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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.spie.org

A new technique that computes the eigenmodes of the eddy-current problem provides an aid to classification using broadband electromagnetic induction sensors. Electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensors excel at detecting even small fragments of metal that are buried underground. The sensors work according to the principle that time-varying magnetic fields cause electrical currents to flow in conductive media. These electrical currents, called eddy currents because of their circular path, produce a secondary magnetic field that signals the presence of nearby metal. This mechanism is shown in Figure 1. For many applications, such as landmine detection, establishing the presence of metal alone is not useful because of the ubiquity of metallic clutter. Broadband sensors, which transmit and receive signals over a large frequency band, provide a way around this problem. The additional data collected by these sensors can be used to determine whether a metal target is of interest or not. The broadband data can also be used to estimate the target's orientation and position underground.1, 2 The main challenge is to make effective use of the broadband data collected by the sensor. The target is characterized by how the flow of eddy currents changes when it is excited at different frequencies. However, the flow of eddy currents also depends on the target's positioning relative to the sensor and its orientation. Creating a dictionary for the responses of each target of interest at each position and orientation is not computationally feasible. A much more attractive approach is to perform a modal analysis of the target so that its frequency response is interpreted as the contribution of several eddy-current modes, each with a corresponding relaxation frequency.3 This is analogous to characterizing the vibration of a string as an excitation of different standing waves. In order to perform the modal analysis of a specific target type, first a linear system that describes the eddy-current response of the target to a magnetic field is constructed. This system is then decomposed using an eigenvalue solver to find its natural modes and their corresponding relaxation frequencies. Because the linear system is treated as an eigenvalue problem, the nature of the excitation does not factor in the analysis. Once the modes of the problem are known, it is possible to easily find the response of the target to any excitation, at any of the possible orientations of the target relative to the sensor. Since the relaxation frequencies of the target are independent of the excitation, they do not change as the sensor moves over a target. This is an important property that is used for target classification. Additionally, the magnetic dipole moment of each particular eddy-current mode captures all of its scattering behavior within six scalar values.4 We chose to use the finite integration technique (FIT) to model the electromagnetic interactions. FIT is a differential method where Maxwell equations in integral form are applied to a set of staggered grids.5 The linear systems that are constructed are very large and sparse, often with many millions of unknowns. This is because the analysis is three dimensional and because differential methods require that, in addition to the target, a large region surrounding it must be discretized as well. Finding the eigenmodes of these systems is challenging because of the size and structure of the system matrices. The nature of the problem requires that the smallest eigenvalues of the system be found. Storage and computational constraints mean that finding all the eigenmodes of the system is not possible. Additionally, the formulation of the linear system introduces a large, non-physical null space, which complicates the computation of the system's smallest eigenvalues. Traditionally, these types of problems are solved using a factorization of the system matrices and the application of a Lanczos-based eigensolver that computes only a subset of the eigenmodes. This is not a feasible strategy in this case because of the storage requirements of such a factorization. Instead, we implemented a Jacobi–Davidson eigensolver, which requires no factorization and which employs a special strategy to avoid the linear system's null space.6, 7 The approach taken also employs a form of domain decomposition that eliminates the degrees of freedom associated with fields exterior to the target. This is a necessary step to avoid the system's null space but it conveniently also reduces the storage requirements for the eigenmodes. Figure 2 shows cross sections of the computed magnetic induction associated with the first eddy-current modes of a spherical and cubical conductor. Using this approach, we decomposed the eddy-current response of arbitrarily shaped conductors into their fundamental modes. Using this approach, we decomposed the eddy-current response of arbitrarily shaped conductors into their fundamental modes. Such a decomposition is valuable because it captures a fundamental aspect of the conducting target's geometry and material properties. This aspect is independent of excitation and provides a reliable signature for targets of its type. The obtained compact signature allows for position and orientation inversion that jointly utilizes measurements that were taken at different positions over the target. With this Jacobi–Davidson-based approach, we can derive physical broadband models for conducting objects that can be used for both the detection and classification of buried objects. The use of broadband models greatly aids in minimizing the number of false alarms triggered by benign metallic clutter. In the future, we would like to improve the accuracy of the computed field interactions on the target's exterior, and we would also like to extend this work to permeable targets. This material is based upon work supported in part by the US Office of Naval Research as a Multi-disciplinary University Research Initiative on Sound and Electromagnetic Interacting Waves under grant N00014-10-1-0958, in part by the US Army REDCOM CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate, Science and Technology Division, Countermine Branch, and in part by the US Army Research Office under grant W911NF-11-1-0153.


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.gizmag.com

Information is power when a soldier is enveloped by the fog of war. Precisely locating the positions of both friends and foes is key for a mission to roll out both smoothly and without avoidable casualties. The US Army has just revealed its latest innovation, a head-up display system for soldiers called "Tactical Augmented Reality," or TAR. The TAR system is a small, one-inch-by-one-inch (2.5 x 2.5 cm) eyepiece that is mounted on a soldier's helmet. The eyepiece overlays a map onto the soldier's field of vision, instantly offering target information and GPS-tracked data showing where the rest of their team is located. Designed to replace a soldier's handheld GPS device, the TAR device is also wirelessly connected to a tablet worn on a soldier's waist, and to a thermal site mounted on the their rifle. This means additional data, such as an image of the target or the distance to a target, can be displayed through the eyepiece. This visual data can also be wirelessly sent to the eyepieces of other members of the team. The TAR is similar to another head-up display being developed by BAE Systems called the Q-Warrior. That device, which has already been field tested by the US Army, is a little bulkier than this system from CERDEC. The main challenge CERDEC faced in developing TAR was finding a way to miniaturize a high-definition image to fit on such a small eyepiece and couldn't be achieved with commercial, off-the-shelf hardware. They have successfully created high-definition monochrome units that are bright enough to be used in daylight, and development of full-color units are well underway. Take a look at a simulation of the new TAR device in the video below.


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.gizmag.com

Information is power when a soldier is enveloped by the fog of war. Precisely locating the positions of both friends and foes is key for a mission to roll out both smoothly and without avoidable casualties. The US Army has just revealed its latest innovation, a head-up display system for soldiers called "Tactical Augmented Reality," or TAR. The TAR system is a small, one-inch-by-one-inch (2.5 x 2.5 cm) eyepiece that is mounted on a soldier's helmet. The eyepiece overlays a map onto the soldier's field of vision, instantly offering target information and GPS-tracked data showing where the rest of their team is located. Designed to replace a soldier's handheld GPS device, the TAR device is also wirelessly connected to a tablet worn on a soldier's waist, and to a thermal site mounted on the their rifle. This means additional data, such as an image of the target or the distance to a target, can be displayed through the eyepiece. This visual data can also be wirelessly sent to the eyepieces of other members of the team. The TAR is similar to another head-up display being developed by BAE Systems called the Q-Warrior. That device, which has already been field tested by the US Army, is a little bulkier than this system from CERDEC. The main challenge CERDEC faced in developing TAR was finding a way to miniaturize a high-definition image to fit on such a small eyepiece and couldn't be achieved with commercial, off-the-shelf hardware. They have successfully created high-definition monochrome units that are bright enough to be used in daylight, and development of full-color units are well underway. Take a look at a simulation of the new TAR device in the video below.


PRINCETON, N.J., May 25, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- BANC3 is pleased to announce its selection as a prime contractor for the Department of the Army's $37.4 Billion Responsive Strategic Sourcing for Services (RS3) contract. RS3, with a period of performance of 10 years, covers professional services for government programs with Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) requirements. RS3 primary service areas include Engineering; Research, Development, Test and Evaluation (RDT&E); Logistics; Acquisition and Strategic Planning; Education and Training Services. This award continues BANC3's strong trend of successful contracts for the Department of Defense C4ISR community, reinforcing its powerful ability to compete and provide professional services in a multitude of diverse areas. RS3 is the largest ID/IQ contract won by BANC3, building upon other wins with customers including US Army Communications Electronics Research and Development Engineering Center (CERDEC) Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) WEBS, CECOM Software Engineering Center (SEC) SSES NexGen, CERDEC Command Power and Integration Directorate (CP&ID), and Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) Tactical Mission Command Applications (TMCA).


Dawidowicz E.,CERDEC
SAE International Journal of Alternative Powertrains | Year: 2012

The effectiveness of elements comprising a hybrid electric power generating system was studied. The wind and photovoltaic renewable resources served as integral components of the hybrid systems configuration. A HMMWV towable trailer system provided an intermediary basis for formulation of methodology needed for optimization of power generation and energy storage capacity constrained by cost, size and weight of the system. The methodology employed in this paper is scalable from kilowatts to megawatts or from man portable systems to significantly larger systems which can be housed in 40 foot ISO containers. Copyright © 2012 SAE International.


DoD Future Warfighter Performance, Capabilities and Survivability to be the Focus of Upcoming Senior Level Symposium for DoD, Industry and Academia On April 25-26, 2017, senior leaders within the U.S. Military Services, DoD, Industry and Academia will convene in Alexandria, VA, for two days of off the record briefings and senior level discussions at Defense Strategies Institute’s "Town Hall" Future Warfighter Symposium. The Symposium will take an integrated approach, spanning multiple capabilities and research areas that ultimately combine on the dismounted Warfighter. Washington, DC, March 01, 2017 --( 1. Advanced materials and fabrics to aide in clothing efficiencies 2. Wearable robotics and advancements in human-machine integration 3. Next-gen research in personal protective equipment / exoskeletons: malleable fabric exosuits, and "liquid armour" and buoyant body armor 4. Energy and Power for the dismounted Soldier: energy harvesting capabilities, improved battery power (supplying, harnessing and generating power) 5. Research and technologies in human factors to improve Warfighter performance 6. Integrating biometric sensors and monitoring physiological data 7. Augmented reality technology and tactical operations “We have created a Symposium that will bring together a variety of stakeholders in order to build out two days of discussion and dialogue that spans a variety of disciplines involved in enhancing the capabilities and performance of our future Warfighters,” stated Monica Mckenzie, Senior Partner, Defense Strategies Institute. Several speakers include: *BG Brian Mennes, USA, Director, Joint and Integration, G-8, HQDA *COL Ed Barker, USA, PM Soldier Warrior, PEO Soldier *Dr. John Pazik, SES, Department Head, Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare and Combating Terrorism Department, ONR *COL James Miller, USA, Director Joint Acquisition Task Force (JATF) TALOS, USSOCOM *Col Brian L. Magnuson, USMC, Director, Expeditionary Energy Office, HQMC *Dr. Rajesh Naik, SES, Chief Scientist, 711th Human Performance Wing, Air Force Research Laboratory *Dr. Mike LaFiandra, Chief Scientist (A), Human Research and Engineering Directorate, ARL *COL Richard Malish, USA, Commander, U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory *Dr. Conor Walsh, BioDesign Lab, Harvard University *Mr. Cory Goetz, Power and Energy Directorate, CP&ID, CERDEC Seating is limited – In order to allow for actionable discussion and dialogue amongst speaker and attendees, seating will be limited. Register now to reserve your seat. Active military, government and State personnel attend complimentary. Anyone interested in participating in the Summit can go to Defense Strategies Institute's website at http://futurewarfighter.dsigroup.org for more information or contact Lisa Madison at lmadison@dsigroup.org 1-917-435-1266 Recognizing the great sacrifice that our men and women of the Armed Services have endured, DSI supports our Veteran’s and severely injured Service men and women and their families through our direct charitable donations. To learn more, please visit http://dsigroup.org/giving-back About DSI: Operating guidelines: In order to maintain our non-partisan stance, DSI receives no financial investment for operating costs from any outside organization, individual or group. Washington, DC, March 01, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Viewing the Warfighter as a “system of systems” the Symposium will cover topics such as:1. Advanced materials and fabrics to aide in clothing efficiencies2. Wearable robotics and advancements in human-machine integration3. Next-gen research in personal protective equipment / exoskeletons: malleable fabric exosuits, and "liquid armour" and buoyant body armor4. Energy and Power for the dismounted Soldier: energy harvesting capabilities, improved battery power (supplying, harnessing and generating power)5. Research and technologies in human factors to improve Warfighter performance6. Integrating biometric sensors and monitoring physiological data7. Augmented reality technology and tactical operations“We have created a Symposium that will bring together a variety of stakeholders in order to build out two days of discussion and dialogue that spans a variety of disciplines involved in enhancing the capabilities and performance of our future Warfighters,” stated Monica Mckenzie, Senior Partner, Defense Strategies Institute.Several speakers include:*BG Brian Mennes, USA, Director, Joint and Integration, G-8, HQDA*COL Ed Barker, USA, PM Soldier Warrior, PEO Soldier*Dr. John Pazik, SES, Department Head, Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare and Combating Terrorism Department, ONR*COL James Miller, USA, Director Joint Acquisition Task Force (JATF) TALOS, USSOCOM*Col Brian L. Magnuson, USMC, Director, Expeditionary Energy Office, HQMC*Dr. Rajesh Naik, SES, Chief Scientist, 711th Human Performance Wing, Air Force Research Laboratory*Dr. Mike LaFiandra, Chief Scientist (A), Human Research and Engineering Directorate, ARL*COL Richard Malish, USA, Commander, U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory*Dr. Conor Walsh, BioDesign Lab, Harvard University*Mr. Cory Goetz, Power and Energy Directorate, CP&ID, CERDECSeating is limited –In order to allow for actionable discussion and dialogue amongst speaker and attendees, seating will be limited. Register now to reserve your seat. Active military, government and State personnel attend complimentary.Anyone interested in participating in the Summit can go to Defense Strategies Institute's website at http://futurewarfighter.dsigroup.org for more information or contact Lisa Madison at lmadison@dsigroup.org 1-917-435-1266Recognizing the great sacrifice that our men and women of the Armed Services have endured, DSI supports our Veteran’s and severely injured Service men and women and their families through our direct charitable donations. To learn more, please visit http://dsigroup.org/giving-backAbout DSI:Operating guidelines: In order to maintain our non-partisan stance, DSI receives no financial investment for operating costs from any outside organization, individual or group.


ARLINGTON, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--CACI International Inc (NYSE: CACI) announced today that it was awarded a $31 million contract to support modeling and simulation technology for the U.S. Army Research, Development, and Engineering Command’s (RDECOM) Communications-Electronics Research, Development, and Engineering Center (CERDEC) Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD). This three-year task order, awarded under the R2-3G contract vehicle, represents new business in CACI’s Surveillance and Reconnaissance market area. CERDEC NVESD conducts research and development of advanced night vision and other sensor technologies, such as infrared weapon sights, and long-range surveillance and target acquisition systems, which enhance our Armed Forces’ operational advantage in daytime, nighttime, and limited visibility conditions. Under this contract, CACI will support the development of realistic electro-optic/infrared and SIGINT payload modeling and simulation capabilities and training systems. These training systems will enhance the readiness of the Army’s Airborne Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (A-ISR) tactical units, resulting in improved situational awareness to Army brigade combat teams. The company will also provide pilots and trainers to develop and execute A-ISR programs of instruction. John Mengucci, CACI’s Chief Operating Officer and President of U.S. Operations, said, “As a pioneer in modeling and simulation technology, CACI will leverage our extensive subject matter expertise and knowledge of this customer’s mission applications to develop highly realistic simulations in support of Army airborne intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance operations.” According to CACI President and Chief Executive Officer Ken Asbury, “With this award for new work, CACI is proud to expand our ongoing partnership with the U.S. Army’s Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate. It continues CACI’s commitment to providing our government customers with the tools and resources to gather actionable intelligence for military decision-makers.” CACI provides information solutions and services in support of national security missions and government transformation for Intelligence, Defense, and Federal Civilian customers. A Fortune magazine World’s Most Admired Company in the IT Services industry, CACI is a member of the Fortune 1000 Largest Companies, the Russell 2000 Index, and the S&P SmallCap600 Index. CACI’s sustained commitment to ethics and integrity defines its corporate culture and drives its success. With approximately 20,000 employees worldwide, CACI provides dynamic career opportunities for military veterans and industry professionals to support the nation’s most critical missions. Join us! www.caci.com. There are statements made herein which do not address historical facts, and therefore could be interpreted to be forward-looking statements as that term is defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements are subject to factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from anticipated results. The factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those anticipated include, but are not limited to, the risk factors set forth in CACI’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2016, and other such filings that CACI makes with the Securities and Exchange Commission from time to time. Any forward-looking statements should not be unduly relied upon and only speak as of the date hereof.


Perera R.D.W.,CERDEC | Anand S.,Stevens Institute of Technology | Subbalakshmi K.P.,Stevens Institute of Technology | Chandramouli R.,Stevens Institute of Technology
Proceedings - IEEE Military Communications Conference MILCOM | Year: 2010

We study the temporal behavior of messages arriving in a social network. We specifically study the tweets and re-tweets sent to president Barack Obama on Twitter. We characterize the inter-arrival times between the tweets, the number of re-tweets and the spatial coordinates (latitude, longitude) of the users who sent the tweets. The modeling of the arrival process of tweets in Twitter can be applied to predict co-ordinated user behavior in social networks. While there is sufficient literature on social networks that present large volumes of collected data, the modeling and characterization of the data have been rarely discussed. The available data are usually very expensive and not comprehensive. Here, we develop a software architecture that uses a Twitter application program interface (API) to collect the tweets sent to specific users. We then extract the user ids and the exact time-stamps of the tweets. We use the collected data to characterize the inter-arrival times between tweets and the number of re-tweets. Our studies indicate that the arrival process of new tweets to a user can be modeled as a Poisson Process while the number of re-tweets follow a geometric distribution. Our data collection architecture is operating system (OS) independent. The results obtained in this research can be applied to study correlations between patterns of user behavior and their locations. ©2010 IEEE.


Xiao Z.,University of Maryland University College | Goldsman N.,University of Maryland University College | Dhar N.K.,CERDEC
International Conference on Simulation of Semiconductor Processes and Devices, SISPAD | Year: 2015

Germanium can be transformed from an indirect bandgap material to a direct bandgap material by applying strain. Unstrained Ge has an indirect bandgap of 0.66eV (at L point) and a direct bandgap of 0.8eV [1]. When strain is applied, the band structure of germanium will be altered. When the strain is tensile, both the indirect and the direct bandgaps tend to decrease. Under certain strains, the direct bandgap will be pushed even below the indirect bandgap, at which point, germanium becomes a direct bandgap material. The value of the bandgap when Ge transforms from an indirect to direct semiconductor upon the application of strain is named the Bandgap Transition Point (BTP), and the required strain is named STP (Strain at Transition Point). Previous research has been done on uniaxial and biaxial strained germanium on the conventional orientations. In this work, calculations are made on the effect of applying tensile stress in arbitrary orientations based on nonlocal empirical pseudopotential method (EPM) [2] [3]. We also use cubic spline interpolation of the atomic form factors [4] [5], as well as the rules for strain translation [6], to determine how the Indirect-Direct transformation phenomenon of germanium changes with respect to virtually any orientation of the crystal planes. In addition, we calculated the optimal orientation and the effect that departure from this optimal orientation has on the bandgap. © 2015 IEEE.


Huang G.C.,University of Hawaii at Manoa | Iskander M.F.,University of Hawaii at Manoa | Hoque M.,CERDEC | Goodall S.R.,CERDEC | Bocskor T.,CERDEC
IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters | Year: 2015

To help with long range coverage, minimal interference, and reduced energy requirements, recent studies have incorporated directional antenna arrays in wireless communication networks. In this letter, a broadband, dual polarization, and very narrow beam (< 11°) antenna array system based on the Long Slot Antenna (LSA) array technology has been developed, prototyped and tested. The complex feeding structure of the antenna array was simplified with a novel aperture metallic patch design using 50 - 60Ω microstrip lines. HFSS simulation and experimental beamwidth results are in excellent agreement (< 1° difference). © 2015 IEEE.

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