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Leonel S.,Sao Paulo State University | Tecchio M.A.,Centro Avancado Of Pesquisa Tecnologica Do Agronegocio Of Frutas
Revista Brasileira de Fruticultura | Year: 2011

The work evaluated the yield, fruiting time and harvest period of the peach and nectarine cultivars, with and without hydrogen cyanamide, in two crop cycles (2009 and 2010). The experiment was carried out in the School of Agronomical Sciences (FCA), São Paulo State University (UNESP), Botucatu Campus, SP, Brazil, located at 22o 51' 55" S, 48o 27' 22" W and 810m altitude. The predominant climate in the study region is described as a warm temperate climate (mesothermal), with rainy summer and dry winter. The spraying with hydrogen cyanamide and mineral oil showed in the earlier harvest dates for all cultivars evaluated. Also, there was one concentration on the yield period, decrease on the crop cycle and increase the yield productivity. The evaluation of the pruning until harvest time with free blooming showed that the earliest cultivars were: Precocinho (81.5 days) and Conserva 693 (87 days). The latest were: Turmalina (141.5 days) and CP 951 C (120 days). With the spraying with hydrogen cyanamide and mineral oil the pruning until harvest time showed the earliest cultivars: Precocinho (87.5 days) and Sun Blaze nectarine (95.5 days). The latest were: Diamante Mejorado (126.5 days) and CP 951 C (120 days). The highest yield were observed in the Turmalina (20.2 kg plant-1), Conserva 693 (20.75 kg plant-1) and Aurora 1 (15.65 kg plant-1) cultivars. Source


Leonel S.,Sao Paulo State University | de Souza M.E.,Sao Paulo State University | Tecchio M.A.,Centro Avancado Of Pesquisa Tecnologica Do Agronegocio Of Frutas | Segantini D.M.,Sao Paulo State University
Revista Brasileira de Fruticultura | Year: 2011

The study evaluated the leaf nutritional levels of peach and nectarine trees under subtropical climate in order to improve the fertilization practices. The experiment was carried out in São Paulo state University, Botucatu, São Paulo State, Brazil. The experimental design consisted of subdivided plots, in which plots corresponded to cultivars and subplots to the leaf sample periods. The evaluated peach cultivars were: Marli, Turmalina, Precocinho, Jubileu, Cascata 968, Cascata 848, CP 951C, CP 9553CYN, and Tropic Beauty, and that of nectarine was 'Sun Blaze'. The sample periods were: after harvest, plants in vegetative period; dormancy; beginning of flowering and fruiting (standard sample). Results indicated significant variations in the levels of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, B, Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn for the sampling period and in N, Ca, Mg, S, B, Fe and Mn levels for the cultivars. Source


Macedo W.R.,Instituto Agronomico IAC | Terra M.M.,IAC | Tecchio M.A.,Centro Avancado Of Pesquisa Tecnologica Do Agronegocio Of Frutas | Pires E.J.P.,IAC | And 3 more authors.
Ciencia Rural | Year: 2010

The objective of present research was to evaluate the effects of increasing doses of forchlorfenuron associated, or not, to gibberellic acid on physical and chemical components of the 'Centennial Seedless' grapes. The treatments were gibberellic acid (GA3) (0 and 5mg L-1) associated with forchlorfenuron (0, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10mg L-1). The variables were mass, width and length of bunches, berries and rachis, total soluble solids, pH, acidity and total ratio soluble solids/ titratable acidity (SS/TA). The experiment was conducted in a vineyard located in the municipality of São Miguel Arcanjo, southwest of São Paulo State, and the regulators were applied at 15 days after full bloom by spraying the bunch. The interaction of the estimated dose of 5mg L-1 forchlorfenuron associated with GA3, provided increases on the mass and width of the berries, and the estimated doses of 4 and 6.5mg L-1 of forchlorfenuron associated with GA3, showed the lowest soluble solids and ratio SS/TA, respectively. The treatment with GA3 resulted in gains in the diameter of the pedicels, mass of bunches, berries and rachis, and increasing the length and width of berries. Source

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