Centro Cultural Sergio Motta

São Raimundo Nonato, Brazil

Centro Cultural Sergio Motta

São Raimundo Nonato, Brazil

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The results of the study on spatial arrangement, the analysis of marks and the preservation conditions of the giant ground sloth (Eremotherium) remains found in the Lagoa Uri de Cima (Salgueiro, Pernambuco, Brazil), a temporary shallow lake, are presented here. The skeletal elements of the same individual, an adult, found in a restricted area (about 8 m in diameter) and its taphonomic patterns suggest that the animal arrived in the shallow lake as a carcass, and its bones were subsequently spread apart and broken mainly by trampling by other large animals. This taphonomic model also applies to some other Eremotherium individuals found into the "lagoa", but not to all. That means that the sequence of processes affecting the formation of this kind of fossil deposit is generally relatively complex. © 2016 by the Sociedade Brasileira de Paleontologia.


Raghavan M.,Copenhagen University | Steinrucken M.,University of California at Berkeley | Steinrucken M.,University of Massachusetts Amherst | Harris K.,University of California at Berkeley | And 116 more authors.
Science | Year: 2015

How and when the Americas were populated remains contentious. Using ancient and modern genome-wide data, we found that the ancestors of all present-day Native Americans, including Athabascans and Amerindians, entered the Americas as a single migration wave from Siberia no earlier than 23 thousand years ago (ka) and after no more than an 8000-year isolation period in Beringia. After their arrival to the Americas, ancestral Native Americans diversified into two basal genetic branches around 13 ka, one that is now dispersed across North and South America and the other restricted to North America. Subsequent gene flow resulted in some Native Americans sharing ancestry with present-day East Asians (including Siberians) and, more distantly, Australo-Melanesians. Putative "Paleoamerican" relict populations, including the historical Mexican Pericúes and South American Fuego-Patagonians, are not directly related to modern Australo-Melanesians as suggested by the Paleoamerican Model. © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Centro Cultural Sergio Motta, Federal University of Pernambuco, University of Sao Paulo and Brazilian Nuclear Energy Research Institute (IPEN)
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciencias | Year: 2016

This work reports the dating of a fossil human tooth and shell found at the archaeological site Toca do Enoque located in Serra das Confuses National Park (Piau, Brazil). Many prehistoric paintings have been found at this site. An archaeological excavation unearthed three sepulchers with human skeletons and some shells. Two Brazilian laboratories, in Ribeiro Preto (USP) and Recife (UFPE), independently performed Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) measurements to date the tooth and the shell and obtain the equivalent dose received by each sample. The laboratories determined similar ages for the tooth and the shell (~4.8 kyBP). The results agreed with C-14 dating of the shell and other samples (charcoal) collected in the same sepulcher. Therefore, this work provides a valid inter-comparison of results by two independent ESR-dating laboratories and between two dating methods; i.e., C-14 and ESR, showing the validity of ESR dating for this range of ages.


Kinoshita A.,University of Sao Paulo | Kinoshita A.,Sacred Heart University of Brazil | Skinner A.R.,Williams College | Guidon N.,Centro Cultural Sergio Motta | And 11 more authors.
Journal of Human Evolution | Year: 2014

Excavation of Toca do Serrote das Moendas, in Piauí state, Brazil revealed a great quantity of fossil wild fauna associated with human remains. In particular, fossils of a cervid (. Blastocerus dichotomus) were found, an animal frequently pictured in ancient rock wall paintings. In a well-defined stratum, two loose teeth of this species were found in close proximity to human bones. The teeth were independently dated by electron spin resonance (ESR) in two laboratories. The ages obtained for the teeth were 29±3ka (thousands of years) and 24±1ka. The concretion layer capping this stratum was dated by optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of the quartz grains to 21±3ka. As these values were derived independently in three different laboratories, using different methods and equipment, these results are compelling evidence of early habitation in this area. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Williams College, Sacred Heart University of Brazil, Universidade São Francisco, Centro Cultural Sergio Motta and 5 more.
Type: | Journal: Journal of human evolution | Year: 2014

Excavation of Toca do Serrote das Moendas, in Piau state, Brazil revealed a great quantity of fossil wild fauna associated with human remains. In particular, fossils of a cervid (Blastocerus dichotomus) were found, an animal frequently pictured in ancient rock wall paintings. In a well-defined stratum, two loose teeth of this species were found in close proximity to human bones. The teeth were independently dated by electron spin resonance (ESR) in two laboratories. The ages obtained for the teeth were 29 3 ka (thousands of years) and 24 1 ka. The concretion layer capping this stratum was dated by optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of the quartz grains to 21 3 ka. As these values were derived independently in three different laboratories, using different methods and equipment, these results are compelling evidence of early habitation in this area.

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