Charite University Medicine Campus Mitte

Berlin, Germany

Charite University Medicine Campus Mitte

Berlin, Germany
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Senkowski D.,University of Hamburg | Senkowski D.,Charite University Medicine Campus Mitte | Kautz J.,University of Hamburg | Hauck M.,University of Hamburg | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Neuroscience | Year: 2011

Painful events in our environment are often accompanied by stimuli from other sensory modalities. These stimuli may influence the perception and processing of acute pain, in particular when they comprise emotional cues, like facial expressions of people surrounding us. In this whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) study, we examined the neuronal mechanisms underlying the influence of emotional (fearful, angry, or happy) compared to neutral facial expressions on the processing of pain in humans. Independent of their valence, subjective pain ratings for intracutaneous inputs were higher when pain stimuli were presented together with emotional facial expressions than when they were presented with a neutral facial expression. Source reconstruction using linear beamforming revealed pain-induced early (70-270 ms) oscillatory beta-band activity (BBA; 15-25 Hz) and gamma-band activity (GBA; 60-80 Hz) in the sensorimotor cortex. The presentation of faces with emotional expressions compared to faces with neutral expressions led to a stronger bilateral suppression of the pain-induced BBA, possibly reflecting enhanced response readiness of the sensorimotor system. Moreover, pain-induced GBA in the sensorimotor cortex was larger for faces expressing fear than for faces expressing anger, which might reflect the facilitation of avoidance-motivated behavior triggered by the concurrent presentation of faces with fearful expressions and painful stimuli. Thus, the presence of emotional cues, like facial expressions from people surrounding us, while receiving acute pain may facilitate neuronal processes involved in the preparation and execution of adequate protective motor responses. © 2011 the authors.


Schilling C.,Charite University Medicine Campus Mitte | Schilling C.,Humboldt University of Berlin | Kuhn S.,Charite University Medicine Campus Mitte | Kuhn S.,Ghent Institute for Functional and Metabolic Imaging | And 4 more authors.
NeuroImage | Year: 2012

Background: Impulsiveness is a central domain of human personality and of relevance for the development of substance use and certain psychiatric disorders. This study investigates whether there are overlapping as well as distinct structural cerebral correlates of attentional, motor and nonplanning impulsiveness in healthy adults. Methods: High-resolution magnetic resonance scans were acquired in 32 healthy adults to model the gray-white and gray-cerebrospinal fluid borders for each individual cortex and to compute the distance of these surfaces as a measure of cortical thickness (CT). Associations between CT and the dimensions of impulsiveness (Barratt-Impulsiveness-Scale 11, BIS) were identified in entire cortex analyses. Results: We observed a significant negative correlation between left middle frontal gyrus (MFG) CT and the attention BIS score (FDR p < .05), motor, nonplanning and total BIS score (each p < 0.001 uncorrected). In addition, CT of the orbitofrontal (OFC) and superior frontal gyrus (SFG) were inversely correlated (p < 0.001 uncorrected) with BIS total and motor score. Among other negative associations only one positive correlation (right inferior temporal with nonplanning score, p < 0.001 uncorrected) was found. Conclusions: The MFG is crucial for top-down control, executive and attentional processes. The MFG together with the OFC and SFG appears to be part of brain structures, which have previously been shown to mediate behavioral inhibition, well-planned action and attention, which are core facets of impulsiveness as measured with the Barratt-Impulsiveness-Scale. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.


Schilling C.,Charite University Medicine Campus Mitte | Schilling C.,Humboldt University of Berlin | Kuhn S.,Charite University Medicine Campus Mitte | Kuhn S.,Ghent Institute for Functional and Metabolic Imaging | And 27 more authors.
Molecular Psychiatry | Year: 2013

Impulsiveness is a pivotal personality trait representing a core domain in all major personality inventories. Recently, impulsiveness has been identified as an important modulator of cognitive processing, particularly in tasks that require the processing of large amounts of information. Although brain imaging studies have implicated the prefrontal cortex to be a common underlying representation of impulsiveness and related cognitive functioning, to date a fine-grain and detailed morphometric analysis has not been carried out. On the basis of ahigh-resolution magnetic resonance scans acquired in 1620 healthy adolescents (IMAGEN), the individual cortical thickness (CT) was estimated. Correlations between Cloninger's impulsiveness and CT were studied in an entire cortex analysis. The cluster identified was tested for associations with performance in perceptual reasoning tasks of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC IV). We observed a significant inverse correlation between trait impulsiveness and CT of the left superior frontal cortex (SFC; Monte Carlo Simulation P<0.01). CT within this cluster correlated with perceptual reasoning scores (Bonferroni corrected) of the WISC IV. On the basis of a large sample of adolescents, we identified an extended area in the SFC as a correlate of impulsiveness, which appears to be in line with the trait character of this prominent personality facet. The association of SFC thickness with perceptual reasoning argues for a common neurobiological basis of personality and specific cognitive domains comprising attention, spatial reasoning and response selection. The results may facilitate the understanding of the role of impulsiveness in several psychiatric disorders associated with prefrontal dysfunctions and cognitive deficits. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved.


Hauser M.,The Zucker Hillside Hospital | Hauser M.,Charite University Medicine Campus Mitte | Knoblich G.,Radboud University Nijmegen | Repp B.H.,Haskins Laboratories | And 4 more authors.
Psychiatry Research | Year: 2011

The mechanisms underlying distortions in sense of agency, i.e. the experience of controlling one's own actions and their consequences, in schizophrenia are not fully understood and have barely been investigated in patients classified as being in a putative psychotic prodrome. This study aims to expound the contribution of early and late illness-related processes. Thirty schizophrenia patients, 30 putatively prodromal patients and 30 healthy controls were instructed to reproduce a computer-generated series of drum sounds on a drum pad. While tapping, subjects heard either their self-produced tones or a computer-controlled reproduction of the drum tone series that used either exactly the same, an accelerated or decelerated tempo. Subjects had to determine the source of agency. Results show similar significant impairments in assigning the source of agency under ambiguous conditions in schizophrenia and putatively prodromal patients and an exaggerated self-attribution bias, both of which were significantly correlated with increased (ego-)psychopathology. Patient groups, however, benefited significantly more than controls from additional sensorimotor cues to agency. Sensorimotor input seems to be a compensatory mechanism involved in correctly attributing agency. We deduce that altered awareness of agency may hold promise as an additional risk factor for psychosis. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Charite University Medicine Campus Mitte, University of Bonn, University of Cologne, University of Hamburg and 5 more.
Type: | Journal: Early intervention in psychiatry | Year: 2015

Schizophrenia is a heterogeneous disorder that presents differently in men and women: men show a higher propensity to negative symptoms, lower social functioning, earlier age at onset and co-morbid substance abuse, whereas women display more affective symptoms. It is unknown whether these differences extend to subjects at high risk (HR) of psychosis. Thus, the aim of the present study was to address this question.Clinical symptoms and functioning were assessed using structured interviews in 239 HR subjects (female, n=80). The definition of being at HR was based on the criteria used in the European Prediction of Psychosis Study (EPOS).Men displayed more pronounced negative symptoms, higher rates of past substance abuse disorders and higher deficits in social functioning. No gender difference was found for depression, which affected almost 50% of the cohort, or age at onset for the fulfilment of HR criteria.The higher impairment in specific symptoms observed in male schizophrenia patients was also present in subjects at HR for psychosis. Further studies are required to determine whether these symptoms are gender-specific predictors of transition to psychosis and whether they warrant gender-specific interventions. The high propensity to depression in the present cohort, which was particularly pronounced in the male cohort compared with the general population, in conjunction with the observed increase in negative symptoms and functional impairment, should alert clinicians to the necessity for the identification and treatment of HR subjects, irrespective of the degree to which these features are associated with transition risk.


PubMed | Charite University Medicine Campus Mitte, University of Bonn, University of Cologne, University of Hamburg and 6 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Psychological medicine | Year: 2016

Patients with psychosis display the so-called Jumping to Conclusions bias (JTC) - a tendency for hasty decision-making in probabilistic reasoning tasks. So far, only a few studies have evaluated the JTC bias in at-risk mental state (ARMS) patients, specifically in ARMS samples fulfilling ultra-high risk (UHR) criteria, thus not allowing for comparisons between different ARMS subgroups.In the framework of the PREVENT (secondary prevention of schizophrenia) study, a JTC task was applied to 188 patients either fulfilling UHR criteria or presenting with cognitive basic symptoms (BS). Similar data were available for 30 healthy control participants matched for age, gender, education and premorbid verbal intelligence. ARMS patients were identified by the Structured Interview for Prodromal Symptoms (SIPS) and the Schizophrenia Proneness Instrument - Adult Version (SPI-A).The mean number of draws to decision (DTD) significantly differed between ARM -subgroups: UHR patients made significantly less draws to make a decision than ARMS patients with only cognitive BS. Furthermore, UHR patients tended to fulfil behavioural criteria for JTC more often than BS patients. In a secondary analysis, ARMS patients were much hastier in their decision-making than controls. In patients, DTD was moderately associated with positive and negative symptoms as well as disorganization and excitement.Our data indicate an enhanced JTC bias in the UHR group compared to ARMS patients with only cognitive BS. This underscores the importance of reasoning deficits within cognitive theories of the developing psychosis. Interactions with the liability to psychotic transitions and therapeutic interventions should be unravelled in longitudinal studies.


Bechdolf A.,University of Cologne | Muller H.,University of Cologne | Stutzer H.,University of Cologne | Wagner M.,University of Bonn | And 15 more authors.
Schizophrenia Bulletin | Year: 2011

Antipsychotics, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and omega-3-fatty acids have been found superior to control conditions as regards prevention of psychosis in people at-risk of first-episode psychosis. However, no large-scale trial evaluating the differential efficacy of CBT and antipsychotics has been performed yet. In PREVENT, we evaluate CBT, aripiprazole, and clinical management (CM) as well as placebo and CM for the prevention of psychosis in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with regard to the antipsychotic intervention and a randomized controlled trial with regard to the CBT intervention with blinded ratings. The hypotheses are first that CBT and aripiprazole and CM are superior to placebo and CM and second that CBT is not inferior to aripiprazole and CM combined. The primary outcome is transition to psychosis. By November 2010, 156 patients were recruited into the trial. The subjects were substantially functionally compromised (Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale mean score 52.5) and 78.3% presented with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition axis I comorbid diagnosis. Prior to randomization, 51.5% of the participants preferred to be randomized into the CBT arm, whereas only 12.9% preferred pharmacological treatment. First, assessments of audiotaped treatment sessions confirmed the application of CBT-specific skills in the CBT condition and the absence of those in CM. The overall quality rating of the CBT techniques applied in the CBT condition was good. When the final results of the trial are available, PREVENT will substantially expand the current limited evidence base for best clinical practice in people at-risk (prodromal) of first-episode psychosis. © 2011 The Author.


Hauser M.,Charite University Medicine Campus Mitte | Hauser M.,The Zucker Hillside Hospital | Moore J.W.,University of Cambridge | de Millas W.,Charite University Medicine Campus Mitte | And 4 more authors.
Schizophrenia Research | Year: 2011

Background: Sense of agency (SoAg) - the experience of controlling one's own actions and their consequences - has been studied in schizophrenia but not in the earlier stages of the disease, i.e. in patients with a putative psychotic prodrome (PP). Previous research has shown that time judgments of voluntary actions can provide an implicit measure of the SoAg. Method: 30 PP patients and 30 healthy controls performed voluntary key presses while watching a rotating clock hand on a monitor. After each key press they had to estimate the time of the action (based on the perceived position of the clock hand at the time of the key press). By varying the probability with which the simple manual action was followed by a tone, we investigated whether shifts in perceptual estimates of the operant action towards a resulting effect depended on the actual occurrence of the effect (retrospective process) or on the prediction that the effect will occur. Results: PP patients differed from healthy controls but their results did not resemble previous findings in schizophrenia patients. PP patients showed numerically - but not significantly - stronger temporal linkage between action and consequence than healthy controls. Retrospective and predictive influences on action binding were stronger in PP patients. Furthermore, the altered influence of prediction was significantly correlated to ego-psychopathology. Discussion: Distortions of agency constitute a core feature of the disease that is already present in the PP but may evolve further with progression of the illness. Distortions of agency may thus represent a promising additional predictive risk factor for transition to psychosis in PP patients. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | Charite University Medicine Campus Mitte
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Human brain mapping | Year: 2013

Trait impulsiveness is a potential factor that predicts both substance use and certain psychiatric disorders. This study investigates whether there are common structural cerebral correlates of trait impulsiveness and cognitive functioning in a large sample of healthy adolescents from the IMAGEN project.Clusters of gray matter (GM) volume associated with trait impulsiveness, Cloningers revised temperament, and character inventory impulsiveness (TCI-R-I) were identified in a whole brain analysis using optimized voxel-based morphometry in 115 healthy 14-year-olds. The clusters were tested for correlations with performance on the nonverbal tests (Block Design, BD; Matrix Reasoning, MT) of the Wechsler Scale of Intelligence for Children IV reflecting perceptual reasoning.Cloningers impulsiveness (TCI-R-I) score was significantly inversely associated with GM volume in left orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Frontal clusters found were positively correlated with performance in perceptual reasoning tasks (Bonferroni corrected). No significant correlations between TCI-R-I and perceptual reasoning were observed.The neural correlate of trait impulsiveness in the OFC matches an area where brain function has previously been related to inhibitory control. Additionally, orbitofrontal GM volume was associated with scores for perceptual reasoning. The data show for the first time structural correlates of both cognitive functioning and impulsiveness in healthy adolescent subjects.


PubMed | Charite University Medicine Campus Mitte
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Molecular psychiatry | Year: 2013

Impulsiveness is a pivotal personality trait representing a core domain in all major personality inventories. Recently, impulsiveness has been identified as an important modulator of cognitive processing, particularly in tasks that require the processing of large amounts of information. Although brain imaging studies have implicated the prefrontal cortex to be a common underlying representation of impulsiveness and related cognitive functioning, to date a fine-grain and detailed morphometric analysis has not been carried out. On the basis of ahigh-resolution magnetic resonance scans acquired in 1620 healthy adolescents (IMAGEN), the individual cortical thickness (CT) was estimated. Correlations between Cloningers impulsiveness and CT were studied in an entire cortex analysis. The cluster identified was tested for associations with performance in perceptual reasoning tasks of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC IV). We observed a significant inverse correlation between trait impulsiveness and CT of the left superior frontal cortex (SFC; Monte Carlo Simulation P<0.01). CT within this cluster correlated with perceptual reasoning scores (Bonferroni corrected) of the WISC IV. On the basis of a large sample of adolescents, we identified an extended area in the SFC as a correlate of impulsiveness, which appears to be in line with the trait character of this prominent personality facet. The association of SFC thickness with perceptual reasoning argues for a common neurobiological basis of personality and specific cognitive domains comprising attention, spatial reasoning and response selection. The results may facilitate the understanding of the role of impulsiveness in several psychiatric disorders associated with prefrontal dysfunctions and cognitive deficits.

Loading Charite University Medicine Campus Mitte collaborators
Loading Charite University Medicine Campus Mitte collaborators