Central Manchester Foundation NHS Trust

Manchester, United Kingdom

Central Manchester Foundation NHS Trust

Manchester, United Kingdom
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Mills T.A.,University of Manchester | Mills T.A.,Manchester Academic Health science Center | Ricklesford C.,Central Manchester Foundation NHS Trust | Ricklesford C.,Manchester Academic Health science Center | And 7 more authors.
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth | Year: 2016

Background: Pregnancy after stillbirth or neonatal death is an emotionally challenging life-event for women and adequate emotional support during pregnancy should be considered an essential component of quality maternity care. There is a lack of evidence surrounding the role of UK maternity services in meeting womens' emotional and psychological needs in subsequent pregnancies. This study aimed to gain an overview of current UK practice and womens' experiences of care in pregnancy after the death of a baby. Methods: Online cross-sectional surveys, including open and closed questions, were completed on behalf of 138 United Kingdom (UK) Maternity Units and by 547 women who had experience of UK maternity care in pregnancy after the death of a baby. Quantitative data were analysed descriptively using SPSS software. Open textual responses were managed manually and analysed using the framework method. Results: Variable provision of care and support in subsequent pregnancies was identified from maternity unit responses. A minority had specific written guidance to support care delivery, with a focus on antenatal surveillance and monitoring for complications through increased consultant involvement and technological surveillance (ultrasound/cardiotocography). Availability of specialist services and professionals with specific skills to provide emotional and psychological support was patchy. There was a lack of evaluation/dissemination of developments and innovative practice. Responses across all UK regions demonstrated that women engaged early with maternity care and placed high value on professionals as a source of emotional support. Many women were positive about their care, but a significant minority reported negative experiences. Four common themes summarised womens' perceptions of the most important influences on quality and areas for development: sensitive communication and conduct of staff, appropriate organisation and delivery of services, increased monitoring and surveillance and perception of standard vs. special care. Conclusions: These findings expose likely inequity in provision of care for UK parents in pregnancy after stillbirth or neonatal death. Many parents do not receive adequate emotional and psychological support increasing the risk of poor health outcomes. There is an urgent need to improve the evidence base and develop specific interventions to enhance appropriate and sensitive care pathways for parents. © 2016 Mills et al.


PubMed | University of Manchester, Mcfarlane and Central Manchester Foundation NHS Trust
Type: | Journal: BMC pregnancy and childbirth | Year: 2016

Pregnancy after stillbirth or neonatal death is an emotionally challenging life-event for women and adequate emotional support during pregnancy should be considered an essential component of quality maternity care. There is a lack of evidence surrounding the role of UK maternity services in meeting womens emotional and psychological needs in subsequent pregnancies. This study aimed to gain an overview of current UK practice and womens experiences of care in pregnancy after the death of a baby.Online cross-sectional surveys, including open and closed questions, were completed on behalf of 138 United Kingdom (UK) Maternity Units and by 547 women who had experience of UK maternity care in pregnancy after the death of a baby. Quantitative data were analysed descriptively using SPSS software. Open textual responses were managed manually and analysed using the framework method.Variable provision of care and support in subsequent pregnancies was identified from maternity unit responses. A minority had specific written guidance to support care delivery, with a focus on antenatal surveillance and monitoring for complications through increased consultant involvement and technological surveillance (ultrasound/cardiotocography). Availability of specialist services and professionals with specific skills to provide emotional and psychological support was patchy. There was a lack of evaluation/dissemination of developments and innovative practice. Responses across all UK regions demonstrated that women engaged early with maternity care and placed high value on professionals as a source of emotional support. Many women were positive about their care, but a significant minority reported negative experiences. Four common themes summarised womens perceptions of the most important influences on quality and areas for development: sensitive communication and conduct of staff, appropriate organisation and delivery of services, increased monitoring and surveillance and perception of standard vs. special care.These findings expose likely inequity in provision of care for UK parents in pregnancy after stillbirth or neonatal death. Many parents do not receive adequate emotional and psychological support increasing the risk of poor health outcomes. There is an urgent need to improve the evidence base and develop specific interventions to enhance appropriate and sensitive care pathways for parents.

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