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Ramirez-Bosca A.,Centro Dermatologico Estetico Of Alicante | Zapater P.,University Miguel Hernandez | Betlloch I.,Hospital General Universitario Of Alicante | Albero F.,Servicio de Dermatologia | And 3 more authors.
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas | Year: 2012

Introduction: Topical corticosteroids are used to treat inflammation and relieve itching in atopic dermatitis, but their use is limited by adverse reactions. Objectives: The main aim of this study was to investigate whether daily treatment with Polypodium leucotomos extract would reduce the use of topical corticosteroids in children and adolescents with atopic dermatitis. We also analyzed oral antihistamine use and changes in disease severity. Patients and methods: We performed a phase IV randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial involving 105 patients aged between 2 and 17 years who were receiving topical corticosteroids to treat moderate atopic dermatitis. The patients were randomized to receive, in addition to their standard treatment, Polypodium leucotomos extract or placebo (both in capsule form) for 6 months. The percentage of days on which topical corticosteroids and other atopic dermatitis treatments were used was calculated. Results: Use of Polypodium leucotomos extract did not significantly reduce the mean (SD) percentage of days on which topical corticosteroids were used (11% [12%] vs 12% [11%] for placebo). A significant reduction was, however, observed for oral histamine use (median percentage of days, 4.5% in the Polypodium leucotomos group and 13.6% in the placebo group [P = .038]). The percentage of patients who used oral antihistamines was also lower in the Polypodium leucotomos group. Conclusion: Long-term treatment with Polypodium leucotomos extract has benefits for children and adolescents with atopic dermatitis who require pharmacologic treatment to reduce inflammation and relieve itching. *Dermatitis atópica*extracto de Polypodium leucotomos*Corticosteroides tópicos*Antihistamínicos. © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. y AEDV. Todos los derechos reservados. Source


Navarro M.R.,Centro Dermatologico Estetico Of Alicante | Asin M.,Centro Dermatologico Estetico Of Alicante | Martinez A.M.,Centro Dermatologico Estetico Of Alicante | Molina C.,Centro Dermatologico Estetico Of Alicante | And 4 more authors.
European Journal of Plastic Surgery | Year: 2015

Background: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is a common hair disorder that affects both men and women all over the world. Although it is far from being a life-threatening disease, the psychosocial impact of AGA can provoke stress and a significant decrease in life quality. The objective of this retrospective study is to investigate the safety and efficacy of autologous plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) for the treatment of AGA. Methods: One hundred patients were included in this study. They followed two intradermal cycles of PRGF every 4 weeks. Macrophotographs and trichograms were performed at baseline and at 4 months after the first treatment in order to evaluate the overall improvement and determine the anagen/telogen hair ratio, respectively. Results: Patients showed an overall increase in hair density. Trichogram analysis showed that anagen hair follicles increased significantly at 6.2 percentage points (p < 0.05) comparing to baseline levels, while a decrease of 5.1 points (p < 0.05) was observed among telogen ones. No adverse effect was reported by any patient. Conclusions: Although more randomized clinical studies are needed, our data suggest that PRGF has a positive therapeutic effect on androgenetic alopecia showing no adverse effects related to the treatment protocol. Level of Evidence: Level III, therapeutic study. © 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source


Navarro M.R.,Centro Dermatologico Estetico Of Alicante | Asin M.,Centro Dermatologico Estetico Of Alicante | Martinez M.A.,Centro Dermatologico Estetico Of Alicante | Martinez A.M.,Centro Dermatologico Estetico Of Alicante | And 7 more authors.
European Journal of Plastic Surgery | Year: 2016

Background: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is a common hair disorder. Finasteride and minoxidil have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of AGA. However, some side effects have been related to the intake of these drugs. Recently, plasma rich in growth factors has emerged as a safe alternative for the management of pattern hair loss. The purposes of the present study are to evaluate and compare the efficacy and safety of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGFs) versus topical minoxidil treatment in AGA-affected patients. Methods: Following a retrospective case control design, 379 patients treated with either PRGF or minoxidil were included in this study. Diagnostic trichograms at baseline and 4 months after treatment were performed with the aim of analyzing the anagen/telogen hair change improvement. Results: PRGF-treated patients showed higher anagen hair increase improvement compared to minoxidil-treated ones (6.9 ± 0.4 and 4.6 ± 0.5 %, respectively) (p < 0.05). Telogen hair decrease improvement was also higher in PRGF group (5.7 ± 0.3 and 2.6 ± 0.5 %, respectively) (p < 0.05). Global photographs showed an overall volume and quality hair improvement for both treatments. No adverse effects were reported. Conclusions: This retrospective study shows that PRGF is a safe and effective treatment for AGA and evidences that PRGF exerts improved anagen/telogen results than topical minoxidil. Level of evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg Source


Navarro-Belmonte M.R.,Centro Dermatologico Estetico Of Alicante | Navarro-Lopez V.,Centro Dermatologico Estetico Of Alicante | Ramirez-Bosca A.,Centro Dermatologico Estetico Of Alicante | Martinez-Andres M.A.,Centro Dermatologico Estetico Of Alicante | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology | Year: 2015

Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is a distinctive form of scarring alopecia presenting with partial eyebrow loss and frontal temporal parietal recession of the hairline. Its etiology remains unknown, and there is no definitive treatment. Information in familial cases of FFA is scarce. We conducted a retrospective cohort study describing the mean clinical findings, treatment, and also the mean differences between premenopausal and postmenopausal cases of familiar FFA. Data analysis from case was performed on eight patients with a familiar history and diagnosis of FFA seen at the Alicante Aesthetic Dermatology Centre between January 2009 and June 2014. All patients in this cohort were females. Mean age at onset was 65 year (range 60-75) in the postmenopausal patients and 39 year (range 33-47) in the premenopausal women. All menopausal patients were in an advanced stage when the disease had already developed in the frontal and/or temporal parietal hairline region. However, the daughters, all of them premenopausal age, attended the consultation with mild involvement of the eyebrows in all four cases and mild impairment of the frontal hairline in three of them. Specific clinical findings in familial FFA are poorly communicated until nowadays although the number of familial cases arises until 8% in the main case series published in recent years. Early diagnosis in premenopausal stage is frequent in our case series and allows us to begin the protocol treatment in the first stage of the disease, but long-term progression will remain uncertain until a definitive treatment could be established by multicenter randomized controlled trials. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source

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