Lopez Jaena, Philippines

Central Philippine University

www.cpu.edu.ph
Lopez Jaena, Philippines

Central Philippine University is a private research university located in Iloilo City, Philippines. It was established in 1905 under the auspices of the American Baptist Foreign Mission Society as a two separate schools: the Jaro Industrial School for boys and a bible school to train ministers and other Christian workers. Central is the second American university in Asia. Later in 1913, women were gradually admitted to the school for boys, and eventually the school started offering high school education in 1920. In 1923, the school for boys merged with the Bible school when it became a junior college and started offering college degrees, and in 1953, attained university status.Central pioneered nursing education in the Philippines, when Presbyterian American missionaries established the Union Mission Hospital Training School for Nurses in 1906. In the same year also, the CPU Republic , the university's official student governing body was organized, making it as the first student governing body to be established in Asia. On the other hand, Central was the first institution to pioneered the work-study-program in the country that were later patterned and followed by other institutions. The university's hospital, the Iloilo Mission Hospital, which was established in 1901 by the Presbyterian Americans, is the first Protestant founded hospital in the country and the first American hospital in the entire Asian continent.The university at present is affiliated with the Convention of Philippine Baptist Churches and maintains fraternal ties with the International Ministries of the American Baptist Churches, known before as the American Baptist Foreign Mission Society, but maintains to be non-sectarian and independent.CPU consists fifteen schools and colleges that provides instruction in basic education all the way up to the post-graduate levels. In the undergraduate and graduate levels, its covered disciplines include the Accountancy, Arts and science, Business, Computer Studies, Education, Engineering, Law, Mass Communication, Medical Laboratory science, Medicine, Pharmacy, Lifestyle and Fitness, Tourism, Nursing and Theology. The Commission on Higher Education have granted the University a full autonomous status, the same government agency that accredited some of its programs as Centers of Development. The International Organization for Standardization certifies Central as one of the ten ISO certified educational institutions in the Philippines. Recently, through international collaborations with other institutions has made CPU to offer undergraduate, graduate and doctorate business programs at Thai Nguyen University of Economics and Business Administration in Vietnam. Wikipedia.

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Romallosa A.R.D.,Central Philippine University | Romallosa A.R.D.,Bauhaus University Weimar | Kraft E.,Bauhaus University Weimar
Resources | Year: 2017

A technical and socio-economic feasibility study of biomass briquette production was performed in Iloilo City, Philippines, by integrating a registered group of the informal sector. The study has shown that the simulated production of biomass briquettes obtained from the municipal waste stream could lead to a feasible on-site fuel production line after determining its usability, quality and applicability to the would-be users. The technology utilized for briquetting is not complicated when operated due to its simple, yet sturdy design with suggestive results in terms of production rate, bulk density and heating value of the briquettes produced. Quality briquettes were created from mixtures of waste paper, sawdust and carbonized rice husk, making these material flows a renewable source of cost-effective fuels. An informal sector that would venture into briquette production can be considered profitable for small business enterprising, as demonstrated in the study. The informal sector from other parts of the world, having similar conditionality with that of the Uswag Calajunan Livelihood Association, Inc. (UCLA), could play a significant role in the recovery of these reusable waste materials from the waste stream and can add value to them as alternative fuels and raw materials (AFR) for household energy supply using appropriate technologies. © 2016 by the authors.


Patricio H.G.,Central Philippine University | Palada M.C.,Central Philippine University
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2017

Eighteen moringa accessions from AVRDC - The World Vegetable Center were evaluated for their adaptability and horticultural characteristics in an observational trial at Central Philippine University, Iloilo City, Philippines from June 2009 to May 2012. The accessions originated from India, Laos, Philippines, Taiwan, Tanzania, Thailand and USA. Eight accessions had 100% germination, another eight had 80% while two accessions from Thailand had only 40% germination. All seeds that germinated developed into healthy seedlings with 75 to 100% survival. At 28 weeks after second pruning, accessions Mo-2 (USA) and Mo-40 (India) were the tallest whereas Mo-34 (India) was the shortest. Mean stem diameter ranged from 3.5 (Mo-34) to 8.5 cm (Mo-4, Thailand). Mo-38 (Thailand) had the most branches, whereas Mo-33 (Philippines) had the least. Two accessions from Thailand (Mo-4 and Mo-14) had the highest leaf fresh weight. However, Mo-6 (Thailand) produced the highest percent dry matter. Of the 18 accessions, only 11 developed flowers which started to appear 49 to 93 days after transplanting (DAT). Of these 11 accessions, only 9 produced pods which developed from 75 to 182 DAT. Mo-3 (Taiwan) developed the most pods but Mo-34 produced the most seeds one year after planting. Three years after planting, all the accessions except Mo-4 and Mo-6 developed flowers, pods and seeds with Mo-38 producing the most seeds per pod and Mo-15 having the most seeds per tree. Red mites (Tetranychus urticae), defoliators, leaf-footed bug (Leptoglossus phyllopus) and whiteflies (Bemisia sp.) were present in the field but caused only minor damage to plants. Stem rot was the only pathogenic disease observed. These results indicate that Mo-4 and Mo-14 are ideal for fresh leaves whereas Mo-2 and Mo-6 are ideal for dry matter production. Furthermore, Mo-15, Mo-7, Mo-9 and Mo-34 are desirable accessions for seed production.


Palada M.C.,Central Philippine University | Ebert A.W.,World Vegetable Center | Yang R.-Y.,World Vegetable Center | Chang L.C.,World Vegetable Center | And 2 more authors.
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2017

The World Vegetable Center has a collection of over 50 moringa accessions, majority of which belong to M. oleifera. The planting of this species in southern Taiwan started some 35 years ago. The World Vegetable Center initiated research on moringa in 2001. A small project was established to introduce and evaluate a number of moringa accessions collected from Asia, Africa and USA. The accessions were evaluated for growth characteristics and horticultural traits, aiming at high leaf production and nutritional value. A total of 50 accessions were collected and from this collection, seeds of 42 accessions representing four species (Moringa oleifera, M. stenopetala, M. drouhardii and M. peregrina) were germinated and transplanted to the field for seed multiplication, characterization and evaluation. Twenty-two accessions produced sufficient seeds for replicated evaluation trials and seed distribution. Ten promising accessions were selected and evaluated in replicated trials over a two-year period. Among those, three accessions showed fresh young shoot yield averaging 20-40 t ha-1. The effects of leaf type (age), harvest season and variety on nutrient content were investigated as a component of this study. Results showed no significant differences for most nutrient contents among accessions. Mature leaves are more nutritious than young leaves or shoots. Nutrient content varied with harvest season. Calcium, vitamins A and E were higher in hot-wet season in southern Taiwan than during winter, whereas Fe and vitamin C were higher in cool-dry season than in summer. Subsequent field evaluation studies revealed the variability of Moringa accessions in terms of horticultural traits. The accessions varied significantly in plant height, stem diameter, leaf and stem biomass, number of side shoots, tolerance to flooding and survival after heavy rainfall and strong wind brought about by tropical typhoons. Superior and promising accessions are being multiplied to meet the increasing demand for seed and planting materials of moringa. During the last ten years, the World Vegetable Center has distributed moringa germplasm to universities, government organizations, non-governmental organizations and private companies in 15 countries. The Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand, Germany, Vietnam, Egypt, The Netherlands, and Pakistan were the top recipient countries. Moringa is also distributed in seed kits for home garden projects in Asia and Africa.


Palada M.C.,Central Philippine University
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2017

Moringa is one of the world's most useful trees and in the Philippines almost all parts of the plant are used for food and traditional medicine. Various research and development efforts are currently focused on food fortification to utilize the nutritional value of moringa and its medicinal potentials. For the past 10 years the moringa industry in the Philippines has grown significantly as research and development efforts have focused on this crop. Moringa leaves and seed oil are the major raw materials used in the food and nutrition industry, in cosmetics and herbal medicine. The leaf powder is mainly used for food fortification as ingredient of bread, noodles, juices, milk and tea, while the leaf powder capsule is mostly used as food supplement and herbal medicine. Moringa oil is predominantly used in cosmetics and personal health care products such as shampoo, soap, perfumes and skin care. More new moringa-based products are being developed by more than 20 food and cosmetic industries in the Philippines. In spite of the growing moringa industry there is a shortage of good quality fresh and dry moringa raw materials. The supply of moringa powder is inadequate and unstable and can be attributed to a scarcity of seed and planting materials. There is no stable and commercial moringa oil industry due to limited seed supply. The moringa industry in the Philippines is slowly being developed with the assistance of the government and private sectors. The next step is to develop a national program for the industry. There are gaps that need to be addressed. Establishing good agricultural practices and stringent regulations to guarantee the quality and stability of moringa products is top priority. Addressing the great demand for planting materials is another major challenge. The opportunities of moringa-based products seem bright and key players are aiming to penetrate the international market.


Patricio H.G.,Central Philippine University | Palada M.C.,Central Philippine University | Deloso H.E.,Central Philippine University | Garcia D.E.,Central Philippine University
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2017

This study was conducted to determine the leaf biomass of moringa as influenced by plant density and frequency of pruning. Moringa plants were grown at four plant spacings and densities: a) 1×1 m (10,000 plants ha-1 - pph); b) 1×0.5 m (20,000 pph); c) 0.9×0.37 m (30,000 pph) and d) 0.5×0.5 m (40,000 pph), and harvested at three frequencies: 4, 6, and 8 weeks after first pruning for all treatments. The field trial was established and evaluated in a factorial randomized block design with three replications. Moringa seeds of cultivar 'PKM-1' were directly sown in various plots on December 12, 2013. Furrow and sprinkler irrigation were applied once per week to maintain optimum soil moisture for germination and seedling growth. Triple 14 fertilizer was applied at the rate of one tablespoon per plant three weeks after emergence. Seed germination was recorded 10 days after sowing and plant height was measured on a periodic basis. Initial pruning for all treatments was performed to a height of 1 m when plants reached 2 m at 116 days after sowing. Thereafter, harvesting frequencies were followed according to treatments. Results on leaf biomass indicated no increasing trend in leaf fresh biomass with increasing plant density except at 8-week harvest frequency. Highest fresh biomass of 30 t ha-1 was obtained from 40,000 pph harvested at 8-week interval. The lowest fresh leaf biomass was obtained at 10,000 pph. Data on fresh leaf biomass from plants harvested at 4-and 6-week interval at high density (40,000 pph) suggest that these treatments are optimum when there is a monthly demand for fresh raw materials for leaf processing into moringa by-product.


Calibjo C.C.,Central Philippine University | Nerves A.C.,University of the Philippines at Diliman
10th International Power and Energy Conference, IPEC 2012 | Year: 2012

Applying a novel non-dominated sorting differential evolutionary algorithm (NSDEA) procedure to a DC power flow based multi-objective transmission expansion planning (MOTEP) model, this paper aims to develop a Reference Grid Performance Assessment Model that can be used as a benchmark when evaluating investment proposals for the transmission upgrade. Investment cost, line rental cost and amount of load curtailment are considered in the optimization as the three objective prerequisites. In addition, the static MOTEP problem has been investigated in both greenfield and expansion planning problem with and without generation rescheduling considerations. The proposed model was applied to a realistic 46-bus South Brazilian system. Simulation results show the accuracy, outstanding convergence performance in finding the optimal solution, simple implementation as well as satisfactory computation time of the proposed solution technique. © 2012 IEEE.


Wu D.L.,World Vegetable Center | Palada M.C.,Central Philippine University | Luther G.C.,World Vegetable Center
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2012

A major constraint limiting yield and production of sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum) during the hot-wet season in the highland tropics is the high incidence of soil-borne diseases including bacterial wilt-BW (Ralstonia solanacearum) and Phytophthora blight-PB (Phytophthora capsici). High temperature and humidity during the wet season favor development of these soil pathogens. A technology on grafting sweet pepper scion onto chili pepper rootstock with resistance to both diseases and flooding was developed at AVRDC - The World Vegetable Center since 2002. Several chili pepper lines were identified with high resistance to BW and PB. From 2007 to 2008, on-farm trials were conducted in Nantou, Central Taiwan to evaluate disease resistance and subsequent yield of sweet pepper cultivars grafted onto resistant chili pepper rootstocks. In both years, the incidence of PB and BW was significantly (P≤0.05) lower in grafted than non-grafted plants. Marketable fruit yields averaged over four sweet pepper cultivars (scions) were significantly (P≤0.05) greater in plants grafted onto seven chili rootstock lines compared to non-grafted plants. Outstanding and high yielding sweet pepper cultivars were 'Andalus' and 'Hazera'. Six outstanding chili pepper rootstock lines with low incidence of BW and PB were identified in these trials. This study indicates that grafting technology is effective in reducing soil-borne diseases of sweet pepper which leads to increased yield and production during the hot-wet season in tropical highlands.


Palada M.C.,Central Philippine University | Patricio H.G.,Central Philippine University | Ebert A.W.,World Vegetable Center | Wu D.L.,World Vegetable Center
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2015

The major objective of this study was to evaluate a subset of the AVRDC Moringa oleifera germplasm collection for important horticultural traits in the Philippines and Taiwan. The 18 AVRDC moringa accessions originated from India, Laos, Philippines, Taiwan, Tanzania, Thailand and USA. Three-month-old seedlings were transplanted onto single-row raised beds spaced 1.5 m apart. Plants were arranged in a randomized block design with three replications. Data were collected on plant height, stem diameter, number of branches, canopy width, fresh and dry biomass (stems and leaves), days to flowering, and pod/seed yield. In Taiwan, one month after transplanting four accessions attained a plant height of above 1 m. Number of side branches ranged from 9 to 14 per plant. Differences in plant height and stem diameter were significant at 70 days after transplanting (DAT). Tallest plants (2.9 m) were observed in 'Mo-35' from Tanzania while 'Mo-8' from Thailand produced the largest stem diameter (36 cm). Leaf fresh weight and dry biomass was highest (15.8 and 9.2 t ha-1, respectively) for 'Mo-35' at 70 DAT. Survival and stand count decreased after two strong typhoons and severe flooding in 2009 and 2010. In the Philippines, accessions 'Mo-2' (USA) and 'Mo-40' (India) produced the tallest plants 28 weeks after second pruning. Mean stem diameter ranged from 3.5 cm ('Mo-34') to 8.5 cm ('Mo-4'). 'Mo-38' (Thailand) produced the highest number of branches. Two accessions from Thailand ('Mo-4' and 'Mo-14') resulted in the highest leaf fresh weight, which exceeded 20 t ha-1 from two prunings, while 'Mo-29' (India) produced the highest dry leaf biomass. Most accessions tolerated waterlogged conditions with 60-100% plant survival stand count. The results indicate that there are moringa accessions with promising horticultural traits for the high rainfall climate of Southeast Asia.


Cabarles Jr. J.C.,Central Philippine University
Tropical Animal Health and Production | Year: 2012

Poultry genetic resources diversity serves as a reservoir of genes adaptable to local conditions, production, resource utilization, and production that are compatible with consumer preferences for meat and egg products. This study was, therefore, conducted to determine the production potentials of native chickens in Western Visayas, Philippines. A total of 270 raisers were interviewed and 810 chickens were characterized. These numbers were divided equally among the provinces of Aklan, Antique, Capiz, Guimaras, Iloilo, and Negros Occidental. The data collected were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and significant differences were determined using the Duncan's Multiple Range Test. Results show that native chickens from Aklan had the highest (P<0. 01) hatching percentage (93. 10 ± 1. 67 %) and oldest (P < 0. 01) slaughter/marketing age (23. 56 ± 1. 03 weeks). Those from Guimaras had the biggest (P < 0. 01) egg (42. 69 ± 0. 87 g) and heaviest slaughter/marketing weight (920. 00 ± 22. 72 to 924. 44 ± 23. 01 g); the shortest (P < 0. 01) clutch interval (77. 87 ± 4. 14 days) was observed from those in Iloilo. Those from Antique had the highest (P < 0. 01) survival rate from 1 day old to a slaughter/marketing age of 52. 48 ± 1. 83 %. The adult live weight ranged from 1. 27 ± 0. 04 to 1. 62 ± 0. 04 kg with those from Aklan as the lowest (P <0. 01) while those from Guimaras were the highest. Thus, the observed variations in reproductive and growth performances of native chickens from this region expressed their potentials for genetic improvement toward production. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


PubMed | Central Philippine University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Tropical animal health and production | Year: 2013

Poultry genetic resources diversity serves as a reservoir of genes adaptable to local conditions, production, resource utilization, and production that are compatible with consumer preferences for meat and egg products. This study was, therefore, conducted to determine the production potentials of native chickens in Western Visayas, Philippines. A total of 270 raisers were interviewed and 810 chickens were characterized. These numbers were divided equally among the provinces of Aklan, Antique, Capiz, Guimaras, Iloilo, and Negros Occidental. The data collected were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and significant differences were determined using the Duncans Multiple Range Test. Results show that native chickens from Aklan had the highest (P < 0.01) hatching percentage (93.10 1.67 %) and oldest (P < 0.01) slaughter/marketing age (23.56 1.03 weeks). Those from Guimaras had the biggest (P < 0.01) egg (42.69 0.87 g) and heaviest slaughter/marketing weight (920.00 22.72 to 924.44 23.01 g); the shortest (P < 0.01) clutch interval (77.87 4.14 days) was observed from those in Iloilo. Those from Antique had the highest (P < 0.01) survival rate from 1 day old to a slaughter/marketing age of 52.48 1.83 %. The adult live weight ranged from 1.27 0.04 to 1.62 0.04 kg with those from Aklan as the lowest (P < 0.01) while those from Guimaras were the highest. Thus, the observed variations in reproductive and growth performances of native chickens from this region expressed their potentials for genetic improvement toward production.

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