanufactured to confirm the validity of the calculation. It is clarified that the iron loss of the optimized motor is reduced to nearly half of that of the conventional motor, without a significant decrease in maximum torque. Next, the contribution of each part of the rotor to the iron-loss reduction is analyzed by the experimental design method. Finally, several designs of the rotors are proposed from the viewpoints of manufacturing cost and performance. Copyright © 2010 IEEE.


Kamino K.,Chiba Institute of Technology
Biofouling | Year: 2010

Balanomorphan barnacles attach their calcareous bases to a variety of substrata, including others of the same species, through secretion of an underwater adhesive, commonly referred to as cement. In this multi-functional process of underwater attachment, curing of the adhesive is crucial for the formation of a secure attachment. To date, there has been no direct evidence presented to suggest the involvement of cross-linking or polymerization in the cement curing process, despite the emergence of this hypothesis in the recent literature. A recently proposed mechanism for cement curing involves glutamyl-lysine cross-linking via the action of trans-glutaminase. However, in the opinion of the author, inadequate attention may have been paid to sample collection during the study and the conditions used in the analysis may not be adequate to support the conclusions of the paper. Indeed, further investigation, the results of which are presented here, did not provide any evidence to support adhesive curing via glutamyl-lysine cross-linking. Therefore, the hypothesis that the process of cement curing is similar to the clotting system of barnacle hemolymph is not compatible with the data reported so far. In order to allay any potential confusion, a new definition of the barnacle cement is proposed. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.


A simplified procedure is proposed to predict the largest peak seismic response of an asymmetric building to horizontal bi-directional ground motion, acting at an arbitrary angle of incidence. The main characteristics of the proposed procedure is as follows. (1) The properties of two independent equivalent single-degree-of-freedom models are determined according to the principal direction of the first modal response in each nonlinear stage, rather than according to the fixed axis based on the mode shape in the elastic stage; the principal direction of the first modal response in each nonlinear stage is determined based on pushover analysis results. (2) The bi-directional horizontal seismic input is simulated as identical spectra of the two horizontal components, and the contribution of each modal response is directly estimated based on the unidirectional response in the principal direction of each. (3) The drift demand at each frame is determined based on four pushover analyses considering the combination of bi-directional excitations. In the numerical example, nonlinear time-history analyses of six four-story torsionally stiff (TS) asymmetric buildings are carried out considering various directions of seismic inputs, and these results are compared with the predicted results. The results show that the proposed procedure satisfactorily predicts the largest peak response displacement at the flexible-side frame of a TS asymmetric building. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


Patent
Chiba Institute of Technology and Aisin Seiki | Date: 2015-03-02

A single passenger carrying mobile robot, includes a single operated member that is operated by a passenger to instruct both a moving direction and a moving speed of the passenger carrying mobile robot, a moving member configured to move the passenger carrying mobile robot and a controller configured to control the moving member based on input information input to the operated member by the passenger, wherein the passenger carrying mobile robot further includes a sensor that acquires obstacle information of a surrounding of the passenger carrying mobile robot, and the controller predicts an expected course of the passenger carrying mobile robot based on the input information and determines based on the obstacle information whether or not an obstacle is located in the expected course, and changes a control of the moving member when determining that the obstacle is located.


Patent
Chiba Institute of Technology | Date: 2010-02-04

A car having a rotatable wheel, the car being able to run by rotating the wheel, the car having a leg used by the car for walking, and an attitude stabilization section for stabilizing an attitude of the car.


Patent
Chiba Institute of Technology | Date: 2010-02-04

A car having a rotatable wheel, the car being able to run by rotating the wheel, the car having a leg used by the car for walking, and an attitude stabilization section for stabilizing an attitude of the car.


Patent
Chiba Institute of Technology | Date: 2010-09-10

The present invention aims to produce a safe and reliable medical composition, which efficiently boosts nonspecific immunity of antigen-presenting cells and thereby promotes an antitumor activity. To produce the medical composition, antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells are exposed to an activating reagent containing baculoviruses. Then, the antigen-presenting cells are separated from the activating reagent. The antigen-presenting cells are optionally cultured after the separation. Furthermore, an absence of the baculoviruses in the composition are optionally checked. The medical composition produced by the present invention is expected to have an outstanding therapeutic effect.


Car

Patent
The-Edge and Chiba Institute of Technology | Date: 2010-02-19

A car includes a car body having a bottom portion, a wheel that is rotatable, and a supporting member for supporting the wheel, the supporting member being provided to the bottom portion. At least eight pairs of the wheel and the supporting member are provided. The supporting member has a first supporting portion for supporting the wheel rotatably, a second supporting portion for supporting the first supporting portion so that a direction of the wheel supported by the first supporting portion can be changed, and a turning portion that is rotatable about a rotation axis with its axial direction along a direction orthogonal to the bottom portion, the turning portion being provided to the bottom portion. The turning portion supports the second supporting portion so that a distance between the wheel and the bottom portion can be changed, and a position of the wheel can be moved by a rotation of the turning portion in a state that the distance is maintained.

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