Chemical Genomics Center

Dortmund, Germany

Chemical Genomics Center

Dortmund, Germany

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News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) often respond to standard chemotherapy, only to develop drug resistance later, and with fatal consequences. But what if doctors could identify those at greatest risk of relapse and provide a therapy to overcome or avoid it? Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center believe they have an answer: a 35-gene signature that identifies tumor cells most likely to develop resistance to treatment. The study, published today in Cell Reports, points to a new pharmacologic approach to target chemo-resistant lung cancer and even prevent development of such resistance in the first place. "Cancer relapse after chemotherapy poses a major obstacle to treating lung cancer, and resistance to chemotherapy is a big cause of that treatment failure," said study co-author Dr. John Minna, a Professor and Director of in the Hamon Center for Therapeutic Oncology Research at UT Southwestern. "These findings provide new insights into why resistance develops and how to overcome it." Dr. Minna, with additional appointments in Pharmacology and Internal Medicine, also holds the Sarah M. and Charles E. Seay Distinguished Chair in Cancer Research and the Max L. Thomas Distinguished Chair in Molecular Pulmonary Oncology. Investigators studied mouse and cellular models of NSCLC, a type of lung cancer that the American Cancer Society estimates accounts for 85 percent of all lung cancer cases in the United States. "Previous studies have shown that up to 70 percent of those cancers develop resistance to standard therapy, such as the platinum-taxane two-drug combo that is often given," said study senior author Dr. Elisabeth D. Martinez, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and in the Hamon Center. Both she and Dr. Minna are also members of UTSW's Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center. Using long-term on/off drug cycles, lead author and former postdoctoral researcher Dr. Maithili Dalvi developed a series of cellular models of progressive tumor resistance to standard chemotherapy that ranged from very sensitive to highly insensitive. Next, the researchers identified genes commonly altered during the development of resistance across multiple cell line and mouse models and identified a 35-gene signature that indicated a higher genetic likelihood of chemotherapy resistance. "It's like a fingerprint for resistance," Dr. Martinez said, adding that it was predictive in both cells and mouse models. Next they compared this resistance biomarker using genetic profiles from human tumors in their National Cancer Institute (NCI) lung cancer Specialized Programs of Research Excellence (SPORE) database at UT MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. The database contained information on patient outcomes and those who had been treated with the two-drug chemotherapy. The genetic fingerprint for resistance correlated with cancer relapse in NSCLC patients in the database, she said. Researchers discovered that as cancer cells developed greater resistance to chemotherapy, they progressively made higher amounts of enzymes called JumonjiC lysine demethylases. Dr. Martinez said these enzymes facilitate resistance by changing the expression of - or turning on and off - genes. "Cancer cells use these enzymes to change, or reprogram, gene expression in order to survive the toxic stress of the chemotherapy. By changing the expression of genes, the tumor cells can adapt and survive the toxins," she said. Investigators then tested two potential drugs, both JumonjiC inhibitors. One of them, JIB-04, was found by UT Southwestern researchers in the Martinez lab during a small-molecule screen conducted at the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences' Chemical Genomics Center in Bethesda, Maryland. "I believe this is the first report of NSCLC tumors taking advantage of multiple JumonjiC enzymes to reprogram gene expression in order to survive chemotoxic stress. In addition, and this is the most fascinating part: Dr. Dalvi found that greater chemotherapy resistance defines a new susceptibility to the JumonjiC inhibitors," she said. "The cancer cells develop a new Achilles' heel that we can hit." Because the chemo-resistant cancer cells are dependent on JumonjiC enzymes for survival, inhibiting those enzymes returns cancer cells to mortality and vulnerability to cell death, she explained. "We think these JumonjiC inhibitors have the potential to be used either to treat tumors once they become resistant to standard therapies, or to prevent resistance altogether," she said. "In our experiments these inhibitors appear to be much more potent in killing cancer cells than normal cells." Later, researchers tested whether the Jumonji inhibitors JIB-04 or GSK-J4 prevented chemotherapy resistance. This strategy succeeded in cell cultures and partially prevented resistance in animal models, Dr. Martinez said.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) often respond to standard chemotherapy, only to develop drug resistance later, and with fatal consequences. But what if doctors could identify those at greatest risk of relapse and provide a therapy to overcome or avoid it? Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center believe they have an answer: a 35-gene signature that identifies tumor cells most likely to develop resistance to treatment. The study, published in Cell Reports, points to a new pharmacologic approach to target chemo-resistant lung cancer and even prevent development of such resistance in the first place. "Cancer relapse after chemotherapy poses a major obstacle to treating lung cancer, and resistance to chemotherapy is a big cause of that treatment failure," said study co-author Dr. John Minna, a Professor and Director of in the Hamon Center for Therapeutic Oncology Research at UT Southwestern. "These findings provide new insights into why resistance develops and how to overcome it." Dr. Minna, with additional appointments in Pharmacology and Internal Medicine, also holds the Sarah M. and Charles E. Seay Distinguished Chair in Cancer Research and the Max L. Thomas Distinguished Chair in Molecular Pulmonary Oncology. Investigators studied mouse and cellular models of NSCLC, a type of lung cancer that the American Cancer Society estimates accounts for 85 percent of all lung cancer cases in the United States. "Previous studies have shown that up to 70 percent of those cancers develop resistance to standard therapy, such as the platinum-taxane two-drug combo that is often given," said study senior author Dr. Elisabeth D. Martinez, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and in the Hamon Center. Both she and Dr. Minna are also members of UTSW's Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center. Using long-term on/off drug cycles, lead author and former postdoctoral researcher Dr. Maithili Dalvi developed a series of cellular models of progressive tumor resistance to standard chemotherapy that ranged from very sensitive to highly insensitive. Next, the researchers identified genes commonly altered during the development of resistance across multiple cell line and mouse models and identified a 35-gene signature that indicated a higher genetic likelihood of chemotherapy resistance. "It's like a fingerprint for resistance," Dr. Martinez said, adding that it was predictive in both cells and mouse models. Next they compared this resistance biomarker using genetic profiles from human tumors in their National Cancer Institute (NCI) lung cancer Specialized Programs of Research Excellence (SPORE) database at UT MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. The database contained information on patient outcomes and those who had been treated with the two-drug chemotherapy. The genetic fingerprint for resistance correlated with cancer relapse in NSCLC patients in the database, she said. Researchers discovered that as cancer cells developed greater resistance to chemotherapy, they progressively made higher amounts of enzymes called JumonjiC lysine demethylases. Dr. Martinez said these enzymes facilitate resistance by changing the expression of -- or turning on and off -- genes. "Cancer cells use these enzymes to change, or reprogram, gene expression in order to survive the toxic stress of the chemotherapy. By changing the expression of genes, the tumor cells can adapt and survive the toxins," she said. Investigators then tested two potential drugs, both JumonjiC inhibitors. One of them, JIB-04, was found by UT Southwestern researchers in the Martinez lab during a small-molecule screen conducted at the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences' Chemical Genomics Center in Bethesda, Maryland. "I believe this is the first report of NSCLC tumors taking advantage of multiple JumonjiC enzymes to reprogram gene expression in order to survive chemotoxic stress. In addition, and this is the most fascinating part: Dr. Dalvi found that greater chemotherapy resistance defines a new susceptibility to the JumonjiC inhibitors," she said. "The cancer cells develop a new Achilles' heel that we can hit." Because the chemo-resistant cancer cells are dependent on JumonjiC enzymes for survival, inhibiting those enzymes returns cancer cells to mortality and vulnerability to cell death, she explained. "We think these JumonjiC inhibitors have the potential to be used either to treat tumors once they become resistant to standard therapies, or to prevent resistance altogether," she said. "In our experiments these inhibitors appear to be much more potent in killing cancer cells than normal cells." Later, researchers tested whether the Jumonji inhibitors JIB-04 or GSK-J4 prevented chemotherapy resistance. This strategy succeeded in cell cultures and partially prevented resistance in animal models, Dr. Martinez said.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

DALLAS - May 23, 2017 - Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) often respond to standard chemotherapy, only to develop drug resistance later, and with fatal consequences. But what if doctors could identify those at greatest risk of relapse and provide a therapy to overcome or avoid it? Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center believe they have an answer: a 35-gene signature that identifies tumor cells most likely to develop resistance to treatment. The study, published today in Cell Reports, points to a new pharmacologic approach to target chemo-resistant lung cancer and even prevent development of such resistance in the first place. "Cancer relapse after chemotherapy poses a major obstacle to treating lung cancer, and resistance to chemotherapy is a big cause of that treatment failure," said study co-author Dr. John Minna, a Professor and Director of in the Hamon Center for Therapeutic Oncology Research at UT Southwestern. "These findings provide new insights into why resistance develops and how to overcome it." Dr. Minna, with additional appointments in Pharmacology and Internal Medicine, also holds the Sarah M. and Charles E. Seay Distinguished Chair in Cancer Research and the Max L. Thomas Distinguished Chair in Molecular Pulmonary Oncology. Investigators studied mouse and cellular models of NSCLC, a type of lung cancer that the American Cancer Society estimates accounts for 85 percent of all lung cancer cases in the United States. "Previous studies have shown that up to 70 percent of those cancers develop resistance to standard therapy, such as the platinum-taxane two-drug combo that is often given," said study senior author Dr. Elisabeth D. Martinez, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and in the Hamon Center. Both she and Dr. Minna are also members of UTSW's Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center. Using long-term on/off drug cycles, lead author and former postdoctoral researcher Dr. Maithili Dalvi developed a series of cellular models of progressive tumor resistance to standard chemotherapy that ranged from very sensitive to highly insensitive. Next, the researchers identified genes commonly altered during the development of resistance across multiple cell line and mouse models and identified a 35-gene signature that indicated a higher genetic likelihood of chemotherapy resistance. "It's like a fingerprint for resistance," Dr. Martinez said, adding that it was predictive in both cells and mouse models. Next they compared this resistance biomarker using genetic profiles from human tumors in their National Cancer Institute (NCI) lung cancer Specialized Programs of Research Excellence (SPORE) database at UT MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. The database contained information on patient outcomes and those who had been treated with the two-drug chemotherapy. The genetic fingerprint for resistance correlated with cancer relapse in NSCLC patients in the database, she said. Researchers discovered that as cancer cells developed greater resistance to chemotherapy, they progressively made higher amounts of enzymes called JumonjiC lysine demethylases. Dr. Martinez said these enzymes facilitate resistance by changing the expression of - or turning on and off - genes. "Cancer cells use these enzymes to change, or reprogram, gene expression in order to survive the toxic stress of the chemotherapy. By changing the expression of genes, the tumor cells can adapt and survive the toxins," she said. Investigators then tested two potential drugs, both JumonjiC inhibitors. One of them, JIB-04, was found by UT Southwestern researchers in the Martinez lab during a small-molecule screen conducted at the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences' Chemical Genomics Center in Bethesda, Maryland. "I believe this is the first report of NSCLC tumors taking advantage of multiple JumonjiC enzymes to reprogram gene expression in order to survive chemotoxic stress. In addition, and this is the most fascinating part: Dr. Dalvi found that greater chemotherapy resistance defines a new susceptibility to the JumonjiC inhibitors," she said. "The cancer cells develop a new Achilles' heel that we can hit." Because the chemo-resistant cancer cells are dependent on JumonjiC enzymes for survival, inhibiting those enzymes returns cancer cells to mortality and vulnerability to cell death, she explained. "We think these JumonjiC inhibitors have the potential to be used either to treat tumors once they become resistant to standard therapies, or to prevent resistance altogether," she said. "In our experiments these inhibitors appear to be much more potent in killing cancer cells than normal cells." Later, researchers tested whether the Jumonji inhibitors JIB-04 or GSK-J4 prevented chemotherapy resistance. This strategy succeeded in cell cultures and partially prevented resistance in animal models, Dr. Martinez said. Other UT Southwestern researchers involved in this work were Dr. Luc Girard, Assistant Professor, Dr. Lei Wang, senior research associate, and Dr. Juan Bayo, postdoctoral researcher, all with the Hamon Center and of Pharmacology; Dr. Rahul Kollipara, a computational biologist in the Eugene McDermott Center for Human Growth and Development; Hyunsil Park, a research associate, and Dr. Brenda Timmons, a research scientist, both of the Hamon Center; Paul Yenerall, graduate student; Dr. Yang Xie, Associate Professor of Clinical Sciences and of Bioinformatics; Dr. Adi F. Gazdar, Professor in the Hamon Center, the Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Pathology and holder of the W. Ray Wallace Distinguished Chair in Molecular Oncology Research; and Dr. Ralf Kittler, Assistant Professor in the McDermott Center, Pharmacology, and the Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center as well as a CPRIT Scholar and a John L. Roach Scholar in Biomedical Research. Researchers at MD Anderson Cancer Center, the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and The Ohio State University College of Medicine also contributed. The study received support from the NCI, the Department of Defense, the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT), the Friends of the Cancer Center, The Welch Foundation, and an LLS Robert Arceci Scholar Award. UT Southwestern, one of the premier academic medical centers in the nation, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution's faculty has received six Nobel Prizes, and includes 22 members of the National Academy of Sciences, 18 members of the National Academy of Medicine, and 14 Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigators. The faculty of more than 2,700 is responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and is committed to translating science-driven research quickly to new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide care in about 80 specialties to more than 100,000 hospitalized patients, 600,000 emergency room cases, and oversee approximately 2.2 million outpatient visits a year. This news release is available on our website at http://www. . To automatically receive news releases from UT Southwestern via email, subscribe at http://www.


Ottmann C.,Chemical Genomics Center | Van Der Hoorn R.A.L.,Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research | Kaiser M.,University of Duisburg - Essen
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2012

The pharmaceutical industry is reliant on a constant supply of new chemical entities and molecular targets for disease intervention. In this tutorial review, we want to illustrate that basic research studies on the biological function of natural products involved in plant-pathogen interactions can serve as an inspiring source for the identification of new bioactive entities as well as of strategies on how to achieve small molecule manipulation of biological systems. An application of findings from plant-pathogen interaction studies might therefore display a significant impact on drug discovery. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Vintonyak V.V.,Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology | Waldmann H.,Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology | Waldmann H.,TU Dortmund | Rauh D.,TU Dortmund | Rauh D.,Chemical Genomics Center
Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry | Year: 2011

The site specific functionalization of phosphate groups with amino acid side chains of substrate proteins represents one of the most important regulatory mechanisms of biological systems. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are reversibly catalyzed by protein kinases and protein phosphatases, and the aberrant regulation of these enzymes is associated with the onset and progression of various disease states such as cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative and autoimmune disorders, making these proteins attractive targets for drug discovery. Here we report on strategies currently explored for the identification and development of various inhibitors directed against clinically relevant phosphatases. While over the last years, inhibition of phosphorylation has evolved into a key strategy in targeted therapies, the development of clinically relevant phosphatase inhibitors still faces major bottlenecks and is often plagued by limited selectivity and unfavorable pharmacokinetics. The reader will gain a better understanding of the importance of the field and its current limitations. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Antonchick A.P.,Max Planck Institute Fu Molekulare Physiologie | Antonchick A.P.,TU Dortmund | Gerding-Reimers C.,Max Planck Institute Fu Molekulare Physiologie | Gerding-Reimers C.,TU Dortmund | And 7 more authors.
Nature Chemistry | Year: 2010

In biology-oriented synthesis the underlying scaffold classes of natural products selected in evolution are used to define biologically relevant starting points in chemical structure space for the synthesis of compound collections with focused structural diversity. Here we describe a highly enantioselective synthesis of natural-product-inspired 3,3′ -pyrrolidinyl spirooxindoles-which contain an all-carbon quaternary centre and three tertiary stereocentres. This synthesis takes place by means of an asymmetric Lewis acid-catalysed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of an azomethine ylide to a substituted 3-methylene-2-oxindole using 1-3 mol% of a chiral catalyst formed from a N,P-ferrocenyl ligand and CuPF6 (CH3 CN)4. Cellular evaluation has identified a molecule that arrests mitosis, induces multiple microtubule organizing centres and multipolar spindles, causes chromosome congression defects during mitosis and inhibits tubulin regrowth in cells. Our findings support the concept that compound collections based on natural-product-inspired scaffolds constructed with complex stereochemistry will be a rich source of compounds with diverse bioactivity. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Truebestein L.,University of Duisburg - Essen | Tennstaedt A.,University of Duisburg - Essen | Monig T.,Chemical Genomics Center | Krojer T.,Research Institute for Molecular Pathology IMP | And 4 more authors.
Nature Structural and Molecular Biology | Year: 2011

Crystal structures of active and inactive conformations of the human serine protease HTRA1 reveal that substrate binding to the active site is sufficient to stimulate proteolytic activity. HTRA1 attaches to liposomes, digests misfolded proteins into defined fragments and undergoes substrate-mediated oligomer conversion. In contrast to those of other serine proteases, the PDZ domain of HTRA1 is dispensable for activation or lipid attachment, indicative of different underlying mechanistic features. © 2011 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.


Molzan M.,Chemical Genomics Center | Weyand M.,University of Bayreuth | Rose R.,Chemical Genomics Center | Ottmann C.,Chemical Genomics Center
FEBS Journal | Year: 2012

Myeloid leukaemia factor 1 (MLF1) binds to 14-3-3 adapter proteins by a sequence surrounding Ser34 with the functional consequences of this interaction largely unknown. We present here the high-resolution crystal structure of this binding motif [MLF1(29-42)pSer34] in complex with 14-3-3ε and analyse the interaction with isothermal titration calorimetry. Fragment-based ligand discovery employing crystals of the binary 14-3-3ε/MLF1(29-42)pSer34 complex was used to identify a molecule that binds to the interface rim of the two proteins, potentially representing the starting point for the development of a small molecule that stabilizes the MLF1/14-3-3 protein-protein interaction. Such a compound might be used as a chemical biology tool to further analyse the 14-3-3/MLF1 interaction without the use of genetic methods. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.


Molzan M.,Chemical Genomics Center | Ottmann C.,Chemical Genomics Center
Journal of Molecular Biology | Year: 2012

C-RAF kinase is a central component of the Ras-RAF-MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase)-ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) pathway, which has been shown to be activated in 30% of human tumors. 14-3-3 proteins inactivate C-RAF by binding to the two N-terminal phosphorylation-dependent binding sites surrounding S233 and S259. 14-3-3 proteins can bind two target sequences located on one polypeptide chain simultaneously, thereby increasing binding affinity compared to single-site binding and possibly allowing regulated 14-3-3 binding through gatekeeper phosphorylation. To date, it was unclear whether 14-3-3 proteins can bind the two N-terminal phosphorylation-dependent binding sites of C-RAF simultaneously. Fluorescence polarization using phosphorylated peptides demonstrated that S233 is the low-affinity and S259 is the high-affinity binding site, while simultaneous engagement of both sites by 14-3-3ζ enhances affinity compared to single-site binding. Determination of a 1:1 stoichiometry for the di-phosphorylated peptide binding to one 14-3-3ζ dimer with isothermal titration calorimetry was supported by the crystal structure of the 14-3-3ζ/C-RAFpS233,pS259 complex. Cellular localization studies validate the significance of these sites for cytoplasmic retention of C-RAF, suggesting an extended mechanism of RAF regulation by 14-3-3 proteins. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Uhlenheuer D.A.,TU Eindhoven | Young J.F.,Chemical Genomics Center | Nguyen H.D.,Chemical Genomics Center | Scheepstra M.,TU Eindhoven | And 2 more authors.
Chemical Communications | Year: 2011

Cucurbit[8]uril is a supramolecular inducer of protein heterodimerization for proteins appended with methylviologen and naphthalene host elements. Two sets of fluorescent protein pairs, which visualize the specific protein assembly process, enabled the interplay of the supramolecular elements with the proteins to be established. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

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