CeRMS

Sant'Ambrogio di Torino, Italy
Sant'Ambrogio di Torino, Italy
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D'Amico L.,University of Basel | Belisario D.,University of Basel | Migliardi G.,Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment | Grange C.,University of Turin | And 10 more authors.
Oncotarget | Year: 2016

Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are key players in bone metastasis. In some renal tumors CSCs overexpress the HGF receptor c-MET, speculating that c-MET targeting could lead to bone metastasis inhibition. To address this hypothesis we isolated renal CD105+/CD24-CSCs, expressing c-MET receptor from a primary renal carcinoma. Then, to study their ability to metastasize to bone, we injected renal CSCs in NOD/ SCID mice implanted with a human bone and we tested the effect of a c-MET inhibitor (JNJ-38877605) on bone metastasis development. JNJ-38877605 inhibited the formation of metastases at bone implant site. We showed that JNJ-38877605 inhibited the activation of osteoclasts induced by RCC stem cells and it stimulated osteoblast activity, finally resulting in a reduction of bone turnover consistent with the inhibition of bone metastases. We measured the circulating levels of osteotropic factors induced by RCC stem cells in the sera of mice treated with c-Met inhibitor, showing that IL-11 and CCL20 were reduced in mice treated with JNJ-38877605, strongly supporting the involvement of c-MET in the regulation of this process. To address the clinical relevance of c-MET upregulation during tumor progression, we analysed c-MET in renal cancer patients detecting an increased expression in the bone metastatic lesions by IHC. Then, we dosed CCL20 serum levels resulting significantly increased in patients with bone metastases compared to non-metastatic ones. Collectively, our data highlight the importance of the c-MET pathway in the pathogenesis of bone metastases induced by RCC stem cells in mice and humans.


PubMed | CeRMS, CTO Hospital, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Clinic of Internal Medicine and 5 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Oncotarget | Year: 2016

Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are key players in bone metastasis. In some renal tumors CSCs overexpress the HGF receptor c-MET, speculating that c-MET targeting could lead to bone metastasis inhibition. To address this hypothesis we isolated renal CD105+/CD24-CSCs, expressing c-MET receptor from a primary renal carcinoma. Then, to study their ability to metastasize to bone, we injected renal CSCs in NOD/SCID mice implanted with a human bone and we tested the effect of a c-MET inhibitor (JNJ-38877605) on bone metastasis development. JNJ-38877605 inhibited the formation of metastases at bone implant site. We showed that JNJ-38877605 inhibited the activation of osteoclasts induced by RCC stem cells and it stimulated osteoblast activity, finally resulting in a reduction of bone turnover consistent with the inhibition of bone metastases. We measured the circulating levels of osteotropic factors induced by RCC stem cells in the sera of mice treated with c-Met inhibitor, showing that IL-11 and CCL20 were reduced in mice treated with JNJ-38877605, strongly supporting the involvement of c-MET in the regulation of this process. To address the clinical relevance of c-MET upregulation during tumor progression, we analysed c-MET in renal cancer patients detecting an increased expression in the bone metastatic lesions by IHC. Then, we dosed CCL20 serum levels resulting significantly increased in patients with bone metastases compared to non-metastatic ones. Collectively, our data highlight the importance of the c-MET pathway in the pathogenesis of bone metastases induced by RCC stem cells in mice and humans.


PubMed | Skin Bank, CeRMS and CTO Hospital
Type: | Journal: Stem cells international | Year: 2016

Osteoarthritis is characterized by loss of articular cartilage also due to reduced chondrogenic activity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from patients. Adipose tissue is an attractive source of MSCs (ATD-MSCs), representing an effective tool for reparative medicine, particularly for treatment of osteoarthritis, due to their chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation capability. The treatment of symptomatic knee arthritis with ATD-MSCs proved effective with a single infusion, but multiple infusions could be also more efficacious. Here we studied some crucial aspects of adipose tissue banking procedures, evaluating ATD-MSCs viability, and differentiation capability after cryopreservation, to guarantee the quality of the tissue for multiple infusions. We reported that the presence of local anesthetic during lipoaspiration negatively affects cell viability of cryopreserved adipose tissue and cell growth of ATD-MSCs in culture. We observed that DMSO guarantees a faster growth of ATD-MSCs in culture than trehalose. At last, ATD-MSCs derived from fresh and cryopreserved samples at -80C and -196C showed viability and differentiation ability comparable to fresh samples. These data indicate that cryopreservation of adipose tissue at -80C and -196C is equivalent and preserves the content of ATD-MSCs in Stromal Vascular Fraction (SVF), guaranteeing the differentiation ability of ATD-MSCs.


Roato I.,CeRMS | Ferracini R.,A.O. Citta della Salute e della Science di Turin
Clinical Reviews in Bone and Mineral Metabolism | Year: 2013

Bone metastases are a dismal consequence of cancer, causing severe morbidity and reducing the quality of life of patients. Solid tumours such as breast, prostate, lung and kidney cancer showed a marked osteotropism dependent on the special microenvironment provided by bone. Different cellular types are involved in the formation of bone metastases, indeed bone, immune system and tumour cells interact leading to bone lesions. During the bone resorption process, there is an intense cross-talk between immune system cells and osteoclasts (OCs). In particular, T cells release factors and cytokines, which rule osteoclastogenesis, and on the other hand, OCs produce factors that act on T cells, which are mediators of the tumour growth in bone. This review will summarize the main mechanisms of action in cancer-induced bone disease with particular regard to the cross-talk among cells of bone, tumour and immune system, focusing on factors and cytokines released by osteoclast, osteoblast, tumour cells and T cells. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Roato I.,CeRMS
Clinical and Developmental Immunology | Year: 2013

Bone metastases are a dismal consequence for different types of solid tumors, such as breast, prostate, lung, and kidney cancer. The mechanisms regulating the interactions among bone, immune system, and tumor cells have been deeply investigated, and many studies are ongoing to define the specific role of the different cells in the bone metastatic process. The affinity of some tumors to growth in bone results from the special microenvironment provided by bone. Moreover, immune system and bone have a bidirectional relationship: bone cells express surface molecules ruling the expansion of hemopoietic stem cells from which all cells of the mammalian immune system derive, and various immunoregulatory cytokines influence the fate of bone cells. The last findings allow to extend the concept of vicious cycle and add T cells as mediators of the tumor growth in bone. © 2013 Ilaria Roato.

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