Changsha, China

Central South University

www.csu.edu.cn/
Changsha, China

Central South University located in Changsha, a historic and cultural city in Hunan province, central south of the People's Republic of China. CSU was established in April 2000 on the basis of the amalgamation of the three former individual universities, namely Central South University of Mining and Technology , Hunan Medical University and Changsha Railway University . Wikipedia.

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News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

New York, NY, May 5, 2017 - An international group of experts has concluded that, for patients with schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, antipsychotic medications do not have negative long-term effects on patients' outcomes or the brain. In addition, the benefits of these medications are much greater than their potential side effects. These findings, by Jeffrey Lieberman, MD, Lawrence C. Kolb Professor and Chairman of Psychiatry at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeon and Director of the New York State Psychiatric Institute, and colleagues from institutions in the United States, Germany, The Netherlands, Austria, Japan, and China, were published today in the American Journal of Psychiatry. Nearly seven million Americans take antipsychotic medications for the treatment of schizophrenia and related conditions. The medications are prescribed to alleviate the symptoms of psychosis and longer-term, to prevent relapse. In recent years, however, concerns have been raised that these medications could have toxic effects and negatively impact long-term outcomes. This view, if not justified by data, has the potential mislead some patients (and their families) to refuse or discontinue antipsychotic treatment. For this reason, the researchers undertook a comprehensive examination of clinical and basic research studies that examined the effects of antipsychotic drug treatment on the clinical outcomes of patients and changes in brain structure. "The evidence from randomized clinical trials and neuroimaging studies overwhelmingly suggests that the majority of patients with schizophrenia benefit from antipsychotic treatment, both in the initial presentation of the disease and for longer-term maintenance to prevent relapse," said Dr. Lieberman. Moreover, whatever side effects that these medications might cause are greatly outweighed by their therapeutic benefits. "Anyone who doubts this conclusion should talk with people whose symptoms have been relieved by treatment and literally given back their lives," Lieberman added. The studies also revealed that delaying or withholding treatment has been associated with poorer long-term outcomes. "While a minority of patients who recover from an initial psychotic episode may maintain their remission without antipsychotic treatment, there is currently no clinical biomarker to identify them, and it is a very small number of patients who may fall into this subgroup," said Dr. Lieberman. "Consequently, withholding treatment could be detrimental for most patients with schizophrenia." And while preclinical studies in rodents suggested that antipsychotic medications can sensitize dopamine receptors, there is no evidence that antipsychotic treatment increases the risk of relapse. While antipsychotic medications can increase the risk for metabolic syndrome, which is linked to heart disease, diabetes, and stroke, the study did not include a risk-benefit analysis. "While more research is needed to address these questions, the strong evidence supporting the benefits of antipsychotic medications should be made clear to patients and their families, while at the same time they should be used judiciously" said Dr. Lieberman. The paper is entitled, "The Long-Term Effects of Antipsychotic Medication on Clinical Course in Schizophrenia." The authors are Donald Goff, MD (New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY), Peter Falkai, MD, PhD (Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Germany), Wolfgang Fleischhacker, MD, (Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria), Ragy Girgis, MD (Columbia University Medical Center), Rene M. Kahn, MD, PhD (University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands;), Hiroyuki Uchida, MD, PhD (Keiyo University, Tokyo, Japan), Jingping Zhao, MD, Ph.D. (Central South University, Chengsha, China), and Jeffrey Lieberman, MD (Columbia University Medical Center and New York State Psychiatric Institute). Dr. Goff has received research support from Avanir Pharmaceuticals, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the Stanley Medical Research Institute. Dr. Fleischhacker has received research support from Boehringer-Ingelheim, Janssen, Lundbeck, and Otsuka; he has received honoraria for serving as a consultant to and/or on advisory boards for Allergan, Dainippon-Sumitomo, GedeonRichter, Janssen, Lundbeck, Otsuka, Takeda, and Teva; and he has received speaker's fees and travel support from AOP Orphan, Dainippon Sumitomo, Gedeon Richter, Janssen, Lundbeck, Pfizer, Otsuka, and Teva. Dr. Girgis receives research support from Allergan, BioAdvantex, Genentech, and Otsuka. Dr. Kahn has received consulting fees from Alkermes, Forrest, Forum, Gedeon-Richter, Janssen-Cilag, Minerva Neurosciences, and Sunovion and speaker's fees from Janssen-Cilag and Lilly. Dr. Uchida has received grants from Astellas Pharmaceutical, Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma, Eisai, Eli Lilly, Meiji-Seika Pharmaceutical, Mochida Pharmaceutical, Novartis, Otsuka Pharmaceutical, and Shionogi; speaker's honoraria from Dainippon-Sumitomo Pharma, Eli Lilly, Janssen Pharmaceutical, Meiji-Seika Pharma, MSD, Otsuka Pharmaceutical, Pfizer, Shionogi, and Yoshitomi Yakuhin; and advisory panel payments from Dainippon-Sumitomo Pharma. All other authors report no financial relationships with commercial interests. New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University Department of Psychiatry (NYSPI/Columbia Psychiatry). New York State Psychiatric Institute (founded in 1896) and the Columbia University Department of Psychiatry have been closely affiliated since 1925. Their co-location in a New York State facility on the New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center campus provides the setting for a rich and productive collaborative relationship among scientists and physicians in a variety of disciplines. NYSPI/Columbia Psychiatry is ranked among the best departments and psychiatric research facilities in the nation and has contributed greatly to the understanding of and current treatment for psychiatric disorders. The Department and Institute are home to distinguished clinicians and researchers noted for their clinical and research advances in the diagnosis and treatment of depression, suicide, schizophrenia, bipolar and anxiety disorders and childhood psychiatric disorders. Their combined expertise provides state of the art clinical care for patients, and training for the next generation of psychiatrists and psychiatric researchers. Columbia University Medical Center provides international leadership in basic, preclinical, and clinical research; medical and health sciences education; and patient care. The medical center trains future leaders and includes the dedicated work of many physicians, scientists, public health professionals, dentists, and nurses at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, the Mailman School of Public Health, the College of Dental Medicine, the School of Nursing, the biomedical departments of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and allied research centers and institutions. Columbia University Medical Center is home to the largest medical research enterprise in New York City and State and one of the largest faculty medical practices in the Northeast. The campus that Columbia University Medical Center shares with its hospital partner, NewYork-Presbyterian, is now called the Columbia University Irving Medical Center. For more information, visit cumc.columbia.edu or columbiadoctors.org.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

On 17 April 2017, Chinese geneticists discovered that major mutations in vitamin D related genes are much more common in autism subjects than in controls: Li et al. Vitamin D-related genes are subjected to significant de novo mutation burdens in autism spectrum disorder. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics, April 17, 2017. Dr. Li and colleagues found multiple mutations of vitamin D related genes (VDRG), writing that this could be part of the genetic mechanism “underlying ASD pathogenesis.” A meta-analysis found vitamin D deficiency is much more common in autistic children than typically developing children, thought to be due to less sun exposure. But, low vitamin D levels in autistic individuals is lower at 3 months’ gestation, at birth and at age six, so sun exposure does not explain it. Also, two open label trials and a randomized controlled trial found that high dose vitamin D has a treatment effect in established autism. For details of these vitamin D and autism papers, contact Dr. Cannell below. Dr. Li and colleagues discovered that low vitamin D in autism is due to genetics, according to Dr. Li et al in the above paper. They found de novo mutations (a new mutation arising in the egg or sperm that were not present in the parents) were much more likely in vitamin D related genes. This may explain why autistic children have such low vitamin D levels and why vitamin D may help treat and/or prevent autism. It is important to understand that even if you inherit low vitamin D levels, sunshine or supplements may overcome the genetics. To contact the authors, contact: Dr. Zhong Sheng Sun Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing,China Email: sunzs(at)biols9dot)ac(dot)cn Kun Xia, the State Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Central South University, Changsha, China. Email: xiakun(at)sklmg.edu(dot)cn This press release was sponsored by: John Cannell MD Vitamin D Council 1411 Marsh Street, Ste 203 San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 jjcannell(at)vitaminDcouncil(dot)org 805 439-1075


Patent
Central South University | Date: 2017-07-26

An anti-derailment apparatus for a bogie of a rail vehicle of the disclosure comprises at least one mounting seat (1) which is mounted at the bottom of the bogie (9) of a rail vehicle, and an anti-derailment slide plate (2) arranged on the mounting seat (1) extending toward the ground rail (8). The transverse orientation of the anti-derailment slide plate (2) on the mounting seat (1) and the extending length of the anti-derailment slide plate (2) in the vertical direction meet the following requirements simultaneously: 1) making the anti-derailment slide plate (2) located at the inside of the ground rail (8) when the rail vehicle runs normally; 2) when at least one wheelset (6) of the rail vehicle climbs rail, the anti-derailment slide plate (2) acts on the ground rail (8) to form lateral limitation points so as to limit the freedom of the rail vehicle and make it still constrained by the ground rail (8). The anti-derailment apparatus of the disclosure can avoid the bogie of a rail vehicle from occurring derailment during operation, especially can avoid derailment which may occur after the wheelset climbing rail, increasing safety and transport efficiency of the train.


Patent
Central South University | Date: 2017-08-02

Disclosed is a telescopic type collision energy absorption device for a rail vehicle, which includes two sets of mechanisms functioned individually. The two sets of mechanisms are mounted respectively on either side of end portion of the vehicle. Each set of the mechanism includes an anti-climber, an energy absorption circular tube, pull rings, cutters, cutter fixing blocks, a mounting base, a cutter base, a guide cartridge, a double-acting type air cylinder, a base, bolts, torsional springs, pins, locating slots, a double-acting type solenoid valve, a controller and air storage tank. When the energy absorption device is in a non-operating state, the double-acting type air cylinder is in a state of tension where it pulls the energy absorption circular tube in such a way that the energy absorption circular tube is retracted into the interior of the guide cartridge, the cutters are pressed against the outer wall of the energy absorption circular tube. Before a collision of the vehicle, the double-acting type air cylinder under the effect of the high-pressure air pushes the second tube in such a way that the second tube is ejected outwards, the cutters are pressed against the locating slots of the energy absorption circular tube under the effect of spring force. The cutters cut the energy absorption structure and absorb the energy when the energy absorption circular tube is subjected to an external force and retracts towards the interior of the guide cartridge.


A method for removing prior particle boundaries and hole defects of a powder metallurgy high-temperature alloy. The method includes performing mechanical ball milling treatment on an atomized powder, thermosetting the powder to form a shape, and preparing a powder metallurgy high-temperature alloy.


This invention relates to a preparation method of rare earth oxide dispersion strengthened fee grain tungsten materials, the mass percent of the rare earth oxide is of 0.1-2%, and the rest ingredient is W. Weigh soluble rare earth salt and tungstate, dissolve into water to made into 50-100 g/L of rare earth salt solution and 150-300 g/L of tungstate solution, respectively. Firstly, add trace alkali in rare earth salt solution to control pH in 7-8, then add organic dispersant and stir to form evenly suspended R(OH)_(3 )particle colloid (R refers to rare earth element). Secondly pour the tungstate solution into the R(OH)_(3)colloid, add trace acid to control pH in 6-7, then add organic dispersant and stir to form tungstic acid micro particles, which wrap around the colloidal particles, forming coprecipitation coating particle colloid. Thirdly, the coprecipitation coating particle colloidal is spray-dried, forming tungsten and rare earth oxide compound precursor powder. Alter that, ultrafine or nanoscale tungsten powder with particle size of 50500 nm is obtained through a process of calcination subsequent with hydrogen thermal reduction. Finally, the tungsten powder is subjected to ordinary compression molding and then conventional high temperature sintering. The trace rare earth oxide dispersion strengthened high performance fine grain tungsten materials prepared by this invention, its density is close to full density (98.5% or higher), its grain size is uniform and very fine (average in 510 microns), and the rare earth oxides particles evenly distribute in tungsten intracrystalline or grain, boundary with particle size of 100500 nm.


Patent
Jiangxi Rare Earth & Rare Metals Tungsten Group Holding Co. and Central South University | Date: 2017-08-16

A metallurgical process for a tungsten mineral raw material (100), comprising: employing a weak base leaching agent conducive to forming a local process circulation, the leaching agent generating two or more gases in an evaporative crystallization process, each kind of gas being able to participate again in the synthesis of the leaching agent, and a crystallized separation scrubbing solution being similarly recycled as a leaching agent; and employing a transformation ingredient, the transformation ingredient having a chemical reaction with the tungsten mineral raw material (100) to enable tungsten element to be comprised in an intermediate easily dissolved by the leaching agent, and a leaching residue also comprising an ingredient element, such that at least a part of the leaching residue can be recycled as the ingredient. The process comprises a plurality of closed cycles, and produces no wastewater discharge in the entire process.


SANTA ROSA, CA, May 09, 2017-- Dr. Douglas Fuerstenau has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.For more than six decades, Dr. Fuerstenau has met with success in the field of mineral engineering and education. His early technical interests led him to the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology where he received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1949, Master of Science degree from Montana School of Mines in 1950, and Doctor of Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1953. Dr. Fuerstenau came to prominence as an assistant professor at MIT, followed by being the mineral engineering section leader at the Metals Research Laboratory of Union Carbide Corporation, and then as manager of mineral engineering for Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Corporation. In 1959 he joined the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley, where his main role was in teaching and research in mineral engineering. Through his inspiration, numerous students have achieved notable distinction in careers in academia, industry and government service. Noteworthy roles at Berkeley include chairman of the Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, director of the California Mining and Minerals Resources Research Institute, and longtime advisory committee chair for the Bancroft Mining Oral History program.Elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1976, he is recognized internationally for his contributions to mineral processing and extractive metallurgy, and his research results are widely used and referenced extensively. Dr. Fuerstenau has been an active member of technical societies such as the American Institute of Mining, Metallugical and Petroleum Engineers, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and the American Chemical Society, chairing or serving on committees and organizing symposia. He has served on numerous advisory boards to universities, international editorial boards, government committees and boards regarding mineral resources, and has contributed widely to international mineral resource programs. He has been a guest professor at Imperial College, London, and at the Universities of Karlsruhe and Clausthal, Germany, and is an honorary professor at the Central South University in Changsha, China, and also at the Huainan Institute of Technology.In recognition of his professional achievements, Dr. Fuerstenau has received many national and international awards, including the Alexander von Humboldt Senior American Scientist Award and the International Mineral Processing Congress Lifetime Achievement Award. He received honorary doctorates from the University of Liege and Lulea University. His international recognition also includes election to the engineering academies of Australia, India, the Russian Federation, and the Balkans. In addition, he was selected for inclusion into Who's Who in America, Who's Who in Science and Engineering, Who's Who in the West, Who's Who in the World, and Who's Who in Finance and Industry.As he looks to the future, Dr. Fuerstenau continues to contribute to technical societies, universities, international conferences, editorial boards, research and publication, and to sustainable mineral projects.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com

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