Chemical and Veterinary Analytical Institute Munsterland Emscher Lippe CVUA MEL

Bad Münster am Stein-Ebernburg, Germany

Chemical and Veterinary Analytical Institute Munsterland Emscher Lippe CVUA MEL

Bad Münster am Stein-Ebernburg, Germany
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Van Asselt E.D.,Wageningen University | Kowalczyk J.,Federal Institute for Risk Assessment BfR | Van Eijkeren J.C.H.,National Institute of Public Health and the Environment RIVM | Zeilmaker M.J.,National Institute of Public Health and the Environment RIVM | And 4 more authors.
Food Chemistry | Year: 2013

Dietary intake is the predominant route for human exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS). Single pollution events may thus affect human exposure if polluted ground and water is used to produce animal feed or food. In this study, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK-) model is derived that describes the uptake of PFOS from contaminated feed by cows and its subsequent elimination through the cows' milk. Parameter values of the model were estimated by fitting to experimental data of a cow feeding trial. Model calculations showed that almost all PFOS ingested is excreted through the cows' milk. The elimination rate, however, was low as the estimated half-life in the cow was 56 days and it may, thus, take a long time after an initial pollution event to produce PFOS-free milk. The derived model can be used to estimate the transfer of PFOS through the dairy food chain and can be used for comparison of various contamination routes. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Kowalczyk J.,Federal Institute for Risk Assessment BfR | Ehlers S.,Chemical and Veterinary Analytical Institute Munsterland Emscher Lippe CVUA MEL | Furst P.,Chemical and Veterinary Analytical Institute Munsterland Emscher Lippe CVUA MEL | Schafft H.,Federal Institute for Risk Assessment BfR | Lahrssen-Wiederholt M.,Federal Institute for Risk Assessment BfR
Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology | Year: 2012

A pilot study was performed with dairy sheep to generate the first data on the transfer of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) from feed into food of animal origin. Corn silage was cultivated on cropland in Lower Saxony in Germany where, as a result of illegal waste disposal in 2006, farmland was contaminated with perfluorinated alkylacids (PFAAs). Two sheep were exposed by way of PFAA-contaminated corn silage to PFOS (1.16 and 1.45 μg/kg body weight [bw]/d, respectively) and PFOA (0.43 and 0.53 μg/kgbw/d) during a period of 21 days.During the PFAA-feeding period, PFOS levels in plasma increased continuously tomaximumconcentration of 103 and 240 μg/L for sheep 1 and sheep 2, respectively. The PFOA plasma concentration remained low (sheep 1 = 3.3 ± 2.2 μg/L; sheep 2 = 15.6 ± 8.3 μg/L). Data indicate that urinary excretion is the primary clearance route for PFOA (sheep 1 = 51 %; sheep 2 = 55 %), whereas PFOS excretion by way of urine could not be quantified. The highest PFOS excretion (4 to 5 %) was detected in faeces. PFOS was also excreted at higher levels than PFOA by way ofmilk. During a period of 21 days, a total PFOS transfer into milk ≤2 % was calculated. Overall, total excretion of PFOS was significantly lower compared with that of PFOA (PFOS 6 %; PFOA 53 to 56 %). PFOS levels in sheep 1 and sheep 2 were highest in liver (885 and 1,172 μg/kg weight wet [ww], respectively) and lowest in muscle tissue (24.4 and 35.1 μg/kg ww, respectively). PFOA levels in muscle tissue were low for sheep 2 (0.23 μg/kg ww) and not detectable after the PFAAfree feeding period in sheep 1. A slight background load of PFOS in liver (1.5 μg/kgww) and kidney (0.3 μg/kgww)was detected in sheep 3 (control). © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012.

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