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Verma S.K.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | Singh S.K.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | Krishna H.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | Krishna H.,Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station
International Journal of Fruit Science | Year: 2010

A study entailing four rootstocks was designed under glasshouse conditions to select the most suitable rootstock for the grape cultivar Pusa Urvashi on the basis of growth, physiological, biochemical, and nutrient changes brought about by stionic influence, which may have implications on vigor and stress tolerance of the composite plant. The performance of 'Pusa Urvashi' scions on four rootstocks was compared with its performance when grafted on its own roots. The foliar tissue analysis revealed that the rootstocks induced alteration in different biochemicals in the grafted vines. Compared to 'Pusa Urvashi' grafted on itself, the grafted rootstock-derived plants exhibited improved physiological and nutrient status. Rootstocks also showed satisfactory graft healing and compatibilty under glasshouse conditions. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Source


Krishna H.,Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station | Krishna H.,Central Institute for Arid Horticulture | Attri B.L.,Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station | Kumar A.,Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Horticultural Science and Biotechnology | Year: 2013

To assess the efficacy of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) for improving the rooting and growth of hardwood cuttings of apple rootstock MM.106, three mycorrhizal species (Sclerocystis dussi, Glomus intraradices, and G. fasciculatum) were tested. Rootstock cuttings from each AMF inoculation treatment were then treated, or not treated, with the rooting hormone, indole 3-butyric acid (IBA), or a rooting inhibitor, cinnamic acid (CA) each at 2.5 g l-1. Cuttings that had not been inoculated with AMF or treated with either growth regulator served as controls.The results indicated that, after 90 d, cuttings inoculated with any of the three AMF alone, or in combination with 2.5 g l-1 IBA had significantly higher percentages of rooting and growth than the untreated controls. The combined application of AMF plus 2.5 g l-1 CA also improved the rooting percentage, which was significantly higher than in the untreated controls.Thus, the positive response to AMF inoculation was further improved when combined with 2.5 g l-1 IBA. Source


Krishna H.,Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station | Krishna H.,Central Institute for Arid Horticulture | Attri B.L.,Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station | Kumar A.,Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station
Journal of Food Science and Technology | Year: 2012

The main objective of the present investigation was to develop an improvised method for the preparation of Rhododendron squash, which otherwise had a narrow consumer’s acceptability, despite being rich in antioxidants due to faulty preparation procedure and to compare the superiority of the new method over existing preparation method by examining various antioxidants and total antioxidant capacity. For the preparation of squashes in the present investigation, Rhododendron petals were heated with water at 80 °C for 20 min and left for 3-hour (or 180 min) followed by filtration and addition of sugar with or without ginger juice. Leaving Rhododendron petals with water for 3-hour at room temperature following heating facilitated maximum recovery of anthocyanin in water. Rhododendron squashes, prepared through improvised method, were compared with a Rhododendron squash collected from the market (control) for their physico-chemical characteristics, antioxidants and sensory quality attributes. The improvised Rhododendron squashes registered higher values for most of the parameters than the control. © 2012, Association of Food Scientists & Technologists (India). Source


Ranjan J.K.,Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station | Ahmed N.,Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station | Ahmed N.,Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture | Das B.,Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station | And 2 more authors.
Indian Journal of Horticulture | Year: 2010

An experiment was conducted during rabi season of 2006 and 2007 to find out the response of garlic to the application of nitrogen fixing and phosphate solublizing biofertilizers in different combinations with reduced dose of fertilizer (RDF) in various combinations. The treatments included various combinations of Azotobacter sp., Azospirillum sp. and Microphos sp. in combination with 0%, 50% and 100% RDF. The effects of these treatments were observed at different magnitudes on various growth, yield and yield attributing characters. The growth characters in respect of plant height were found maximum in the plants receiving Azospirillum sp. + 1/2 NP and full K. The neck thickness was observed more in treatment comprised of Azospirillum sp. + Microphos sp. + 1/2 NP and full K. Bulb yield and bulb weight was maximum in treatment having Azotobacter sp.+ Azospirillum sp. + Microphos sp. + 1/2 NP and full K; however, it was on a par with Azospirillum sp. + Microphos sp. + 1/2 NP and full K treatment. The same set of nutrient management treatments was also found superior than other treatments in respect of dry matter of the bulb. Differences were not significant among the treatment with respect to horizontal diameter of bulb, number of clove per bulb and clove thickness. Thus, the treatment Azospirillum sp. + Microphos sp. + 1/2 NP and full K was found superior for better yield and yield attributing characters as well growth of the plants. Source


Ranjan P.,Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station | Das B.,Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station | Ahmed N.,Central Institute of Temperate Horticulture Regional Station
International Journal of ChemTech Research | Year: 2013

Despite the availability of ample natural resources for successful flower cultivation, our share in world flower trade is meagre. This is because most of the cut flowers need to be grown under protected conditions to meet stringent quality control regimes of global flower trade and thus require high cost which is not feasible in our country where most of the farmers are small and marginal. Moreover, the present era of global climate change looks for energy efficient system for intensive farming which has less demand for fossil fuels. Keeping these in view, an experiment was laid out with the objective to identify suitable genotypes and practices for production of high value cut flowers like carnation, gerbera and alstroemeria under zero energy greenhouses in NW Himalayas. All the genotypes differed significantly for yield and quality traits and we could identify four promising genotypes viz. Master, Laurella, Charmant and Crimson Tempo in carnation, seven in gerbera and one in alstroemeria suitable for cut flower production under naturally ventilated polyhouse made of bamboo poles or locally available wood and UV stabilised polythene sheets. This gives an added advantage to small and marginal farmers who wish to take up floriculture for more profit but could not venture due to high initial cost. They can send their produce to nearby tourist places like Nainital, Dehradun, Rishikesh, Mussoorie etc and can get good premium price of their produce without the involvement of middlemen. It may open new avenues for increasing the acreage under intensive production and ultimately to increase the floricultural exports from our country. Source

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