Cambridge, MA, United States
Cambridge, MA, United States

Draper Laboratory is an American not-for-profit research and development organization, headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts; its official name is "The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc". The laboratory specializes in the design, development, and deployment of advanced technology solutions to problems in national security, space exploration, health care and energy.The laboratory was founded in 1932 by Charles Stark Draper at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to develop aeronautical instrumentation, and came to be called the "MIT Instrumentation Laboratory". It was renamed for its founder in 1970 and separated from MIT in 1973 to become an independent, non-profit organization.The expertise of the laboratory staff includes the areas of guidance, navigation, and control technologies and systems; fault-tolerant computing; advanced algorithms and software solutions; modeling and simulation; and microelectromechanical systems and multichip module technology. Wikipedia.


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Patent
Charles Stark Draper Laboratory | Date: 2017-04-26

A method for observing a subterranean reservoir penetrated by a production well and two or more injection wells. A first set of magnetic tracer particles is delivered to the reservoir by one injection well, while a second set of magnetic tracer particles is delivered to the reservoir via a second injection well. The first set of tracer particles includes a first identification element while the second set of tracer particles includes a second identification element. The presence or absence of particles from the first set or second set of tracer particles in fluid produced from the production well is determined by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy or another analogous technique using the identification elements in the production fluid. The tracer particles are concentrated in the production fluid by magnetic extraction. The fluid flow (or absence thereof) from a particular injection well to the production well can thus be determined.


Patent
Charles Stark Draper Laboratory | Date: 2016-11-28

Systems, methods, and compositions for removing organophosphate toxins from blood are disclosed herein. The compositions include a lipid-based capture particle that displays BChE that binds to the toxin. The methods include acoustically separating toxins bound to lipid-based capture particles from blood factors of whole blood.


Patent
Charles Stark Draper Laboratory and Massachusetts Institute of Technology | Date: 2016-11-23

The systems and methods disclosed herein are generally related to a cell culture system. More particularly, the systems and methods enable the culturing and interconnecting of a plurality of tissue types in a biomimetic environment. By culturing organ specific tissue types within a biomimetic environment and interconnecting each of the organ systems in a physiologically meaningful way, experiments can be conducted on in vitro cells that substantially mimic the responses of in vivo cell populations. In some implementations, the system is used to monitor how organ systems respond to agents such as toxins or medications. The system enables the precise and controlled delivery of these agents, which, in some implementations, enables the biomimetic dosing of drugs in humans to be mimicked.


Patent
Charles Stark Draper Laboratory | Date: 2016-11-23

According to various aspects and embodiments, a system and method for treating a target condition are provided. The treatment system may comprise a launch platform, a light source, and a controller coupled to the light source. The launch platform may include a substrate, a layer of absorption material, and a layer of microparticles comprising at least one therapeutic agent. The microparticles may be launched from the launch platform using light energy emitted from the light source and directed to a target condition for purposes of delivering a therapeutic agent to the target condition.


Patent
Charles Stark Draper Laboratory | Date: 2017-03-29

Defects in ferromagnetic materials are detected and characterized by analyzing the items magnetic fields to find portions of the magnetic fields that differ in characteristic ways from residual magnetic fields generated by non-defective portions of the items. The portions of the magnetic fields that differ in the characteristic ways correspond to locations of the defects. The residual magnetic fields correspond to portions of the items distant from the defects. The defect characterization may include volume of material lost due to each defect and/or width and/or depth of each defect.


Patent
Charles Stark Draper Laboratory | Date: 2017-03-01

The present disclosure describes a blood oxygenator that includes a checkerboard layout of fluid (e.g., blood) and gas (e.g., oxygen) channels. When viewed as a cross-section through each of the channels of the oxygenator, the checkerboard configuration includes alternating gas and fluid channels in both the x-axis (e.g., in-plane) and in the y-axis (e.g., out-of-plane) directions. The oxygenator described herein reduces manufacturing complexity by using first, second, and third polymer layers that include asymmetrical channel designs. The channel designs include open gas channels, which are exposed to the ambient atmosphere. The oxygenator is placed within a pressure vessel to drive gas into each of the open gas channels, which in some implementations, negates the need for a gas manifold.


Patent
Charles Stark Draper Laboratory | Date: 2016-11-21

The present disclosure describes a closely spaced array of penetrating electrodes. In some implementations, the electrodes of the array are spaced less than 50 m apart. The present disclosure also describes methods for manufacturing the closely spaced array of penetrating electrodes. In some implementations, each row of electrode of the array is manufactured in-plane and then coupled to other rows of electrodes to form an array.


Patent
Charles Stark Draper Laboratory | Date: 2017-02-07

Techniques are described for metadata processing that can be used to encode an arbitrary number of security policies for code running on a processor. Metadata may be added to every word in the system and a metadata processing unit may be used that works in parallel with data flow to enforce an arbitrary set of policies. In one aspect, the metadata may be characterized as unbounded and software programmable to be applicable to a wide range of metadata processing policies. Techniques and policies have a wide range of uses including, for example, safety, security, and synchronization. Additionally, described are aspects and techniques in connection with metadata processing in an embodiment based on the RISC-V architecture.


Patent
Charles Stark Draper Laboratory | Date: 2016-05-31

Techniques are described for metadata processing that can be used to encode an arbitrary number of security policies for code running on a processor. Metadata may be added to every word in the system and a metadata processing unit may be used that works in parallel with data flow to enforce an arbitrary set of policies. In one aspect, the metadata may be characterized as unbounded and software programmable to be applicable to a wide range of metadata processing policies. Techniques and policies have a wide range of uses including, for example, safety, security, and synchronization. Additionally, described are aspects and techniques in connection with metadata processing in an embodiment based on the RISC-V architecture.


Patent
Charles Stark Draper Laboratory | Date: 2017-02-14

A method for bonding a hermetic module to an electrode array including the steps of: providing the electrode array having a flexible substrate with a top surface and a bottom surface and including a plurality of pads in the top surface of the substrate; attaching the hermetic module to the bottom surface of the electrode array, the hermetic module having a plurality of bond-pads wherein each bond-pad is adjacent to the bottom surface of the electrode array and aligns with a respective pad; drill holes through each pad to the corresponding bond-pad; filling each hole with biocompatible conductive ink; forming a rivet on the biocompatible conductive ink over each pad; and overmolding the electrode array with a moisture barrier material.

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