Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute Campus

Cochin, India

Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute Campus

Cochin, India

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Randall J.E.,Bishop Museum | Victor B.C.,Ocean Science Foundation | Victor B.C.,Nova Southeastern University | Alpermann T.J.,Senckenberg Institute | And 4 more authors.
Zootaxa | Year: 2014

Koeda et al. (2014) published a review of fishes of the genus Pempheris of the Red Sea. They concluded that there are four species: P. adusta Bleeker, P. mangula Cuvier, P. nesogallica Cuvier, and a new species, P. tominagai. We show that the first three species they cite are not present in the Red Sea, as follows. 1) P. adusta is a western Pacific species (type locality Ambon), described only from the holotype, and without a dark border on the anal fin. Koeda et al. (2014) mistak-enly apply that name to P. flavicycla which is a widespread Indian Ocean species characterized by a prominent broad black border along the anal fin. Koeda et al. (2014) also redescribe P. adusta, using Indian Ocean specimens of P. flavicycla, despite the coloration difference and a 2.5% difference in the mtDNA sequence (COI) between Indian Ocean and W. Pa-cific populations. 2) P. mangula is a species from the east coast of India (type locality Visakhapatnam), clearly distinct in both gill-raker counts and a 1.1% sequence divergence in COI from its Red Sea relative P. rhomboidea. Pempheris man-gula is not found west of India, and Koeda et al. (2014) mistakenly use DNA from Oman and Madagascar to represent P. mangula, instead of genetic material available from the type locality. 3) Pempheris nesogallica (type locality Mauritius) is unknown from the Red Sea. Koeda et al. (2014) separate P. nesogallica from P. rhomboidea (their "P. mangula") by eye size; we fail to find any difference (and they use their purported eye-size difference to erroneously rename one of the two syntypes of P. nesogallica as "P. mangula"). 4) Their new species P. tominagai is referred to as the Indian Ocean sister species of "P. schwenkii of the Pacific"; however, the type locality of P. schwenkii is the Batu Islands off the SW coast of Sumatra in the Indian Ocean. They mistakenly include specimens of a distant South African species as paratypes of P. tominagai. We have determined that P. tominagai is a valid species endemic to the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. They mis-identify one lot of P. rhomboidea in the collection of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem as their record of P. nesogallica from the Red Sea. They misidentify the specimen in their photograph of Fig. 1B as P. adusta and use it as material for their redescription of the species, but it is now shown to be a paratype of Pempheris bexillon Mooi & Randall, 2014. Addition-ally, they regard P. malabarica Cuvier as a junior synonym of P. molucca Cuvier, but the name P. molucca is based on a fanciful painting and is unavailable as a nomen dubium. They treat Pempheris russellii Day as a junior synonym of P. man-gula; however, it is distinct in having longer pectoral fins, a larger eye, and more gill rakers. Their key to the species of Pempheris of the Red Sea is incorrect. We present a new key and conclude that only three species of Pempheris are pres-ently known from the Red Sea: P. flavicycla, P. rhomboidea, and P. tominagai. Copyright © 2014 Magnolia Press.


K. K B.,Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute Campus | A G.,Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute | J. K J.,National Bureau of Fish Genetic Resources | V. S B.,Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute Campus | And 4 more authors.
Mitochondrial DNA | Year: 2015

Thirty-five individuals of six priacanthid fish species were sampled from different localities along the coast of India covering the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal. The partial sequence of 16S rRNA and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) genes were analyzed for species identification and phylogenetic relationship among the Indian priacanthids (Priacanthus hamrur, P. prolixus, P. blochii, P. sagittarius, Cookeolus japonicus, and Pristigenys refulgens). The intraspecies genetic distance ranged from 0.000 to 0.002, while distances varied from 0.008 to 0.157 interspecies based on 16S sequences. Using COI data analysis, the intraspecies genetic distance ranged from 0.000 to 0.005, while interspecies distances varied from 0.009 to 0.108. Several sequences labeled Priacanthus hamrur in GenBank are shown to be P. prolixus. We also observed cryptic speciation in Heteropriacanthus cruentatus. Partial sequences of 16S rRNA and COI genes provided phylogenetic information to distinguish thirteen species of priacanthids, indicating the usefulness of molecular markers in species identification. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.


Bineesh K.K.,Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute Campus | Akhilesh K.V.,Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute | Gopalakrishnan A.,Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute | Jena J.K.,National Bureau of Fish Genetic Resources
Zootaxa | Year: 2014

A new species of anthiine fish, Plectranthias alcocki n. sp. is described and illustrated based on two specimens, (63.7- 72.5 mm SL), recently collected from deep-waters of the Arabian Sea, off Kollam, Kerala, India. The following combi-nation of characters distinguishes it from all other congeners: Dorsal-fin rays X, 15; anal-fin rays III, 7; pectoral-fin rays 14, all unbranched; pelvic-fin rays I, 5; lateral-line complete, the pored lateral-line scales 28; scales above lateral line to origin of dorsal fin 1; scales dorsally on head extending to posterior nostrils; no scales on maxilla or chin; gill rakers 5 + 11 (2 + 7 developed); circumpeduncular scales 10; fourth dorsal spine longest, 2.8 (2.6) in head length (HL), longest dor-sal-fin soft ray (second) 2.4 (2.7) in head length; body depth 34.4 (35)% SL; head length 46 (49.8)% SL; orbital length 8.6 in SL; margin of preopercle finely serrate, the serrae 33 (28), ventral edge without antrorse spines; dorsal fin contin-uous and notched; first anal-fin spine 4.9 (5.6) in HL, second anal-fin spine 2.2 (2.6) in HL; pelvic fins relatively short, 4.0-4.3 in SL; the dorsal fin with a black blotch at base of fourth to eighth spines, one at base of the last three spines, and two at base of soft portion of fin, the dark pigment extending onto adjacent body. Copyright © 2014 Magnolia Press.

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