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Robert A. Alberty, professor emeritus in the Department of Chemistry and former dean of MIT’s School of Science — whose seminal contributions to the thermodynamics and kinetics of biochemical reactions are still at the forefront of chemistry — passed away on Saturday, Jan. 18, at the age of 92. A member of the MIT faculty since 1967, Alberty led the School of Science from 1967 to 1982, when he returned to teaching and research in physical chemistry. He became professor emeritus in 1991. “Bob’s characterization of enzyme kinetics from 1955 to 1965 remains the model for investigations of enzymatic mechanism,” says chemistry department head Sylvia Ceyer, the J. C. Sheehan Professor of Chemistry. “His work is well-known for its utmost attention to detail, and despite being a demanding scientist, he was the quintessential gentleman — always kind and warm-hearted.” Alberty’s work placed the kinetic model by Leonor Michaelis and Maud Menten some 30 years earlier on a firm theoretical basis, Ceyer says, by describing the interplay between kinetics and equilibrium. He was also the first to recognize the complexity of the many species of adenosine 5’-triphosphate (ATP), she adds, and to develop a rigorous, but easily generalizable, thermodynamic treatment to relate them. Alberty was widely regarded by MIT colleagues as an accomplished educator at both the undergraduate and graduate level. Many of his students and postdocs went on to pursue outstanding research careers; he was particularly proud of those who became members of the National Academy of Sciences — a status he himself achieved in 1965. Alberty was the author or co-author of physical chemistry textbooks that are widely used to this day. Physical Chemistry (Wiley), a textbook he co-authored with Farrington Daniels in 1955, was his most esteemed and enduring work. Alberty’s refinements to the book spanned more than 50 years, during which time he and his co-authors — most recently Moungi Bawendi and the late Robert J. Silbey, both professors at MIT — updated the volume to meet current trends and standards. Physical Chemistry is still considered the benchmark textbook in the field, and is used in teaching 5.60 (Thermodynamics and Kinetics) in MIT’s Department of Chemistry. “I had the pleasure of watching Professor Alberty — Bob to everyone here — in action during the updating of the Physical Chemistry textbook,” says Bawendi, the Lester Wolfe Professor of Chemistry. “Bob was tireless and incredibly organized. He knew the contents of the book to the last detail, [and] rewrote or edited large parts of it, with a clear sense of what he thought should be reorganized to make the text up-to-date. It was an amazing learning experience and a humbling one to watch the two Bobs — Bob Alberty and Bob Silbey — rework the text, especially with Bob Alberty well into his eighties at the time.” “When I was hired at MIT in 1990, it was in anticipation of Bob’s retirement,” Bawendi adds. “But it never felt that Bob ever actually ‘retired,’ as he was still heavily involved for so many years writing theoretical works, textbooks, and active in leadership positions of chemical and scientific organizations. I was lucky to have had the chance to work with Bob.” Alberty’s work on Physical Chemistry led to invitations to participate in and chair national research committees concerned with laboratory safety standards and chemical disposal. A report he authored for the National Research Council in 1981, “Prudent Practices in the Chemical Laboratory,” sold more copies than any of that organization’s previous publications. Alberty also chaired the committee that wrote a second report, in 1983, “Prudent Practices for the Disposal of Chemicals in the Laboratory.” Alberty was no stranger to senior administrative roles at universities: In 1967, while dean of the Graduate School at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, he was invited to become dean of the School of Science at MIT, as well as a faculty member in the Department of Chemistry. His notable achievements as MIT’s dean of science included the development of a joint MIT-Harvard University MD-PhD program and the establishment of the Cancer Research Center, now the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research. He was also the first co-chairman of MIT’s exchange program with Wellesley College and chaired the Institute Committee on Environmental Health and Safety. As dean of science, Alberty “was always available to his colleagues, and always optimistic about finding funding for many endeavors to benefit chemistry and the Institute as a whole,” says Bob Field, the Robert T. Haslam and Bradley Dewey Professor of Chemistry. “He liked nothing better than to convey good news about tenure.” “I overlapped with the late stage of Bob Alberty’s career, after he returned to being ‘just’ a professor following a stint as dean of science,” says Keith Nelson, a professor of chemistry. “Long past official retirement and into emeritus status, Bob had fewer official responsibilities but just as much scientific curiosity, energy, and enthusiasm as ever. So he took advantage of the opportunity to work with few distractions to consolidate much of the last phase of his theoretical research and to write a unique textbook, Thermodynamics of Biochemical Reactions, published in 2005.” This topic is not covered in standard courses, Nelson adds, “largely because the theoretical framework and its applications were developed much more recently than the rest of thermodynamics, and significantly by Bob Alberty. The very next year, Bob published a supplementary text on applications of Mathematica software to problems in biochemical thermodynamics. … [He] was not content to inscribe his scientific achievements in textbook form, but also succeeded in bringing his discipline to life for a new generation of students and scientists.” Alberty spent 30 years as an advisor to the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation and was instrumental in developing many of its programs — including the Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program, which supports young chemistry professors who have demonstrated interest and ability in being outstanding teachers as they are considered for tenure. Born in Winfield, Kan., Alberty carried out his undergraduate studies at the University of Nebraska, receiving his BS in 1943, followed by an MS from the same university. In 1947, he received his PhD in chemistry from Wisconsin and immediately became an instructor at that institution. He moved up the ranks at Wisconsin, becoming a full professor in 1956. In 1962, he was appointed associate dean of letters and science before being appointed as the dean of the Graduate School in 1963. Alberty received professional awards and accolades including membership in the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the American Chemical Society. Alberty was predeceased by his wife of 66 years, Lillian; the couple met in high school, when he was president of the chemistry club and she was the club’s secretary. They both attended Wisconsin and married the day after their graduation. Alberty is survived by his three children, Nancy Lou Zant, of Fairfield, Mont.; Steven C. Alberty, of Eugene, Ore.; and Catherine Alberty Baxter, of Roseville, Minn.; by nine grandchildren; and by six great-grandchildren. Services will take place at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Jan. 25, at University Lutheran Church, 66 Winthrop St., Cambridge.


News Article | February 20, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

This report studies Laboratory Glassware in Global market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with capacity, production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with production, consumption, revenue, market share and growth rate of Laboratory Glassware in these regions, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like North America Europe China Japan Southeast Asia India Split by product type, with production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into Container Measurer Filter Others Split by application, this report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of Laboratory Glassware in each application, can be divided into Chemical Laboratory Bio-pharmaceutical Laboratory Food Testing Laboratory Others Global Laboratory Glassware Market Research Report 2017 1 Laboratory Glassware Market Overview 1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Laboratory Glassware 1.2 Laboratory Glassware Segment by Type 1.2.1 Global Production Market Share of Laboratory Glassware by Type in 2015 1.2.2 Container 1.2.3 Measurer 1.2.4 Filter 1.2.5 Others 1.3 Laboratory Glassware Segment by Application 1.3.1 Laboratory Glassware Consumption Market Share by Application in 2015 1.3.2 Chemical Laboratory 1.3.3 Bio-pharmaceutical Laboratory 1.3.4 Food Testing Laboratory 1.3.5 Others 1.4 Laboratory Glassware Market by Region 1.4.1 North America Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.2 Europe Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.3 China Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.4 Japan Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.5 Southeast Asia Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.6 India Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.5 Global Market Size (Value) of Laboratory Glassware (2012-2022) 7 Global Laboratory Glassware Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis 7.1 Kimble Chase 7.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.1.2 Laboratory Glassware Product Type, Application and Specification 7.1.2.1 Product A 7.1.2.2 Product B 7.1.3 Kimble Chase Laboratory Glassware Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.2 DURAN Group 7.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.2.2 Laboratory Glassware Product Type, Application and Specification 7.2.2.1 Product A 7.2.2.2 Product B 7.2.3 DURAN Group Laboratory Glassware Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.3 Bellco Glass 7.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.3.2 Laboratory Glassware Product Type, Application and Specification 7.3.2.1 Product A 7.3.2.2 Product B 7.3.3 Bellco Glass Laboratory Glassware Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.4 Corning 7.4.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.4.2 Laboratory Glassware Product Type, Application and Specification 7.4.2.1 Product A 7.4.2.2 Product B 7.4.3 Corning Laboratory Glassware Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.4.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.5 Quark Enterprises 7.5.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.5.2 Laboratory Glassware Product Type, Application and Specification 7.5.2.1 Product A 7.5.2.2 Product B 7.5.3 Quark Enterprises Laboratory Glassware Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.5.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.6 Wilmad-LabGlass (SP Industries 7.6.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.6.2 Laboratory Glassware Product Type, Application and Specification 7.6.2.1 Product A 7.6.2.2 Product B 7.6.3 Wilmad-LabGlass (SP Industries Laboratory Glassware Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.6.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.7 Hamilton Laboratory Glass 7.7.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.7.2 Laboratory Glassware Product Type, Application and Specification 7.7.2.1 Product A 7.7.2.2 Product B 7.7.3 Hamilton Laboratory Glass Laboratory Glassware Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.7.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.8 Kavalierglass 7.8.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.8.2 Laboratory Glassware Product Type, Application and Specification 7.8.2.1 Product A 7.8.2.2 Product B 7.8.3 Kavalierglass Laboratory Glassware Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.8.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.9 Glacier Lab 7.9.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.9.2 Laboratory Glassware Product Type, Application and Specification 7.9.2.1 Product A 7.9.2.2 Product B 7.9.3 Glacier Lab Laboratory Glassware Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.9.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.10 Eagle Laboratory Glass Company 7.10.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors 7.10.2 Laboratory Glassware Product Type, Application and Specification 7.10.2.1 Product A 7.10.2.2 Product B 7.10.3 Eagle Laboratory Glass Company Laboratory Glassware Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.10.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.11 BOROSIL 7.12 Jencons Glass Industries 7.13 Sibata Scientific Technology 7.14 Promax 7.15 Glassco Group 7.16 Cosmo Laboratory Equipment 7.17 Hario 7.18 Pioneer Scientific Instrument 7.19 SCAM Lab Glass 7.20 Sichuan Shubo 7.21 Huaou Industry 7.22 North Glass 7.23 Tianbao Glass Instrument 7.24 Shanghai Heqi Glassware 7.25 Jianghai Instrument Fitting 7.26 Kahotest Citotest Labware Manufacturing 7.27 Haimen Shengbang Laboratory Equipment 7.28 Yadong Glassware For more information, please visit https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/956427-global-laboratory-glassware-market-research-report-2017


News Article | November 6, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

When Sidhant Pai visited a local rubbish dump in his home city of Pune, India, he was struck by the size and intensity of the operation. Large black crows swooping overhead, roaming pigs, overwhelming odours and groups of waste pickers collecting plastic bottles in large white sacks. There are an estimated 15 million people globally who currently make their living from waste picking and many earn less than a dollar a day. A key problem, says environmental engineer Pai, is that workers only capture a tiny proportion of the value of the waste they collect, separate and transport to scrap dealers. Together with his parents, Suchismita and Jayant Pai, he founded social enterprise Protoprint in 2012, one of a number of organisations trying to address the twin issues of poor conditions for waste pickers and plastic waste pollution. More than 300m tonnes of plastic are produced globally every year, with much ending up in the ocean (one refuse truck’s worth every minute), in landfill, or on city streets. “Our focus was on looking into different ways to add value to the waste, we were agnostic about the specific product,” Pai says. After experimenting with making a few different products, Protoprint settled on making the plastic filament – the “ink” –­ for 3D printers. “It added a tremendous amount of value to the waste plastic while still being relatively simple to manufacture at the dump.” Protoprint partnered with SWaCH, a Pune-based cooperative wholly owned by waste pickers. Together they have set up a low-cost filament production facility at a local rubbish dump in Pune operated by SWaCH waste pickers to convert plastic waste – specifically high-density polyethylene (HPDE) mostly used for plastic bottles – into 3D printing filament to eventually be sold to Indian or international 3D printing companies. Protoprint buys filament from SwaCH for 300 rupees (£3.50) per kg – if waste pickers sold the plastic waste directly to scrap merchants the pickers would receive around 19 rupees (23p) per kg, says Pai. “After factoring in the costs of production and the various other expenses, there is still a six to eight times multiplier per kilogram of filament,” he says. The market for filament, the majority of which is made from virgin plastic, is growing rapidly. A report by a leading markets analyst predicted the 3D printing materials market would grow by nearly 266% over the next five years, to be worth £1.07bn by 2021. However, most of it is expensive because of production and export costs, says William Hoyle, CEO of TechforTrade. The British charity is working to promote and standardise an ethical way for filament to be made from the plastic collected by waste collectors. Ethical filament will be cheaper to buy than commercial filament, Hoyle says, because waste plastic is free resource and production costs are lower in developing countries. “The ethical filament standard is an open standard,” says Hoyle. “We see the certification process happening in two ways. First, the social, environmental and economic assessment would be done by the waste collection organisation ... Second, the technical quality standard will be assessed by an independent third party and we are in discussion with a specialist assessor that will undertake this task.” Amsterdam-based ReFlow, a social enterprise based in the Netherlands, works with one of TechforTrade’s printing partners in Tanzania, STICLab, on a pilot project in Dar es Salaam. Co-founder Jasper Middendorp compares the potential of 3D printing to the development of mobile banking or solar in Africa, both of which flourished because infrastructure was broken. “Tanzania is highly import dependent and has very little of its own production infrastructure,” he says, and 3D printing decentralises production without a huge capital expense or a great deal of specialised knowledge. This, he says, helps “make countries more self-sufficient instead of importing products from abroad that may not be suited to the local context”. Previously supported by seed funding and the founders’ own money, ReFlow has just closed off a Kickstarter campaign, raising €26,000 (£23,000) and plans to launch the product in Amsterdam in February 2017. However, it is still working on quality control. “We haven’t produced market quality filament yet,” says Middendorp, “but we are hoping to do so within a month.” The quality of the filament made from recycled waste plastic is a challenge for the whole 3D printing industry, says Pai. Protoprint’s pilot unit is currently making filament but is not yet ready to sell to market as there are problems with warping. The company is working with a team of senior polymer scientists from the National Chemical Laboratory to develop an additive for the filament to prevent the warping issue, funded by a government grant. Protoprint says it currently has 4,000kg of pre-orders, mostly from small- and medium-sized distributors based in the US, UK, Germany and India looking to sample and test the filament. “We have not yet started commercial operations and are working on improving our filament quality before we do so,” says Pai. Quality is not necessarily an insurmountable issue, says Thomas Birtchnell, a lecturer at the University of Wollongong and author of 3D Printing for Development in the Global South. Much of the recycled filament is destined for “the open source market for low-end products,” he says, “they may not look glamorous but they are still functional products that can be used in development contexts”. The greatest potential 3D printing offers the developing world is not for the products made, but for “putting the means of production into the hands of the local people”, says Jeremy Faludi, a sustainable design strategy consultant and teacher at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design. The market for ethical filament is a small one, he adds, but “if the quality can match virgin filament at a similar price point, then it can be a large market. As with all things in sustainability, customers like the story, they’re just not willing to pay more for it.”


Kumar A.R.,Chemical Laboratory | Riyazuddin P.,University of Madras
Environmental Monitoring and Assessment | Year: 2010

Chromium speciation in groundwater of a tannery polluted area was investigated for the distribution of chromium species and the influence of redox couples such as Fe(III)/Fe(II) and Mn(IV)/Mn(II). Speciation analysis was carried out by ammonium pyrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC)-methylisobutylketone (MIBK) procedure. The groundwater samples were analyzed for Cr(III), Cr(VI), and Cr(III)-organic complexes. The APDC could not extract the Cr(III)-organic complexes, but HNO3 digestion of the groundwater samples released the Cr(III)-organic complexes. The groundwater of the area is relatively oxidizing with redox potential (Eh) and dissolved oxygen (DO) ranged between 65 and 299 mV and 0.25 and 4.65 mg L-1, respectively. The Fe(II) reduction of Cr(VI) was observed in some wells, but several wells that had Fe(II)/Cr(VI) concentrations more than the stoichiometric ratio (3:1) of the reduction reaction also had appreciable concentration of Cr(VI). This could partly be due to the oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III) by DO. It appears that the occurrence of Mn more than the Fe(II) concentration was also responsible for the presence of Cr(VI). Other reasons could be the Fe(II) complexation by organic ligands and the loss of reducing capacity of Fe(II) due to aquifer materials, but could not be established in this study. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Kumar A.R.,Chemical Laboratory | Riyazuddin P.,University of Madras
Environmental Monitoring and Assessment | Year: 2011

Chromium species (Cr(III), Cr(VI), and Cr(III)-organic) in groundwater of a tannery contaminated area were monitored during pre- and post-monsoon seasons for a period of 3 years (May 2004 to January 2007). The objectives of the study were (1) to investigate the temporal variation of chromium species and other matrix constituents and (2) to study the redox processes associated with the temporal variation of chromium species. Samples were collected from 15 dug wells and analyzed for chromium species and other constituents. The results showed that the groundwater was relatively more oxidizing during post-monsoon periods than the pre-monsoon periods. Except one sample, the concentration of chromium species were found in the order of Cr(VI)>Cr(III)>Cr(III)-organic complexes during all the pre- and post-monsoon periods. In most of the wells, the concentrations of Cr(III), Cr(VI), and Cr(III)-organic decreased during post-monsoon periods compared to their pre-monsoon concentrations. However, the Cr(VI)/CrTotal ratio still increased and the Cr(III)/Cr Total ratio decreased during post-monsoon periods in most of the samples. The possible mechanisms for the temporal variation of chromium species were (1) Fe(II) reduction of Cr(VI) vs oxidation of Fe(II) by dissolved oxygen and (2) oxidation of Cr(III) by Mn(IV). © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Ramesh Kumar A.,Chemical Laboratory | Riyazuddin P.,University of Madras
Journal of Hydrology | Year: 2012

The seasonal variation of redox potential (Eh) and redox species such as As(V)/As(III), Cr(VI)/Cr(III), Fe(III)/Fe(II), NO3-/NO2-, and Se(VI)/Se(IV) were studied in a shallow groundwater for a period of three years (May, 2004-January, 2007). The study area was Chrompet area of Chennai city, India. Groundwater samples from 65 wells were monitored for pH, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen (DO), and major ions during pre-(May) and post-monsoon (January) seasons. The objective of the study was to gain insight into the temporal variation of the redox species due to groundwater recharge and to identify the redox reactions controlling the measured Eh of the groundwater. The study revealed that the shallow groundwater was " oxic" with DO ranging between 0.25 and 5.00mgL -1, and between 0.38 and 5.05mgL -1 during pre-(May, 2004) and post-monsoon (January, 2005) seasons, respectively. The measured Eh (with respect to standard hydrogen electrode, SHE) ranged between 65 and 322mV, and between 110 and 330mV during pre- and post-monsoon seasons, respectively. During post-monsoon seasons, DO and Eh increased in most of the wells due to groundwater recharge. The calculated Eh using the redox couples As(V)/As(III), NO3-/NO2-, O 2/H 2O and Se(VI)/Se(IV) neither agreed among themselves nor with the measured Eh during all the seasons. It shows that in the shallow groundwater, the various redox couples are in disequilibrium among themselves and with the Pt electrode. However, 41% (n=122) of the Eh values calculated from Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple agreed with the measured Eh within ±30mV, the uncertainty of Pt-electrode measurement. The post-monsoon seasons showed higher values of As(V)/As(III) and Se(VI)/Se(IV) compared to the pre-monsoon seasons, whereas Fe(III)/Fe(II) behaved in the opposite manner. This pattern of variation is consistent with the increased oxidizing nature, as shown by the higher DO and Eh values observed during post-monsoon seasons. The results showed that the Fe(III)/Fe(II) is the dominant redox couple to equilibrate with Pt electrode. However, the measured Eh can only be used in a semi-qualitative way and can be interpreted with other redox indicating parameters. The measured Eh though represent 'mixed potential', is a useful indicator for characterizing the speciation and temporal variation of redox sensitive species. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Kumar A.R.,Chemical Laboratory | Riyazuddin P.,University of Madras
Journal of Hazardous Materials | Year: 2011

Speciation of selenium in groundwater is essential from the viewpoint of toxicity to organisms and biogeochemical cycling. Selenium speciation in groundwater is controlled by aquifer redox conditions, microbial transformations, dissolved oxygen (DO) and other redox couples. A suburban area of Chennai city in India, where improper waste disposal measures have been practiced is selected for this study. Se(IV), Se(VI) and other hydrochemical parameters were monitored in shallow ground water during pre- and post-monsoon seasons for a period of three years. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of groundwater recharge on selenium speciation. The concentration of Se(IV), and Se(VI) ranged between 0.15-0.43μgL-1 and 0.16-4.73μgL-1, respectively. During post-monsoon period the concentration of Se(IV), and Se(VI) ranged between 0.15-1.25μgL-1 and 0.58-10.37μgL-1, respectively. Se(VI) was the dominant species of selenium during the pre- and post-monsoon periods. During the post-monsoon periods, leaching of selenium from soil was more effective due to the increased oxidizing nature of the groundwater as indicated by the DO and redox potential (Eh) measurements. This finding has important implications on the behavior of selenium in groundwater, and also on the health of people consuming groundwater from seleniferous areas. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.


This report studies Laboratory Chemical Reagents in Global market, especially in North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, South America, Middle East and Africa, focuses on the top 5 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Players in each region, with sales, price, revenue and market share for top 5 manufacturer, covering Merck Thermo TCI American Element Sinopharm Xilongchemical ABCR BOC Sciences Wako-chem Kanto Scientific OEM Glentham Life Sciences JHD SRL Chemical Applichem JUNSEI Euroasia Trans Continental Aladdin Jkchemical Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with sales, revenue, market share of top 5 players in these regions, from 2012 to 2017 (forecast), like North America (United States, Canada and Mexico) Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Southeast Asia, India and Korea) Europe (Germany, UK, France, Italy and Russia etc. South America (Brazil, Chile, Peru and Argentina) Middle East and Africa (Egypt, South Africa, Saudi Arabia) Split by Product Types, with sales, revenue, price, market share of each type, can be divided into Solvents Acids Standards Dyes Solutions Split by applications, this report focuses on sales, market share and growth rate of Laboratory Chemical Reagents in each application, can be divided into Government Academic Industry Pharma Environmental institutions 1 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Market Overview 1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Laboratory Chemical Reagents 1.2 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Segment by Types 1.2.1 Global Sales Market Share of Laboratory Chemical Reagents by Types in 2015 1.2.2 Solvents 1.2.3 Acids 1.2.4 Standards 1.2.5 Dyes 1.2.6 Solutions 1.3 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Segment by Applications 1.3.1 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Consumption Market Share by Applications in 2015 1.3.2 Government 1.3.3 Academic 1.3.4 Industry 1.3.5 Pharma 1.3.6 Environmental institutions 1.4 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Market by Regions 1.4.1 North America Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.2 Asia-Pacific Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.3 Europe Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.4 South America Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.5 Middle East and Africa Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.5 Global Market Size (Value) of Laboratory Chemical Reagents (2012-2022) 2 Global Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue (value) and Market Share by Players 2.1 Global Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share in 2015 and 2016 by Players 2.2 Global Laboratory Chemical Reagents Revenue and Market Share by Players in 2015 and 2016 2.3 Global Laboratory Chemical Reagents Average Price by Players in 2015 and 2016 2.4 Global Laboratory Chemical Reagents Manufacturing Base Distribution, Sales Area, Product Types by Players 2.5 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Market Competitive Situation and Trends 2.5.1 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Market Concentration Rate 2.5.2 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Market Share of Top 3 and Top 5 Players 2.5.3 Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion 3 Global Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue (Value) by Regions, Type and Application (2012-2017) 3.1 Global Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue and Market Share by Regions (2012-2017) 3.1.1 Global Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share by Regions (2012-2017) 3.1.2 Global Laboratory Chemical Reagents Revenue and Market Share by Regions (2012-2017) 3.2 Global Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Market Share and Price by Type (2012-2017) 3.2.1 Global Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share by Type (2012-2017) 3.2.2 Global Laboratory Chemical Reagents Revenue and Market Share by Type (2012-2017) 3.2.3 Global Laboratory Chemical Reagents Price by Type (2012-2017) 3.3 Global Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share by Application (2012-2017) 3.4 Global Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 4 North America Top 5 Players Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue and Price 4.1 North America Top 5 Players Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue and Market Share in 2015 and 2016 4.1.1 North America Top 5 Players Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share in 2015 and 2016 4.1.2 North America Top 5 Players Laboratory Chemical Reagents Revenue and Market Share in 2015 and 2016 4.2 North America Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Market Share and Price by Type (2012-2017) 4.2.1 North America Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share by Type (2012-2017) 4.2.2 North America Laboratory Chemical Reagents Revenue and Market Share by Type (2012-2017) 4.2.3 North America Laboratory Chemical Reagents Price by Type (2012-2017) 4.3 North America Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share by Application (2012-2017) 4.4 North America Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share by Country (US, Canada and Mexico) (2012-2017) 4.5 North America Laboratory Chemical Reagents Import & Export (2012-2017) 5 Europe Top 5 Players Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue and Price 5.1 Europe Top 5 Players Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue and Market Share in 2015 and 2016 5.1.1 Europe Top 5 Players Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share in 2015 and 2016 5.1.2 Europe Top 5 Players Laboratory Chemical Reagents Revenue and Market Share in 2015 and 2016 5.2 Europe Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Market Share and Price by Type (2012-2017) 5.2.1 Europe Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share by Type (2012-2017) 5.2.2 Europe Laboratory Chemical Reagents Revenue and Market Share by Type (2012-2017) 5.2.3 Europe Laboratory Chemical Reagents Price by Type (2012-2017) 5.3 Europe Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share by Application (2012-2017) 5.4 Europe Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share by Country (Germany, UK, France, Italy and Russia) (2012-2017) 5.5 Europe Laboratory Chemical Reagents Import & Export (2012-2017) 6 Asia-Pacific Top 5 Players Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue and Price 6.1 Asia-Pacific Top 5 Players Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue and Market Share in 2015 and 2016 6.1.1 Asia-Pacific Top 5 Players Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share in 2015 and 2016 6.1.2 Asia-Pacific Top 5 Players Laboratory Chemical Reagents Revenue and Market Share in 2015 and 2016 6.2 Asia-Pacific Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Market Share and Price by Type (2012-2017) 6.2.1 Asia-Pacific Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share by Type (2012-2017) 6.2.2 Asia-Pacific Laboratory Chemical Reagents Revenue and Market Share by Type (2012-2017) 6.2.3 Asia-Pacific Laboratory Chemical Reagents Price by Type (2012-2017) 6.3 Asia-Pacific Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share by Application (2012-2017) 6.4 Asia-Pacific Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share by Country (China, Japan, Southeast Asia, India and Korea) (2012-2017) 6.5 Asia-Pacific Laboratory Chemical Reagents Import & Export (2012-2017) 7 South America Top 5 Players Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue and Price 7.1 South America Top 5 Players Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue and Market Share in 2015 and 2016 7.1.1 South America Top 5 Players Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share in 2015 and 2016 7.1.2 South America Top 5 Players Laboratory Chemical Reagents Revenue and Market Share in 2015 and 2016 7.2 South America Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Market Share and Price by Type (2012-2017) 7.2.1 South America Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share by Type (2012-2017) 7.2.2 South America Laboratory Chemical Reagents Revenue and Market Share by Type (2012-2017) 7.2.3 South America Laboratory Chemical Reagents Price by Type (2012-2017) 7.3 South America Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share by Application (2012-2017) 7.4 South America Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share by Country (Brazil, Argentina, Chile and Peru) (2012-2017) 7.5 South America Laboratory Chemical Reagents Import & Export (2012-2017) 8 Middle East & Africa Top 5 Players Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue and Price 8.1 Middle East & Africa Top 5 Players Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue and Market Share in 2015 and 2016 8.1.1 Middle East & Africa Top 5 Players Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share in 2015 and 2016 8.1.2 Middle East & Africa Top 5 Players Laboratory Chemical Reagents Revenue and Market Share in 2015 and 2016 8.2 Middle East & Africa Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Market Share and Price by Type (2012-2017) 8.2.1 Middle East & Africa Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share by Type (2012-2017) 8.2.2 Middle East & Africa Laboratory Chemical Reagents Revenue and Market Share by Type (2012-2017) 8.2.3 Middle East & Africa Laboratory Chemical Reagents Price by Type (2012-2017) 8.3 Middle East & Africa Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share by Application (2012-2017) 8.4 Middle East & Africa Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales and Market Share by Country (Egypt, Saudi Arabia, South Africa and Iran) (2012-2017) 8.5 Middle East & Africa Laboratory Chemical Reagents Import & Export (2012-2017) 9 Global Laboratory Chemical Reagents Players Profiles/Analysis 9.1 Merck 9.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 9.1.2 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Product Types, Application and Specification 9.1.2.1 Type 1 9.1.2.2 Type 2 9.1.3 Merck Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.2 Thermo 9.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 9.2.2 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Product Types, Application and Specification 9.2.2.1 Type 1 9.2.2.2 Type 2 9.2.3 Thermo Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.3 TCI 9.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 9.3.2 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Product Types, Application and Specification 9.3.2.1 Type 1 9.3.2.2 Type 2 9.3.3 TCI Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.4 American Element 9.4.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 9.4.2 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Product Types, Application and Specification 9.4.2.1 Type 1 9.4.2.2 Type 2 9.4.3 American Element Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.4.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.5 Sinopharm 9.5.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 9.5.2 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Product Types, Application and Specification 9.5.2.1 Type 1 9.5.2.2 Type 2 9.5.3 Sinopharm Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.5.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.6 Xilongchemical 9.6.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 9.6.2 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Product Types, Application and Specification 9.6.2.1 Type 1 9.6.2.2 Type 2 9.6.3 Xilongchemical Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.6.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.7 ABCR 9.7.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 9.7.2 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Product Types, Application and Specification 9.7.2.1 Type 1 9.7.2.2 Type 2 9.7.3 ABCR Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.7.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.8 BOC Sciences 9.8.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 9.8.2 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Product Types, Application and Specification 9.8.2.1 Type 1 9.8.2.2 Type 2 9.8.3 BOC Sciences Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.8.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.9 Wako-chem 9.9.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 9.9.2 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Product Types, Application and Specification 9.9.2.1 Type 1 9.9.2.2 Type 2 9.9.3 Wako-chem Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.9.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.10 Kanto 9.10.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 9.10.2 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Product Types, Application and Specification 9.10.2.1 Type 1 9.10.2.2 Type 2 9.10.3 Kanto Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.10.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.11 Scientific OEM 9.11.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 9.11.2 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Product Types, Application and Specification 9.11.2.1 Type 1 9.11.2.2 Type 2 9.11.3 Scientific OEM Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.11.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.12 Glentham Life Sciences 9.12.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 9.12.2 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Product Types, Application and Specification 9.12.2.1 Type 1 9.12.2.2 Type 2 9.12.3 Glentham Life Sciences Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.12.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.13 JHD 9.13.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 9.13.2 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Product Types, Application and Specification 9.13.2.1 Type 1 9.13.2.2 Type 2 9.13.3 JHD Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.13.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.14 SRL Chemical 9.14.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 9.14.2 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Product Types, Application and Specification 9.14.2.1 Type 1 9.14.2.2 Type 2 9.14.3 SRL Chemical Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.14.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.15 Applichem 9.15.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 9.15.2 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Product Types, Application and Specification 9.15.2.1 Type 1 9.15.2.2 Type 2 9.15.3 Applichem Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.15.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.16 JUNSEI 9.16.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 9.16.2 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Product Types, Application and Specification 9.16.2.1 Type 1 9.16.2.2 Type 2 9.16.3 JUNSEI Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.16.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.17 Euroasia Trans Continental 9.17.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 9.17.2 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Product Types, Application and Specification 9.17.2.1 Type 1 9.17.2.2 Type 2 9.17.3 Euroasia Trans Continental Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.17.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.18 Aladdin 9.18.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 9.18.2 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Product Types, Application and Specification 9.18.2.1 Type 1 9.18.2.2 Type 2 9.18.3 Aladdin Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.18.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.19 Jkchemical 9.19.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 9.19.2 Laboratory Chemical Reagents Product Types, Application and Specification 9.19.2.1 Type 1 9.19.2.2 Type 2 9.19.3 Jkchemical Laboratory Chemical Reagents Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.19.4 Main Business/Business Overview Get It Now @ 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Hedegaard R.V.,Technical University of Denmark | Hedegaard R.V.,Copenhagen University | Rokkjaer I.,Chemical Laboratory | Sloth J.J.,Technical University of Denmark
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry | Year: 2013

The content of total and inorganic arsenic was determined in 16 dietary supplements based on herbs, other botanicals and algae purchased on the Danish market. The dietary supplements originated from various regions, including Asia, Europe and USA. The contents of total and inorganic arsenic was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and anion exchange HPLC-ICP-MS, respectively, were in the range of 0.58 to 5.0 mgkg-1 and 0.03 to 3.2 mgkg-1, respectively, with a ratio between inorganic arsenic and total arsenic ranging between 5 and 100 %. Consumption of the recommended dose of the individual dietary supplement would lead to an exposure to inorganic arsenic within the range of 0.07 to 13 μgday-1. Such exposure from dietary supplements would in worst case constitute 62.4 % of the range of benchmark dose lower confidence limit values (BMDL01 at 0.3 to 8 μg kg bw-1 kg-1 day-1) put down by European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) in 2009, for cancers of the lung, skin and bladder, as well as skin lesions. Hence, the results demonstrate that consumption of certain dietary supplements could contribute significantly to the dietary exposure to inorganic arsenic at levels close to the toxicological limits established by EFSA. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013.


Qaiser A.A.,University of Auckland | Price J.,Chemical Laboratory
Mechanics of Time-Dependent Materials | Year: 2011

Long-term property estimation is required for the long-term load bearing applications of thermoplastics. In the present work, short-term creep behavior of commercial grade polycarbonate was evaluated using an in-house manufactured testing rig at various creep stress levels keeping the testing temperature constant. Creep curves were shifted with respect to the time scale and a Master curve was obtained using stress-time superposition principle. To assess the effects of physical aging on the creep behavior, various specimens with different aging histories were tested. It was observed that aging had an insignificant effect on the creep behavior of polycarbonate under the employed conditioning and testing conditions. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, B. V.

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