Cheongju, South Korea

Cheongju University

www.cju.ac.kr
Cheongju, South Korea

Cheongju University is a private university located in Cheongju City, the capital of North Chungcheong province, South Korea. The current president is Kim Yoon Bae. Wikipedia.

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Jun S.,Cheongju University
International Journal of Applied Engineering Research | Year: 2016

Social network analysis(SNA) is to analyze social structure comprised of nodeand link. This is based on graph theory of data structure, and has been used in diverse fields such as business, biology, information science, political science, etc. In addition, SNA provides meaningful results of social relations between nodes. In this paper, we propose a methodology for sustainable technology forecasting using SNA and statistics. Each node of social network is a technology, and the link represents the relationship between technologies. We also study on statistical testing of SNA results to get significant SNA outcomesfrom all SNA results. In the significant outcomes, we forecast the sustainable technology using the performance measures of SNA such as centrality, degree, or network density. We carry out a case study to show how our research can be applied to real problem. © Research India Publications.


Patent
Daewoo Engineering&Construction Co., Cheongju University, Doosan Group and Hudigm Architects & Engineers Co. | Date: 2010-09-01

Disclosed is a fire-resistant high performance concrete. This concrete has high impact resistance and includes organic fibers as well as cement, sand, pebbles, water and admixture materials, wherein the organic fibers consist of a relatively high melting point fiber, which is a nylon fiber, and a relatively low melting point fiber, which is a polypropylene fiber, and the low melting point fiber has 1 to 440 times the cross-sectional area and 0.5 to 576 times the volume fraction of the high melting point fiber. Accordingly, the low melting point fiber is first fused in the concrete at a fire outbreak to form an exhaust path for water vapor, and the high melting point fiber is later fused in the concrete by increase in temperature during progress of the fire which in turn forms another exhaust path for the residual water vapor, so that the concrete exhibits excellent spalling prevention effects even when a small amount of fibers is added to the concrete.


Inflammatory responses mediated by macrophages are part of the innate immune system, whose role is to protect against invading pathogens. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria stimulates an inflammatory response by macrophages. During the inflammatory response, extracellular LPS is recognized by Toll-like receptor 4, one of the pattern recognition receptors that activates inflammatory signalling pathways and leads to the production of inflammatory mediators. The innate immune response is also triggered by intracellular inflammasomes, and inflammasome activation induces pyroptosis and the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 by macrophages. Cysteine-aspartic protease (caspase)-11 and the human orthologues caspase-4/caspase-5 were recently identified as components of the 'non-canonical inflammasome' that senses intracellular LPS derived from Gram-negative bacteria during macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses. Direct recognition of intracellular LPS facilitates the rapid oligomerization of caspase-11/4/5, which results in pyroptosis and the secretion of IL-1β and IL-18. LPS is released into the cytoplasm from Gram-negative bacterium-containing vacuoles by small interferon-inducible guanylate-binding proteins encoded on chromosome 3 (GBPchr3)-mediated lysis of the vacuoles. In vivo studies have clearly shown that caspase-11-/- mice are more resistant to endotoxic septic shock by excessive LPS challenge. Given the evidence, activation of caspase-11 non-canonical inflammasomes by intracellular LPS is distinct from canonical inflammasome activation and provides a new paradigm in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


News Article | December 15, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

WASHINGTON (Dec. 15, 2016) -- For the first time, researchers have been able to grow, in a lab, both normal and primary cancerous prostate cells from a patient, and then implant a million of the cancer cells into a mouse to track how the tumor progresses. The achievement, say researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center who led the research, represents a critical advance in the effort to understand the origin and drivers of this puzzling cancer -- the most common in men. The study was published online today in Oncotarget. "This is a new and much-needed platform for prostate cancer research. By matching normal and cancer cells from a patient, we can now study the differences -- what molecules are key to tumor development and growth, and, ultimately, match treatments that might disable this cancer," says the study's senior investigator, associate professor of pathology, Xuefeng Liu, MD, a member of the Center for Cell Reprogramming (CCR) at Georgetown University Medical Center. The breakthrough was possible because the research team used conditional reprogramming (CR), a laboratory technique, developed and described by Liu, Richard Schlegel, MD, PhD, director of the CCR, and their colleagues at Georgetown in 2011, that makes it possible to continuously grow cells in a laboratory indefinitely. The method uses special "feeder" cells and a chemical inhibitor. "This is the only system that can grow healthy and cancer cells as if they were just extracted from a patient, and expand them -- a million new cells can be grown in a week -- as long as needed," he says. The CR method is being developed for a number of uses, such as living biobanks, personalized and regenerative medicine, and this study, using donated tissue from a 57 year-old man who underwent a radical prostatectomy, demonstrates the first steps needed towards those goals in prostate cancer. Previous studies have proven the utility of CR in a variety of tissue types, including breast, lung, and colon cancer. Liu says many labs around the world are now using this technique, which is called "conditional reprogramming." "Prostate cancer is highly heterogenetic -- it is different person to person, can be slow growing or rapidly aggressive, or both over time. We really don't understand the basic biology of prostate cancer and that makes it very difficult to find targeted therapies," Liu says. "The use of matched patient-derived cells provides a unique model for studies of early prostate cancer." In this proof-of-principle study, the researchers showed, using DNA sequencing and karyotyping technologies, that the patient's unique cell characteristics were maintained in both normal and tumor CR laboratory cells. This means nothing genetically changed due to the CR laboratory technique, the researchers say. Investigators also demonstrated the malignant properties of tumor cells compared to the matched normal cells. These are all hallmarks of tumor development, Liu says. "Now we can compare what is different between the patient's normal and cancerous cells, and what changes when the cancer cells are allowed to morph into an advancing tumor," he says. "We will then use this technique to explore prostate tissues from other cancer patients. Comparisons between what happens within an individual patient's tissue, and then between patients, will give us priceless information about how we can best diagnose this baffling disease and treat it appropriately." Study co-authors include Olga A. Timofeeva, PhD, Nancy Palechor-Ceron, DMD, Hang Yuan, PhD, Ewa Krawczyk, PhD, Geeta Upadhyay, PhD, Aleksandra Dakic, PhD, Songtao Yu, MD, Shuang Fang, MD, Sujata Choudhury, PhD, Xueping Zhang, PhD, Yun-Ling Zheng, MD, PhD, Chris Albanese, PhD, Richard Schlegel, MD, PhD, Xiaogang Zhong, PhD, Andrew Ju, MD, and Anatoly Dritschilo, MD, from Georgetown University Medical Center; Guanglei Li, Geng Liu, and Yong Hou from Beijing Genome Research Institute, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China; Myeong-Seon Lee from Cheongju University, the Republic of Korea; Han C Dan, from the University of Maryland; and Youngmi Ji and Johng Rhim, MD, from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland. Georgetown University has pending patent applications in US and internationally for conditional cell reprogramming and has been awarded a US patent by the United States Patent Office (9,279,106). This technology has been licensed exclusively to a company for further development and commercialization. Georgetown University and the inventors (Liu and Schlegel) receive payments and potential royalties from Propagenix. Schlegel is also a co-founder in the company that has a license to this technology. This work was partially supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (R33CA177466, R21CA180524, P30 CA051008, TL1-TR001431), the Department of Defense (PC140268 and W81XWH-13-1-0327), and with internal grant support from Center for Cell Reprogramming at GUMC. Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center is designated by the National Cancer Institute as a comprehensive cancer center -- the only cancer center of its kind in the Washington, DC area. A part of Georgetown University Medical Center and MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Georgetown Lombardi seeks to improve the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cancer through innovative basic and clinical research, patient care, community education and outreach, and the training of cancer specialists of the future. Connect with Georgetown Lombardi on Facebook (Facebook.com/GeorgetownLombardi) and Twitter (@LombardiCancer). Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) is an internationally recognized academic medical center with a three-part mission of research, teaching and patient care (through MedStar Health). GUMC's mission is carried out with a strong emphasis on public service and a dedication to the Catholic, Jesuit principle of cura personalis -- or "care of the whole person." The Medical Center includes the School of Medicine and the School of Nursing & Health Studies, both nationally ranked; Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, designated as a comprehensive cancer center by the National Cancer Institute; and the Biomedical Graduate Research Organization, which accounts for the majority of externally funded research at GUMC including a Clinical and Translational Science Award from the National Institutes of Health. Connect with GUMC on Facebook (Facebook.com/GUMCUpdate), Twitter (@gumedcenter) and Instagram (@gumedcenter).


Patent
Postech Co. and Cheongju University | Date: 2013-06-17

A dual resonance circuit is formed of two transformers, two resonance inductors and two resonance capacitors for a resonance type switching power supply employing parallel connected transformers. The secondary winding of the transformer is configured in a center tap structure, and a top and bottom symmetrical voltage multiplying rectifier is connected to the secondary winding coupled with the parallel connected transformers, thereby obtaining the same effect as when one transformer is used. The present invention achieves a low loss in the typical resonance type half bridge power supply even though two transformers are employed, and the switching power supply with a lowered height and thinned structure can be provided with the aid of the optimized arrangements of the resonance devices. The internal power loss can be lowered by using two parallel connected transformers as compared to a resonance type switching power supply which employs one transformer.


Lee S.,Cheongju University
Telematics and Informatics | Year: 2013

This study examines what factors lead to the adoption of the mobile e-book in South Korea. For this purpose, this research integrated the diffusion of innovation theory and technology acceptance model with the model of innovation resistance and applied this integrated model to the context of mobile e-book adoption. An online survey was administrated, and the data collected were analyzed with the structural equation model (SEM). Research results showed that individual innovativeness has a significant influence on perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use. It also revealed that both of perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use affect not only intention to use but also the innovation resistance. The innovation resistance has significant negative influence on the intention to use. Perceived risk of mobile e-books increases innovation resistance in a positive way. The implications of these results are discussed. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Obesity is closely associated with a state of chronic, low-grade inflammation characterized by abnormal cytokine production and activation of inflammatory signaling pathways in adipose tissue. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is chronically elevated in adipose tissues of obese rodents and humans. Increased levels of TNF-α are implicated in the induction of atherogenic adipokines, such as plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, adipose-tissue-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, and interleukin (IL)-6. Aucubin, an iridoid glycoside existing in medicinal plants, has been reported to show an anti-inflammatory activity by suppression of TNF-α production in murine macrophages. The present study is aimed to investigate the effects of aucubin on TNF-α-induced atherogenic changes of the adipokines in differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. Aucubin significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced secretion and mRNA synthesis of the atherogenic adipokines including PAI-1, MCP-1, and IL-6. Further investigation of the molecular mechanism revealed that pretreatment with aucubin suppressed extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, inhibitory kappa Bα (IκBα) degradation, and subsequent nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation. These findings suggest that aucubin may improve obesity-induced atherosclerosis by attenuating TNF-α-induced inflammatory responses. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Jun S.,Cheongju University
Communications in Computer and Information Science | Year: 2011

Many results of the developed technologies have applied for patents. Also, an issued patent has exclusive rights granted by a government. So, all companies in the world have competed with one another for their intellectual property rights using patent application. Technology forecasting is one of many approaches for improving the technological competitiveness. In this paper, we propose a forecasting model for technological trend using unsupervised learning. In this paper, we use association rule mining and self organizing map as unsupervised learning methods. To verify our improved performance, we make experiments using patent documents. Especially, we focus on image and video technology as the technology field. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.


Jun S.,Cheongju University
Communications in Computer and Information Science | Year: 2011

Patent documents are the results of researched and developed technologies. Patent is a protecting system of inventors' right for their technologies by a government. Also, patent is an important intellectual property of a company. R&D strategy has been depended on patent management. For efficient management of patent, we need to analyze patent data. In this paper, we propose a method for analyzing international patent classification (IPC) code as a patent analysis. We introduce association rules and maps for IPC code analysis. To verify our improved the performance, we will make experiments using searched patent documents of database technology. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.


The present invention provides a practical solar cell having a multiple quantum well structure and a method for manufacturing the same, and the heterostructure solar cell is capable of reducing the transmission loss of solar light and the short wavelength loss of solar light by inserting a multi-layer quantum well structure between p- and n-type semiconductors, thereby obtaining a high-efficiency solar cell which can overcome the limitations of theoretical conversion efficiency and reducing manufacturing costs.

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