Central Institute of Postharvest Engineering and Technology

Ludhiāna, India

Central Institute of Postharvest Engineering and Technology

Ludhiāna, India
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Sharma S.K.,Central Institute of Postharvest Engineering and Technology | Bansal S.,Central Institute of Postharvest Engineering and Technology | Mangal M.,Central Institute of Postharvest Engineering and Technology | Dixit A.K.,Central Institute of Postharvest Engineering and Technology | And 2 more authors.
Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition | Year: 2015

Fast growing food processing industry in most countries across the world, generates huge quantity of by-products, including pomace, hull, husk, pods, peel, shells, seeds, stems, stalks, bran, washings, pulp refuse, press cakes, etc., which have less use and create considerable environmental pollution. With growing interest in health promoting functional foods, the demand of natural bioactives has increased and exploration for new sources is on the way. Many of the food processing industrial by-products are rich sources of dietary, functional, and novel fibers. These by-products can be directly (or after certain modifications for isolation or purification of fiber) used for the manufacture of various foods, i.e. bread, buns, cake, pasta, noodles, biscuit, ice creams, yogurts, cheese, beverages, milk shakes, instant breakfasts, ice tea, juices, sports drinks, wine, powdered drink, fermented milk products, meat products and meat analogues, synthetic meat, etc. A comprehensive literature survey has been carried on this topic to give an overview in the field dietary fiber from food by-products. In this article, the developments in the definition of fiber, fiber classification, potential sources of dietary fibers in food processing by-products, their uses, functional properties, caloric content, energy values and the labelling regulations have been discussed. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Devatkal S.K.,National Research Center on Meat | Jaiswal P.,Central Institute of Postharvest Engineering and Technology | Kaur A.,Central Institute of Postharvest Engineering and Technology | Juneja V.,Eastern Region Research Station
Ozone: Science and Engineering | Year: 2016

Antibacterial efficacy of aqueous ozone (O3) against B. cereus vegetative cells and S. typhimurium by was studied by using GInaFiT tool and results were validated using UV-Vis spectroscopy. Ozone gas was generated using a domestic ozone generator. Buffer solutions containing known amounts (≈108–109 cfu/mL) of bacterial pathogens were treated with aqueous ozone (200 mg/hr or 0.1 mg/l) for 16 min with sampling at 0-, 0.5-, 1-, 2-, 4-, 8- and 16-min intervals. A reduction of 4.6 log of B. cereus and 7.7 log cycle reduction of S. typhimurium was obtained in 16 min. Biphasic shoulder and double Weibull models were good fit for the experimental inactivation kinetics data. Principal Component Analysis showed discrete grouping based on the time of treatment. The highest correct classification results for SIMCA were achieved for both B. cereus and S. typhimurium after 1 and 8 min of treatment, respectively. In partial least squares regression analysis, maximum R2 values for calibration and validation were found to be 0.84, 0.80 for B. cereus and 0.90, 0.89 for S. typhimurium, respectively. © 2016 International Ozone Association.


Bisht T.S.,Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture & Technology | Sharma S.K.,Sudan University of Science and Technology | Sati R.C.,Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture & Technology | Rao V.K.,Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture & Technology | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Food Science and Technology | Year: 2015

An experiment was conducted to evaluate and standardize the protocol for enhancing recovery of oil and quality from cold pressed wild apricot kernels by using various enzymes. Wild apricot kernels were ground into powder in a grinder. Different lots of 3 kg powdered kernel were prepared and treated with different concentrations of enzyme solutions viz. Pectazyme (Pectinase), Mashzyme (Cellulase) and Pectazyme + Mashzyme. Kernel powder mixed with enzyme solutions were kept for 2 h at 50(±2) °C temperature for enzymatic treatment before its use for oil extraction through oil expeller. Results indicate that use of enzymes resulted in enhancement of oil recovery by 9.00–14.22 %. Maximum oil recovery was observed at 0.3–0.4 % enzyme concentration for both the enzymes individually, as well as in combination. All the three enzymatic treatments resulted in increasing oil yield. However, with 0.3 % (Pectazyme + Mashzyme) combination, maximum oil recovery of 47.33 % could be observed against were 33.11 % in control. The oil content left (wasted) in the cake and residue were reduced from 11.67 and 11.60 % to 7.31 and 2.72 % respectively, thus showing a high increase in efficiency of oil recovery from wild apricot kernels. Quality characteristics indicate that the oil quality was not adversely affected by enzymatic treatment. It was concluded treatment of powdered wild apricot kernels with 0.3 % (Pectazyme + Mashzyme) combination was highly effective in increasing oil recovery by 14.22 % without adversely affecting the quality and thus may be commercially used by the industry for reducing wastage of highly precious oil in the cake. © 2013, Association of Food Scientists & Technologists (India).


PubMed | Sudan University of Science and Technology, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture & Technology and Central Institute of Postharvest Engineering and Technology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of food science and technology | Year: 2015

An experiment was conducted to evaluate and standardize the protocol for enhancing recovery of oil and quality from cold pressed wild apricot kernels by using various enzymes. Wild apricot kernels were ground into powder in a grinder. Different lots of 3kg powdered kernel were prepared and treated with different concentrations of enzyme solutions viz. Pectazyme (Pectinase), Mashzyme (Cellulase) and Pectazyme + Mashzyme. Kernel powder mixed with enzyme solutions were kept for 2h at 50(2)C temperature for enzymatic treatment before its use for oil extraction through oil expeller. Results indicate that use of enzymes resulted in enhancement of oil recovery by 9.00-14.22%. Maximum oil recovery was observed at 0.3-0.4% enzyme concentration for both the enzymes individually, as well as in combination. All the three enzymatic treatments resulted in increasing oil yield. However, with 0.3% (Pectazyme + Mashzyme) combination, maximum oil recovery of 47.33% could be observed against were 33.11% in control. The oil content left (wasted) in the cake and residue were reduced from 11.67 and 11.60% to 7.31 and 2.72% respectively, thus showing a high increase in efficiency of oil recovery from wild apricot kernels. Quality characteristics indicate that the oil quality was not adversely affected by enzymatic treatment. It was concluded treatment of powdered wild apricot kernels with 0.3% (Pectazyme + Mashzyme) combination was highly effective in increasing oil recovery by 14.22% without adversely affecting the quality and thus may be commercially used by the industry for reducing wastage of highly precious oil in the cake.


Sharma R.,Guru Nanak Dev University | Sogi D.S.,Guru Nanak Dev University | Balasubramanian S.,Central Institute of Postharvest Engineering and Technology
International Journal of Food Properties | Year: 2012

Aerodynamic characteristics of shelled and unshelled sunflower seeds of four cultivars, namely NSFH-36, PSFH-118, GKSFH-2002, and SH-3322, were evaluated as a function of moisture content. In the selected moisture range (6.2-14.4% d.b.), terminal velocity of unshelled seeds varied from 2.93-3.28, 2.54-3.04, 2.46-3.13, and 2.98-3.53 ms 1, whereas for shelled seeds it varied between 2.36-3.16, 2.22-3.06, 2.14-2.98, and 2.28-3.20 ms 1 for NSFH-36, PSFH-118, GKSFH-2002, and SH-3322 cultivars, respectively. The drag coefficient decreased from 0.23-0.18, 0.31-0.20, 0.27-0.16, and 0.36-0.12 in unshelled seeds, whereas, it varied between 0.19-0.13, 0.18-0.12, 0.16-0.14, and 0.19-0.13 in shelled seeds of NSFH-36, PSFH-118, GKSFH-2002, and SH-3322 cultivars, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that variation in moisture content, as well as cultivars, either individually or their interactions influenced the terminal velocity and drag coefficient of unshelled and shelled sunflower seeds significantly. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


Sharma S.K.,Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture & Technology | Yadav V.K.,Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture & Technology | Rao V.K.,Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture & Technology | Dixit A.K.,Central Institute of Postharvest Engineering and Technology
Journal of Food Processing and Preservation | Year: 2014

To optimize the blend of sweet orange cv. Malta Common (SOM) and Seabuckthorn (SBT) pulps, for preparation of SOM-based Ready-to-serve (RTS) beverage rich in health-enhancing functional bioactives, a design layout with variable levels of three factors i.e., SBT pulp (13.18-46.82%) in SOM-SBT mixed pulp, sugar (109.77-160.23% of mixed pulp used) and peel oil (0.127-1.47mL/L of beverage), were studied. The product with 40% SBT pulp in SOM-SBT mixed pulp, 140% sugar and 0.40mL/L of peel oil was optimized with an overall desirability of 0.81. Optimized product had total soluble solids14.26 brix and acidity 0.34%, with vitamin C, amino acid, and total phenols at 21.75, 22.59 and 39.10mg%, respectively, besides having high sensory acceptability. Thus, SBT pulp can substitute the requirement of exogenous addition of citric acid in preparation of SOM based RTS beverage besides enriching the product in its health enhancing attributes. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Jha S.N.,Central Institute of Postharvest Engineering and Technology | Jaiswal P.,Central Institute of Postharvest Engineering and Technology | Narsaiah K.,Central Institute of Postharvest Engineering and Technology | Singh A.K.,Central Institute of Postharvest Engineering and Technology | And 4 more authors.
Food and Bioprocess Technology | Year: 2013

Mango is an important commercial fruit and is marketed based on their colour, firmness and taste. These sensory parameters vary with individual mango and person involved in testing. There is little or no information available on the instrumental estimation of these sensory attributes. The present study, therefore, was conducted to correlate sensory and instrumental textural attributes to explore the possibility of predicting them for seven major cultivars of mango influenced by harvesting dates and ripening period (10 days). In general, the textural property of peel, pulp and fruit decreased while sensory attributes increased during fruit ripening. Sensory qualities like taste, flavour and overall acceptability were significantly affected by harvesting date, cultivar and ripening period. Harvesting time and cultivars, however, did not influence the fruit appearance. Among textural attributes, peel firmness was closely associated with all the sensory parameters indicating that textural parameters could be useful to predict sensory profile of mango cultivars during their ripening. Cultivar-specific variations were observed while evaluating various equations (linear/polynomial/exponential/logarithmic/power) for correlating their textural and sensory attributes. Polynomial equation was found to be the best fit (highest coefficient of determination, R2) for prediction of sensory quality using textural properties of majority of mango cultivars. All cultivars under study except Alphonso collected from Maharashtra showed R2 value above 0. 911 which indicated potentiality of the fitted equations for the prediction of sensory attributes using textural characteristics of mango. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Narsaiah K.,Central Institute of Postharvest Engineering and Technology | Jha S.N.,Central Institute of Postharvest Engineering and Technology
Journal of Food Science and Technology | Year: 2012

The muscles derived from livestock are highly perishable. Rapid and nondestructive methods are essential for quality assurance of such products. Potential nondestructive methods, which can supplement or replace many of traditional time consuming destructive methods, include colour and computer image analysis, NIR spectroscopy, NMRI, electronic nose, ultrasound, X-ray imaging and biosensors. These methods are briefly described and the research work involving them for products derived from livestock is reviewed. These methods will be helpful in rapid screening of large number of samples, monitoring distribution networks, quick product recall and enhance traceability in the value chain of livestock products. With new developments in the areas of basic science related to these methods, colour, image processing, NIR spectroscopy, biosensors and ultrasonic analysis are expected to be widespread and cost effective for large scale meat quality evaluation in near future. © Association of Food Scientists & Technologists (India) 2011.


PubMed | Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture & Technology and Central Institute of Postharvest Engineering and Technology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of food science and technology | Year: 2014

A study was conducted to standardize the technology for the removal of amino acids (one of the browning reaction substrates) from sweet orange cv. Malta Common juice to reduce colour and quality deterioration in single strength juice and during subsequent concentration. Juice of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) cv. Malta Common fruits was extracted by screw type juice extractor, preserved in 500ppm SO2 and clarified by using Pectinase CCM enzyme (0.2% for 2h at 502C). For removal of amino acids juice was passed under gravity through a glass column packed with an acidic cation exchange resin (CER), Dowex-50W and quantity to be treated in one lot was standardized. The CER treated and untreated juices were concentrated to 15 and 30Brix in a rotary vacuum evaporator. Results indicate that 121ml of orange juice when passed through a glass column (5cm internal diameter) packed with cation exchange resin (Dowex-50W) upto a height of 8cm, could remove about 98.4% of the amino acids with minimum losses in other juice constituents. With cation exchange resin treatment, the non-enzymatic browning and colour deterioration of orange juice semi-concentrates was reduced to about 3 folds in comparison to untreated counterparts. The retention of vitamin C and sugars was also better in semi-concentrates prepared from cation exchange resin treated juice. Thus, cation exchange resin treatment of orange juice prior to concentration and storage is highly beneficial in reduction of non-enzymatic browning, colour deterioration and retention of nutritional, sensory quality of product during preparation and storage.


PubMed | Central Institute of Postharvest Engineering and Technology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of food science and technology | Year: 2013

The muscles derived from livestock are highly perishable. Rapid and nondestructive methods are essential for quality assurance of such products. Potential nondestructive methods, which can supplement or replace many of traditional time consuming destructive methods, include colour and computer image analysis, NIR spectroscopy, NMRI, electronic nose, ultrasound, X-ray imaging and biosensors. These methods are briefly described and the research work involving them for products derived from livestock is reviewed. These methods will be helpful in rapid screening of large number of samples, monitoring distribution networks, quick product recall and enhance traceability in the value chain of livestock products. With new developments in the areas of basic science related to these methods, colour, image processing, NIR spectroscopy, biosensors and ultrasonic analysis are expected to be widespread and cost effective for large scale meat quality evaluation in near future.

Loading Central Institute of Postharvest Engineering and Technology collaborators
Loading Central Institute of Postharvest Engineering and Technology collaborators