Centro Alzheimer

San Donato di Ninea, Italy

Centro Alzheimer

San Donato di Ninea, Italy
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Morganti F.,University of Bergamo | Stefanini S.,Centro Alzheimer | Riva G.,University of Milan | Riva G.,Instituto Auxologico Italiano IRCCS
Cognitive Neuroscience | Year: 2013

The ability to orient in space constitutes a main sign of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Presently, a peculiar aspect of topographical disorientation in AD linked with spatial reference frame congruence appears to have been only minimally investigated. We aim to study whether there is a decline in performing the allo- to egocentric translation of spatial knowledge during different types of wayfinding in AD patients. We introduced two virtual reality tasks, the VR-Maze and VR-Road Map tasks, in which we compared 26 AD and 26 healthy, elderly subjects. The results emphasize that there is a specific reduction in performing allo- to egocentric spatial tasks in AD, whereas this reduction is not as evident in equivalent allocentric spatial tasks. The data are consistent with the neurological results regarding the early degeneration of the hippocampus and retrosplenial cortex in AD, which underlies the ability to translate between these two reference frames. © 2013 Taylor & Francis.


Congedo M.,ASS N. 4 Medio Friuli | Causarano R.I.,Hospice Il Tulipano | Alberti F.,U.O. Neurologia Ospedale di Sanremo IM | Bonito V.,Neurologia | And 11 more authors.
European Journal of Neurology | Year: 2010

Dementia is a terminal disease, associated with great suffering and difficult decisions in the severe stage. The decision-making process is characterized by uncertainty because of lack of scientific evidence in treatments and by the need to reconcile conflicting points of view. In intercurrent diseases, aggressive interventions are used without consideration of its futility; in comparison with cancer, several consequences of physicians' attitude not to consider dementia as a terminal disease have been reported, especially concerning pain relief. Lack of evidence of artificial nutrition and hydration effectiveness makes advance care planning relevant. © 2010 EFNS.


Tiraboschi P.,Centro Alzheimer | Tiraboschi P.,NeuroLogica | Chit E.,Centro Alzheimer | Sacco L.,Neurocentre of Southern Switzerland | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Alzheimer's Disease | Year: 2011

Voting by persons with dementia raises questions about their decision-making capacity. Methods specifically addressing voting capacity of demented people have been proposed in the US, but never tested elsewhere. We translated and adapted the US Competence Assessment Tool for Voting (CAT-V) to the Italian context, using it before 2006 elections for Prime Minister. Consisting of a brief questionnaire, this tool evaluates the following decision-making abilities: understanding nature and effect of voting, expressing a choice, and reasoning about voting choices. Subjects performance was examined in relation to dementia severity. Of 38 subjects with Alzheimers disease (AD) enrolled in the study, only three scored the maximum on all CAT-V items. MMSE and CAT-V scores correlated only moderately (r = 0.59; P < 0.0001) with one another, reflecting the variability of subjects performance at any disease stage. Most participants (90%), although performing poorly on understanding and reasoning items, scored the maximum on the choice measure. Our results imply that voting capacity in AD is only roughly predicted by MMSE scores and may more accurately be measured by a structured questionnaire, such as the CAT-V. Among the decision-making abilities evaluated by the CAT-V, expressing a choice was by far the least affected by the dementing process. Copyright © 2011 Pietro Tiraboschi et al.


Tarquini D.,UOC Neurologia | Pucci E.,UOC Neurologia AV3 ASUR Marche | Gasparini M.,Ambulatorio di Neurologia | Zullo S.,University of Bologna | And 3 more authors.
Recenti Progressi in Medicina | Year: 2014

In 2011, the so-called Dubois criteria introduced the use of biomarkers in research (in particular, brain amyloid positron emission tomography imaging and the cerebrospinal fluid levels of tau/fosfo-tau and beta-amyloid 1-42) for the early or preclinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Even so, we are looking at an increased use of these markers in clinical practice. In the 1960s, Alzheimer's disease was considered a rare form of presenile dementia, but gradually it has been recognized as the prevalent form of old-age dementia. As a consequence, what was once regarded as an inevitable outcome of old age is now recognized as a true disease. Several factors contributed to this paradigm shift, in particular a longer lifespan, new techniques of in vivo study of the central nervous system, and the pressure exerted by the pharmaceutical industry and patient groups. The current lack of disease-modifying therapies and the high incidence of mild cognitive impairment, which is a risk factor for dementia, raise a series of clinical ethical problems ranging from how diagnosis is communicated to how resources are used. This article offers a conceptual scheme through which these issues can be addressed. Copyright - Il Pensiero Scientifico Editore.


PubMed | Centro Alzheimer
Type: | Journal: International journal of Alzheimer's disease | Year: 2011

Voting by persons with dementia raises questions about their decision-making capacity. Methods specifically addressing voting capacity of demented people have been proposed in the US, but never tested elsewhere. We translated and adapted the US Competence Assessment Tool for Voting (CAT-V) to the Italian context, using it before 2006 elections for Prime Minister. Consisting of a brief questionnaire, this tool evaluates the following decision-making abilities: understanding nature and effect of voting, expressing a choice, and reasoning about voting choices. Subjects performance was examined in relation to dementia severity. Of 38 subjects with Alzheimers disease (AD) enrolled in the study, only three scored the maximum on all CAT-V items. MMSE and CAT-V scores correlated only moderately (r = 0.59; P < 0.0001) with one another, reflecting the variability of subjects performance at any disease stage. Most participants (90%), although performing poorly on understanding and reasoning items, scored the maximum on the choice measure. Our results imply that voting capacity in AD is only roughly predicted by MMSE scores and may more accurately be measured by a structured questionnaire, such as the CAT-V. Among the decision-making abilities evaluated by the CAT-V, expressing a choice was by far the least affected by the dementing process.

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