Centro Andaluz Of Nanomedicina Y Biotecnologia Campanillas

Málaga, Spain

Centro Andaluz Of Nanomedicina Y Biotecnologia Campanillas

Málaga, Spain
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Canovas S.,Centro Andaluz Of Nanomedicina Y Biotecnologia Campanillas | Canovas S.,University of Murcia | Ross P.J.,University of California at Davis
Theriogenology | Year: 2016

Fertilization is a very dynamic period of comprehensive chromatin remodeling, from which two specialized cells result in a totipotent zygote. The formation of a totipotent cell requires extensive epigenetic remodeling that, although independent of modifications in the DNA sequence, still entails a profound cell-fate change, supported by transcriptional profile modifications. As a result of finely tuned interactions between numerous mechanisms, the goal of fertilization is to form a full healthy new individual. To avoid the persistence of alterations in epigenetic marks, the epigenetic information contained in each gamete is reset during early embryogenesis. Covalent modification of DNA by methylation, as well as posttranslational modifications of histone proteins and noncoding RNAs, appears to be the main epigenetic mechanisms that control gene expression. These allow different cells in an organism to express different transcription profiles, despite each cell containing the same DNA sequence. In the context of replacement of spermatic protamine with histones from the oocyte, active cell division, and specification of different lineages, active and passive mechanisms of epigenetic remodeling have been revealed as critical for editing the epigenetic profile of the early embryo. Importantly, redundant factors and mechanisms are likely in place, and only a few have been reported as critical for fertilization or embryo survival by the use of knockout models. The aim of this review is to highlight the main mechanisms of epigenetic remodeling that ensue after fertilization in mammals. © 2016 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Centro Andaluz Of Nanomedicina Y Biotecnologia Campanillas and University of California at Davis
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Theriogenology | Year: 2016

Fertilization is a very dynamic period of comprehensive chromatin remodeling, from which two specialized cells result in a totipotent zygote. The formation of a totipotent cell requires extensive epigenetic remodeling that, although independent of modifications in the DNA sequence, still entails a profound cell-fate change, supported by transcriptional profile modifications. As a result of finely tuned interactions between numerous mechanisms, the goal of fertilization is to form a full healthy new individual. To avoid the persistence of alterations in epigenetic marks, the epigenetic information contained in each gamete is reset during early embryogenesis. Covalent modification of DNA by methylation, as well as posttranslational modifications of histone proteins and noncoding RNAs, appears to be the main epigenetic mechanisms that control gene expression. These allow different cells in an organism to express different transcription profiles, despite each cell containing the same DNA sequence. In the context of replacement of spermatic protamine with histones from the oocyte, active cell division, and specification of different lineages, active and passive mechanisms of epigenetic remodeling have been revealed as critical for editing the epigenetic profile of the early embryo. Importantly, redundant factors and mechanisms are likely in place, and only a few have been reported as critical for fertilization or embryo survival by the use of knockout models. The aim of this review is to highlight the main mechanisms of epigenetic remodeling that ensue after fertilization in mammals.


PubMed | Centro Andaluz Of Nanomedicina Y Biotecnologia Campanillas and University of California at Davis
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Reproduction, fertility, and development | Year: 2016

Epigenetics involves mechanisms independent of modifications in the DNA sequence that result in changes in gene expression and are maintained through cell divisions. Because all cells in the organism contain the same genetic blueprint, epigenetics allows for cells to assume different phenotypes and maintain them upon cell replication. As such, during the life cycle, there are moments in which the epigenetic information needs to be reset for the initiation of a new organism. In mammals, the resetting of epigenetic marks occurs at two different moments, which both happen to be during gestation, and include primordial germ cells (PGCs) and early preimplantation embryos. Because epigenetic information is reversible and sensitive to environmental changes, it is probably no coincidence that both these extensive periods of epigenetic remodelling happen in the female reproductive tract, under a finely controlled maternal environment. It is becoming evident that perturbations during the extensive epigenetic remodelling in PGCs and embryos can lead to permanent and inheritable changes to the epigenome that can result in long-term changes to the offspring derived from them, as indicated by the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypothesis and recent demonstration of inter- and trans-generational epigenetic alterations. In this context, an understanding of the mechanisms of epigenetic remodelling during early embryo development is important to assess the potential for gametic epigenetic mutations to contribute to the offspring and for new epimutations to be established during embryo manipulations that could affect a large number of cells in the offspring. It is of particular interest to understand whether and how epigenetic information can be passed on from the gametes to the embryo or offspring, and whether abnormalities in this process could lead to transgenerationally inheritable phenotypes. The aim of this review is to highlight recent progress made in understanding the nature and mechanisms of epigenetic remodelling that ensue after fertilisation.

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