Central Soil and Water Conservation Reserach and Training Institute

Dehradun, India

Central Soil and Water Conservation Reserach and Training Institute

Dehradun, India

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Goswami S.,Dolphin Institute of Biomedical and Natural science | Verma K.S.,Institute of Biotechnology and Environmental science | Kaushal R.,Central Soil and Water Conservation Reserach and Training Institute
Biological Agriculture and Horticulture | Year: 2014

Climate change is one of the major issues that require immediate attention. Sequestering carbon (C) through agroforestry is one of the ways to contribute to global climate change mitigation. In the present study, agroforestry land use systems existing on arable and non-arable lands in the Kwalkhad Watershed of middle Himalayan region of Himachal Pradesh, India, were evaluated for C sequestration and C credits. In total, eight land use systems existed in the watershed. Agrisilvihorticulture (ASH) system (14.78 Mg ha-1) and agrihortisilviculture (AHS) system (14.45 Mg ha-1) sequestered a high amount of C than silvipasture (SP), pure agriculture or grassland and abandoned land, though not significantly more than agrisilviculture (AS) or agrihorticulture. Total C pool in abandoned soils (0-40 cm) was highest followed by SP and ASH system. C stocks in soil (0-40 cm) exceeded C stocks in plants by a factor of 15.81 for AHS system. SP, ASH and AS systems, with their higher C mitigation potential of 1.71, 1.52 and 1.43, respectively, were more suitable land use systems for C mitigation in the region. The ASH system produced the most (21.49) C credits on a per-hectare basis. © 2014 Taylor and Francis.


Verma K.S.,Dr. Y.S. Parmar University of Horticulture and Forestry | Kohli S.,Dr. Y.S. Parmar University of Horticulture and Forestry | Kaushal R.,Central Soil and Water Conservation Reserach and Training Institute | Chaturvedi O.P.,Central Soil and Water Conservation Reserach and Training Institute
Journal of Mountain Science | Year: 2014

The tree root distribution pattern and biomass of seventeen year old trees of Grewia optiva, Morus alba, Celtis australis, Bauhinia variegata and Robinia pseudoacacia were studied by excavation method. B. variegata roots penetrated to a maximum depth of 4.78 m, whereas, M. alba roots were found down to 1.48 m depth. Lateral spread was minimum in B. variegata (1.10 m) and maximum in R. pseudoacacia (7.33 m). Maximum root biomass of 6.30 kg was found in R. pseudoacacia and minimum (2.43 kg) was found in M. alba. For four species viz., G. optiva, M. alba, C. australis and R. pseudoacacia, 68%-87% root biomass occurred within top 0-30 cm soil depth, but for B. variegata this was only 45%. The soil binding factor was maximum in G. optiva and minimum in B. variegata. Soil physico-chemical properties also showed wide variation. The study suggests that B. variegata with a deep root system is the most suitable species for plantation under agroforestry systems. R. pseudoacacia and G. optiva with deep root systems, more lateral spread and high soil binding factor are suitable for plantation on degraded lands for soil conservation. © Science Press and Institute of Mountain Hazards and Environment, CAS and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014.


Gulabrao Y.A.,Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture & Technology | Kaushal R.,Central Soil and Water Conservation Reserach and Training Institute | Tewari S.K.,Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture & Technology | Tomar J.M.S.,Central Soil and Water Conservation Reserach and Training Institute | Chaturvedi O.P.,Central Soil and Water Conservation Reserach and Training Institute
Journal of Forestry Research | Year: 2012

We investigated the influence of season on the rooting behaviour of eight important bamboo species viz., Bambusa balcooa, B. bambos, B. nutans, B. tulda, B. vulgaris, Dendrocalamus giganteus, D. hamiltonii and D. strictus. We collected 2-3 node culm cuttings in three growing seasons viz. spring (March), summer (June) and rainy (August) from superior candidate plus clumps (CPCs) centralized in the germplasm garden. Cuttings were placed horizontally in sand and were provided with intermittent misting at regular intervals. Bamboo species exhibited differential rhizogenesis behavior in different seasons. The study reveals significant variation in sprouting and rooting behaviour in different bamboo species. B. bambos had maximum rooting (78.89%), followed by B. vulgaris (74.44%). In general, the potential of different bamboo species for rooting was found to be in the order: B. bambos > B. vulgaris > B. balcooa > D. hamiltonii > B. tulda > D. strictus > D. giganteus >B. nutans. The maximum rooting was recorded in spring (56.67%), which was closely followed by summer (54.58%). In winter season, minimum rooting (36.67%) was observed. The interaction effect of species × season was also significant on sprouting and rooting parameters. In B. balcooa, B. nutans, B. vulgaris, D. hamiltonii and D. strictus, cuttings collected in summer season showed maximum sprouting and rooting, whereas, B. bambos, B. tulda and D. giganteus had maximum rooting in spring. The maximum number of roots developed per cutting was observed in B. tulda (43.8) during spring season. © 2012 Northeast Forestry University and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

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