Central Road Research Institute CRRI

Delhi, India

Central Road Research Institute CRRI

Delhi, India

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Kumar R.,Central Road Research Institute CRRI | Bhattacharjee B.,Indian Institute of Technology Delhi
Indian Concrete Journal | Year: 2014

This paper describes the performance of Polypropylene (PP) multifilament vis - à - vis fibrillated fibre on slump, bleeding, settlement, compressive strength, flexural strength, drying shrinkage and abrasion resistance of concrete. Three different dosages of fibre i.e. 0.05%, 0.10% and 0.15% by volume were used in the study. The test results indicate that fibrillated fibre is more effective in reducing settlement of concrete in comparison with multifilament fibre. Further, a similar effect for both fibres on compressive strength, flexural strength and abrasion resistance of concrete was observed. However, a better performance for drying shrinkage control and energy absorbing capacity for the concrete reinforced with fibrillated fibre than multifilament fibre were noted.


Kumar R.,University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee | Kumar R.,Central Road Research Institute CRRI | Naik T.R.,Center for By Products Utilisation
Indian Concrete Journal | Year: 2014

Manufacturing of greener concrete requires judicious use of natural resources and lower environmental impact in comparison with conventional concrete. This is generally achieved through reduced mining of natural resources required for manufacture of a concrete. tire derived fuel (TDF) is popular as the energy provided by the burning of tires is comparable to that of oil and greater than that of coal. tires are low in sulfur and have low NOx gas emissions, and can produce a cleaner ash than coal. In addition, end users can often get tires at a lower price compared to other fuels, making it a very cost effective option. By utilizing cement kilns controlled combustion environment scraped tire are being used as environmentally sound source of energy for the manufacturing of cement. tire rubber is ground to a particulate form termed as crumb rubber modifier (CRM) because its inclusion modifies properties of the asphaltic material.


Kumar R.,University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee | Kumar R.,Central Road Research Institute CRRI | Naik T.R.,Center for By Products Utilisation
Indian Concrete Journal | Year: 2014

Similar to other industrial manufacturing process, the production of Portland cement and concrete implies emissions of GHGs to the atmosphere in addition to a significant amount of consumption of natural resources. Consequently, cement and concrete industry is being held responsible as a significant contributor to the global climate change and a cause for unsustainable rate of depletion of natural resources. Manufacturing of concrete and its products have a significant impact on the environments since the manufacturing of the main constituent of concrete, Portland cement, is responsible for emission of about 7% of the total global anthropogenic carbon dioxide. The success of such technology depends on local conditions, norms, and practices. Understanding of the environmental issues in the manufacturing activities of concrete and its products are the main driving force for the advent of greener concrete.


Errampalli M.,Central Road Research Institute CRRI | Okushima M.,Tokushima University | Akiyama T.,Kansai University
Simulation | Year: 2013

Microscopic traffic simulation (MTS) has attracted increasing attention in the last two decades as it analyzes individual vehicle/driver behavior more precisely and realistically than other methods. MTS is nothing but a series of human decisions under various traffic situations. Since human element is involved at many stages of simulation, the possibility of approximation/error in the decisions would be high. In this direction, the fuzzy logic technique appropriately takes such approximations into account while modeling drivers' decisions. Some of the MTS models have considered fuzzy logic in at most one or two models, such as car following, lane change behavior, etc., with limited urban congested conditions. However, human involvement exists beyond these and realistic output from the simulation would not be possible unless the approximations involved at different stages are appropriately and simultaneously considered. In the present study, a Fuzzy Logic based Microscopic Traffic Simulation Model (FLoMiTSiM) to describe human behavior on the urban road network in many possible situations is proposed and appropriately validated using the observed data from the city of Gifu, Japan. To demonstrate the applicability and suitability of the proposed FLoMiTSiM, bus priority policies, namely bus lanes, are evaluated. © 2012 The Society for Modeling and Simulation International.


Goel P.,Central Road Research Institute CRRI | Kumar R.,Central Road Research Institute CRRI | Bhattacharjee B.,Indian Institute of Technology Delhi
Indian Concrete Journal | Year: 2015

The structural applications of synthetic fibre reinforced concrete (SNFRC) have increased due to improvement of material properties such as resistance to cracking under drying shrinkage, energy absorbing capacity, and ability to resist shattering forces. However, the improvement in material properties of SNFRC varies with the fibre dosages, fibre types, fibre diameter, fibre lengths etc. This research study is to compare the effects of the polypropylene and polyester fibres with different lengths on the mechanical properties i.e. compressive, splitting tensile and flexural strengths besides drying shrinkage, energy absorbing capacity and abrasion resistance of a paving grade concrete mix of 48 MPa at 28 days.


Shah Y.U.,Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee | Jain S.S.,Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee | Tiwari D.,Central Road Research institute CRRI | Jain M.K.,Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee
International Journal of Pavement Research and Technology | Year: 2013

The concept of "serviceability" of roads and its evolution through time is widely accepted by pavement engineers and professionals as a way to evaluate road quality and conditions. Both the Present Serviceability Index (PSI) and International Roughness Index (IRI) can be used as indicators of road riding quality and serviceability. The objective of the present study was to develop realistic models for estimating PSI for asphalt pavement sections located in the urban city of Noida, near Delhi, the capital of India. The PSI model was developed as a function of the pavement age. An attempt was made to calibrate the American Association of State Highway & Transportation Officials (AASHTO) equation for PSI and determine the suitability of this equation in Indian pavement conditions for selected urban roads. The developed models were also validated. Based on the developed PSI model, the maintenance alternatives have been suggested for the urban road sections in the study area. © Chinese Society of Pavement Engineering.


Shah Y.U.,Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee | Jain S.S.,Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee | Tiwari D.,Central Road Research Institute CRRI | Jain M.K.,Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee
Airfield and Highway Pavement 2013: Sustainable and Efficient Pavements - Proceedings of the 2013 Airfield and Highway Pavement Conference | Year: 2013

Serviceability is an indicator that represents the level of service a pavement provides to the users. This subjective opinion is closely related to objective aspects, which can be measured on the pavement's surface. Modelling the present serviceability index is very important in pavement management systems. In the present study, the present serviceability index (PSI) has been analyzed using artificial neural networks (ANN) for the flexible pavements of urban roads. The study area considered constitutes 21 urban road sections for Noida city in the NCR of New Delhi, capital of India. Field data collected include slope variance, rut depth, patches, cracking, and longitudinal cracking for two consecutive years on the selected road network. The developed ANN model was also compared with a model developed using multilinear regression analysis. © 2013 American Society of Civil Engineers.


Kumar R.,Central Road Research Institute CRRI
Indian Concrete Journal | Year: 2016

The current practices of the construction of cement concrete road for highways in India require a layer of dry lean concrete (DLC) as a base course over which pavement quality concrete slabs rest. Even the Municipal's concrete roads including white-topping are being constructed using DLC base course. DLC is mostly manufactured with ordinary portland cement as per Indian Road Congress specification SP-49: 1998. IRC SP-49: 1998, advocates the use of portland pozzolana cement (PPC) and portland slag cement (PSC) also in the manufacture of DLC but says nothing about the concrete mix proportioning i.e. the amount of such cement, aggregate-to-cement ratio and moisture content for the DLC to be manufactured with PPC and PSC. PPC is widely available in market all over the India, however, PPC has properties significantly different from OPC. Hence, in this research study the amount of cement (OPC and PPC), maximum aggregate-to-cement ratio and moisture content for the manufacture of DLC with OPC and PPC meeting the requirement of IRC specification in term of strength development has been presented. The study suggests the following important conclusions: The minimum quantity of PPC for the manufacture of DLC satisfying the compressive strength requirement is at least 10% higher than that of OPC. The aggregate to cement ratio satisfying the strength requirement criteria of the IRC SP-49 is significantly lesser in the case of PPC than that of OPC. The optimum moisture content of DLC containing PPC is about 16-17% higher than that of OPC.


Kumar R.,Central Road Research Institute CRRI
Indian Concrete Journal | Year: 2016

As a consequence of ever increasing demand for quality aggregate for the construction of concrete based infrastructures many parts of the world are facing the problem of the scarcity of good quality aggregate for concrete. Among all alternate sources for aggregate, the recycling of construction and demolition (C&D) waste has an upper hand as it is available everywhere. A C&D waste is typically composed of wood, plaster, concrete, bitumen, roofing materials, glass, plastics, metal, insulating materials, and other similar materials depending on the locality of its origin. Recycled concrete aggregate derived from crushing of the concrete elements of C&D waste, is inhomogeneous unlike natural aggregate derived from a crushed rock. Thus, a thorough evaluation of physical and mechanical properties of such aggregate before using in concrete is needed. This study presents a comparative evaluation of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) obtained from a commercial recycling plant with respect to a natural virgin aggregate in maximum size range of 10-20 mm. The comparison showed a significant reduction in the value of the specific gravity, bulk density, and abrasion resistance for the RCA. The water absorption of the RCA was more than eight folds to that of natural crushed aggregate. The study further presents the influence of 50% and 100% replacement of natural coarse aggregate with RCA on the compressive strength, flexural strength and water absorption of concrete mixes and concludes that 50% replacement of natural aggregate with RCA has insignificant influence on compressive and flexural strength of concrete but the overall durability of such concrete is inferior to the control concrete which limits its applicability.

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