Central Square, MO, United States

Central Methodist University

www.centralmethodist.edu
Central Square, MO, United States

Central Methodist University is a private, coeducational, liberal arts university located in Fayette, Missouri. CMU is an accredited four-year institution of higher education and offers masters, bachelors, and associate degrees. The school is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. Wikipedia.

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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has analyzed more than a dozen metrics to rank Missouri’s best universities and colleges for 2017. Of the 40 four-year schools on the list, Washington University in St. Louis, Saint Louis University, Maryville University of Saint Louis, William Jewell College and Rockhurst University were the top five. 14 two-year schools also made the list, and State Fair Community College, Crowder College, Jefferson College, East Central College and State Technical College of Missouri were ranked as the best five. A full list of the winning schools is included below. “The schools on our list have created high-quality learning experiences for students in Missouri, with career outcomes in mind,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.Org. “They’ve shown this through the certificates and degrees that they offer, paired with excellent employment services and a record of strong post-college earnings for grads.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in Missouri” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also appraised on additional data that includes annual alumni salaries 10 years after entering college, employment services, student/teacher ratio, graduation rate and the availability of financial aid. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Missouri” list, visit: The Best Four-Year Colleges in Missouri for 2017 include: Avila University Baptist Bible College Calvary Bible College and Theological Seminary Central Methodist University-College of Liberal Arts and Sciences College of the Ozarks Columbia College Culver-Stockton College Drury University Evangel University Fontbonne University Hannibal-LaGrange University Harris-Stowe State University Kansas City Art Institute Lincoln University Lindenwood University Maryville University of Saint Louis Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary Missouri Baptist University Missouri Southern State University Missouri State University-Springfield Missouri University of Science and Technology Missouri Valley College Missouri Western State University Northwest Missouri State University Park University Rockhurst University Saint Louis University Southeast Missouri State University Southwest Baptist University Stephens College Truman State University University of Central Missouri University of Missouri-Columbia University of Missouri-Kansas City University of Missouri-St Louis Washington University in St Louis Webster University Westminster College William Jewell College William Woods University Missouri’s Best Two-Year Colleges for 2017 include: Crowder College East Central College Jefferson College Lake Career and Technical Center Mineral Area College Missouri State University - West Plains Moberly Area Community College North Central Missouri College Ozarks Technical Community College St. Charles Community College State Fair Community College State Technical College of Missouri Texas County Technical College Three Rivers Community College About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


Park J.,Oak Ridge National Laboratory | Lee J.,Oak Ridge National Laboratory | Liu L.,University of Tennessee at Knoxville | Clark K.W.,Central Methodist University | And 8 more authors.
Nature Communications | Year: 2014

Two-dimensional interfaces between crystalline materials have been shown to generate unusual interfacial electronic states in complex oxides. Recently, a one-dimensional interface has been realized in hexagonal boron nitride and graphene planar heterostructures, where a polar-on-nonpolar one-dimensional boundary is expected to possess peculiar electronic states associated with edge states of graphene and the polarity of boron nitride. Here we present a combined scanning tunnelling microscopy and first-principles theory study of the graphene-boron nitride boundary to provide a first glimpse into the spatial and energetic distributions of the one-dimensional boundary states down to atomic resolution. The revealed boundary states are about 0.6 eV below or above the Fermi level depending on the termination of the boron nitride at the boundary, and are extended along but localized at the boundary. These results suggest that unconventional physical effects similar to those observed at two-dimensional interfaces can also exist in lower dimensions. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Central Methodist University, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and University of Tennessee at Knoxville
Type: | Journal: Nature communications | Year: 2014

Two-dimensional interfaces between crystalline materials have been shown to generate unusual interfacial electronic states in complex oxides. Recently, a one-dimensional interface has been realized in hexagonal boron nitride and graphene planar heterostructures, where a polar-on-nonpolar one-dimensional boundary is expected to possess peculiar electronic states associated with edge states of graphene and the polarity of boron nitride. Here we present a combined scanning tunnelling microscopy and first-principles theory study of the graphene-boron nitride boundary to provide a first glimpse into the spatial and energetic distributions of the one-dimensional boundary states down to atomic resolution. The revealed boundary states are about 0.6eV below or above the Fermi level depending on the termination of the boron nitride at the boundary, and are extended along but localized at the boundary. These results suggest that unconventional physical effects similar to those observed at two-dimensional interfaces can also exist in lower dimensions.


Morris D.L.,University of Missouri | Morris D.L.,Central Methodist University | A. Porneluzi P.,Central Methodist University | Haslerig J.,Resource Science | And 2 more authors.
Forest Ecology and Management | Year: 2013

Understanding the relationship between forest management and bird populations requires understanding the effects of silvicultural practices on avian demography at large spatio-temporal scales. The Missouri Ozark Forest Ecosystem Project (MOFEP) is a long-term, large-scale manipulative experiment testing the effects of even-aged (3-13. ha cuts over 10-15% of the site; n= 3), uneven-aged (0.03-3.14. ha cuts over 57% of the site; n= 3), and no harvest forest management on ecosystem level responses. We report on the effects of these management systems on the density and reproductive success of 11 songbird species from 5. years of pre-harvest (1991-1995) to 14. years of post-harvest (1997-2010). Density of four of the five mature forest species were lower after harvest in all management types and did not return to pre-harvest density, even in no harvest sites. Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla) and Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina) responded most negatively to even-aged management in the early post-harvest period (1997-2003) where density was significantly lower than in no harvest sites. Kentucky Warbler (Geothlypis formosa) density increased on uneven-aged and even-aged sites during early post-harvest, but returned to pre-harvest density on both management types by 14. years post-harvest. Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) and Worm-eating Warbler (Helmitheros vermivorus) had lower density in all treatments post-harvest. Among the six early-successional species, density of Blue-winged Warbler (Vermivora cyanoptera), Hooded Warbler (Setophaga citrina), Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) White-eyed Vireo (Vireo griseus) and Yellow-breasted Chat (Icteria virens) were significantly higher in even-aged and uneven-aged sites than in no harvest sites after harvest. Density of Prairie Warbler (Setophaga discolor) were significantly higher only in even-aged management after harvest. Prairie Warbler, Hooded Warbler, and White-eyed vireo appeared on the study sites following harvest while Indigo Bunting, Prairie Warbler, and Yellow-breasted Chat were absent from the study area 14. years post-harvest. Nest survival of mature forest and early-successional species did not change significantly from the pre- to the late post-harvest period or with forest management. Brood parasitism rates remained low from pre-harvest to late post-harvest, but parasitism rates were higher for early-successional species (4%) than mature forest species (1%). Although forest management had variable effects on species, we suggest a modified version of even-aged management could maximize benefits to early-successional species while minimizing decreases in mature forest bird species in central hardwood forests. Rather than the current prescription to harvest 10-15% of the mature stands every 15. years, we recommend harvesting approximately half the number of mature stands with a shorter re-entry period of 8-10. years. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Jones K.L.,University of Missouri | Smith R.M.,Ohio State University | Edwards K.S.,Ohio State University | Givens B.,Ohio State University | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience | Year: 2010

Several studies suggest that prenatal stress is a possible risk factor in the development of autism spectrum disorders. However, many children exposed to stress prenatally are born healthy and develop typically, suggesting that other factors must contribute to autism. Genes that contribute to stress reactivity may, therefore, exacerbate prenatal stress-mediated behavioral changes in the adult offspring. One candidate gene linked to increased stress reactivity encodes the serotonin transporter. Specifically, an insertion/deletion (long/short allele) polymorphism upstream of the serotonin transporter gene correlates with differential expression and function of the serotonin transporter and a heightened response to stressors. Heterozygous serotonin transporter knockout mice show reductions in serotonin transporter expression similar to the human short polymorphism. In this study, the role of prenatal stress and maternal serotonin transporter genotype were assessed in mice to determine whether their combined effect produces reductions in social behavior in the adult offspring. Pregnant serotonin transporter heterozygous knockout and wild-type dams were placed in either a control condition or subjected to chronic variable stress. The adult offspring were subsequently assessed for social interaction and anxiety using a three-chamber social approach task, ultrasonic vocalization detection, elevated-plus maze and an open field task. Results indicated that prenatal stress and reduced serotonin transporter expression of the dam may have the combined effect of producing changes in social interaction and social interest in the offspring consistent with those observed in autism spectrum disorder. This data indicates a possible combined effect of maternal serotonin transporter genotype and prenatal stress contributing to the production of autistic-like behaviors in offspring. © 2010 ISDN.


Morris D.L.,University of Missouri | Morris D.L.,Central Methodist University | Faaborg J.,University of Missouri | Washburn B.E.,University of Missouri | And 2 more authors.
Conservation Physiology | Year: 2015

Renesting after nest predation is ultimately an adaptive response to increase productivity in birds. However, renesting also increases reproductive effort to replace lost clutches. We investigated the consequences of this increased reproductive effort by determining whether renesting in female indigo buntings (Passerina cyanea) is associated with a decline in body condition (size-corrected mass) and haematocrit and an increase in stress hormones and whether renesting or maternal body condition is associated with a decline in productivity (clutch size, nestling body condition). Next, because a consequence of multiple renesting attempts is a prolonged breeding season and later timing, we predicted that a population of post-breeding females and juveniles would have lower body condition in fragmented forest than in contiguous forest owing to higher nest predation and frequency of renesting. Both forest types were settled by females of similar condition. Nest survival was lower in fragmented forest, where a higher proportion of females failed their first attempt and the breeding season was 2 weeks longer. Compared with females on their first attempt, renesting females had lower body condition and haematocrit and higher corticosterone concentrations. Lower maternal body condition was associated with higher concentrations of corticosterone, lower nestling body condition and smaller clutches. Clutch size was lower in renests and in fragmented forest. Nestling condition was lower in renests but did not vary greatly with forest type. Despite a prolonged breeding season in the fragmented forest, post-breeding females and hatch-year birds were in similar condition in both forest types. Our results suggest that the indirect effects of nest predation on maternal and offspring condition pose additional individual-level costs that have not been considered in the context of fragmentation studies. We discuss how predator-induced renesting could have additional demographic consequences by prolonging the breeding season and prompting seasonal interactions or carry-over effects that could impact populations. © The Author 2015.

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