Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic science

Janakpuri, India

Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic science

Janakpuri, India
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Bansal S.,Central Institute of Post Harvest Engineering and Technology | Singh A.,Central Institute of Post Harvest Engineering and Technology | Mangal M.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | Mangal A.K.,Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic science | Kumar S.,National Medicinal Plant Board
Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition | Year: 2017

Adulteration in food has been a concern since the beginning of civilization, as it not only decreases the quality of food products but also results in a number of ill effects on health. Authentic testing of food and adulterant detection of various food products is required for value assessment and to assure consumer protection against fraudulent activities. Through this review we intend to compile different types of adulterations made in different food items, the health risks imposed by these adulterants and detection methods available for them. Concerns about food safety and regulation have ensured the development of various techniques like physical, biochemical/immunological and molecular techniques, for adulterant detection in food. Molecular methods are more preferable when it comes to detection of biological adulterants in food, although physical and biochemical techniques are preferable for detection of other adulterants in food. © 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Dey Y.N.,National Research Institute for Ayurveda Siddha Human Resource Development | Wanjari M.M.,National Research Institute for Ayurveda Siddha Human Resource Development | Gaidhani S.N.,Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic science | Jadhav A.D.,National Research Institute for Ayurveda Siddha Human Resource Development
Journal of Ethnopharmacology | Year: 2017

Ethnopharmacological relevance The leaves of Chenopodium album Linn. are traditionally used for correction of kidney diseases and urinary stones. The present work investigated the effect of methanolic and aqueous extracts of leaves of Chenopodium album on experimentally-induced urolithiasis in rats to substantiate its traditional use as antilithiatic agent. Materials and methods The leaf extract was standardized by HPLC. Urolithiasis was induced in rats by administration of 0.75% v/v of ethylene glycol (EG) in distilled water and in addition, vehicle or methanol (CAME) or aqueous (CAAE) extract of the leaves of Chenopodium album each in the dose 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg or Cystone (750 mg/kg) were administered daily orally for 28 days. Urolithiasis was assessed by estimating the calcium, phosphorus, urea, uric acid, and creatinine in both urine and plasma. The volume, pH and oxalate levels were also estimated in urine. The renal oxalate content was estimated in kidney while calcium oxalate deposits were observed histologically. Results The treatment with CAME or CAAE for 28 days significantly attenuated the EG-induced elevations in the urine and plasma levels of calcium, phosphorus, urea, uric acid and creatinine along with decrease in urine volume, pH and oxalates. The treatments also decreased renal tissue oxalate and deposition of oxalate crystals in kidney due to EG treatment. The effects of CAME and CAAE were comparable to standard antilithiatic agent, cystone. The findings indicate the preventive effect of CAME and CAAE which can be due to inhibitory effect on crystallization and stone dissolution. The effect was attributed to the presence of phytochemicals like flavonoids and saponins. Conclusion In conclusion, Chenopodium album leaves exhibited antilithiatic effect and validates its ethnomedicinal use in urinary disorders and kidney stones. © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd


Eluru J.R.,Shantha Biotechnics | Taranalli A.D.,KLE University | Kawatra S.,Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic science
International Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemical Research | Year: 2015

Ripe fruits of Limonia acidissima L. (Rutacae) were being used by traditional practitioners to treat diarrhoea, dysentery, tumours, asthma, vomiting, ulcers, and cardiac debility without scientific rationale. In order to provide the scientific basis for the antitumor activity, methanolic extract of Limonia acidissima L. (LAME) fruits was administered orally at a dose of 570mg/kg in the present study against mice model of Dalton’s Ascitic Lymphoma (DAL). In vitro cell cytotoxicity, Solid tumour and Liquid tumour models of DAL were used in this study to assess the anti-tumour activity. Depending on the parameters to be assessed Liquid tumour model was sub divided into group A and group B. Depending on the treatments to be received, animals in the Solid tumour, the group A and group B of Liquid tumour models were categorized into 4 groups consisting of six animals each i.e. Normal, Tumour Bearing, Tumour Bearing + 5-FU, Tumour Bearing + LAME. Solid tumour model was observed for solid tumour mass and Percentage increase in solid tumour (%IST). Post treatment changes in body weight, percentage increase in body weight, mean survival time (MST) and percentage increase in life span (%ILS) in group A; whereas tumour volume, tumour cell growth, haematological parameters, serological parameters and liver antioxidants in group B were observed. Tumour Bearing + LAME groups showed significant (P<0.05) positive changes with respect to all parameters among all the groups in comparison to Tumour Bearing group. © 2015, International Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemical Research. All rights reserved.


Singh A.,Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic science | Meena,National Institute of Ayurvedic Pharmaceutical Research | Sudeep,Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic science | Pant P.,Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic science | Padhi M.M.,Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic science
International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences | Year: 2012

The present communication attempts to evaluate the physicochemical and preliminary phytochemical studies on the extract (Hydro-alcoholic) of Andrographis paniculata Nees. (Acanthaceae). It is widely found and cultivated in tropical and subtropical Asia, south-east Asia and India. It is wide range of pharmacological effects and some of them extremely beneficial such as anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetes, antidiarrhoeal, antiviral, antimalarial, hepatoprotective, anticancer, antihuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV), immune stimulatory and antisnakebite activity. In Physicochemical parameters studies LOD was found to be 4.54%, Total ash content was 28.57% and acid-insoluble was 5.45%. The water-soluble and alcohol soluble extractive values were found to be 88.27, 55.47% respectively. Other parameters like density, solvent residue were also analysed. The levels of toxic heavy metals and microbial contamination was indicated in such herbal drugs was in permissible limit as per WHO specification. The data indicated suggest that there is requirement of in process improvement to provide better quality for consumer health in order to be competitive in international markets.


PubMed | National Research Institute for Ayurveda Siddha Human Resource Development and Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic science
Type: | Journal: Journal of ethnopharmacology | Year: 2016

The leaves of Chenopodium album Linn. are traditionally used for correction of kidney diseases and urinary stones. The present work investigated the effect of methanolic and aqueous extracts of leaves of Chenopodium album on experimentally-induced urolithiasis in rats to substantiate its traditional use as antilithiatic agent.The leaf extract was standardized by HPLC. Urolithiasis was induced in rats by administration of 0.75% v/v of ethylene glycol (EG) in distilled water and in addition, vehicle or methanol (CAME) or aqueous (CAAE) extract of the leaves of Chenopodium album each in the dose 100, 200 and 400mg/kg or Cystone (750mg/kg) were administered daily orally for 28 days. Urolithiasis was assessed by estimating the calcium, phosphorus, urea, uric acid, and creatinine in both urine and plasma. The volume, pH and oxalate levels were also estimated in urine. The renal oxalate content was estimated in kidney while calcium oxalate deposits were observed histologically.The treatment with CAME or CAAE for 28 days significantly attenuated the EG-induced elevations in the urine and plasma levels of calcium, phosphorus, urea, uric acid and creatinine along with decrease in urine volume, pH and oxalates. The treatments also decreased renal tissue oxalate and deposition of oxalate crystals in kidney due to EG treatment. The effects of CAME and CAAE were comparable to standard antilithiatic agent, cystone. The findings indicate the preventive effect of CAME and CAAE which can be due to inhibitory effect on crystallization and stone dissolution. The effect was attributed to the presence of phytochemicals like flavonoids and saponins.In conclusion, Chenopodium album leaves exhibited antilithiatic effect and validates its ethnomedicinal use in urinary disorders and kidney stones.


PubMed | National Research Institute for Ayurveda Siddha Human Resource Development, Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic science and Jiwaji University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of Ayurveda and integrative medicine | Year: 2016

Chandraprabha vati is a classical Ayurvedic formulation, markedly used for mitigation of Prameha, which correlates in many ways with obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus.The present study was aimed to investigate effect of Chandraprabha vati in experimentally-induced hyperglycemia and lipid profile alterations.Antidiabetic effect of Chandraprabha vati was studied in fifty five Wistar rats. Graded doses of Chandraprabha vati (50, 100 and 200mg/kg) were administered orally for 7 days to normal and alloxan-hyperglycemic rats (65mg/kg, intravenously), and to glucose loaded normal rats for oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Fasting plasma glucose levels were assessed on different time intervals along with plasma cholesterol and triglycerides. Metformin (500mg/kg, orally) was used as standard drug.Chandraprabha vati did not cause any significant reduction in plasma glucose levels of normal rats (p>0.05) but normalized the impaired glucose tolerance at 60 and 120 min (p<0.05-p<0.001) in OGTT when compared to vehicle control. In alloxan-hyperglycemic rats, administration of Chandraprabha vati (200mg/kg) significantly reduced plasma glucose at 3h, 12h, 3rd day and 7th day (p<0.01-p<0.001) along with reduction in cholesterol and triglycerides levels (p<0.01-p<0.001) when compared to diabetic control group. The effects were comparable with metformin.Chandraprabha vati exhibited anti-hyperglycemic effect and attenuated alterations in lipid profile. The results support the use of Chandraprabha vati for correction of Prameha in clinical practice.


PubMed | University of Kuala Lumpur, National Research Institute for Ayurveda Siddha Human Resource Development, Government Kamla Raja Girls Post Graduate Autonomous College, Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic science and Shobhit University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of intercultural ethnopharmacology | Year: 2016

The tuber of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius (Family-Araceae), commonly called suran or jimikand, has medicinal and food value. It is used in ethnomedicinal practices for correction of gastrointestinal disturbances such as constipation and hemorrhoids. The present study evaluated the effect of A. paeoniifolius tuber on gastrointestinal motor functions.The tuber was collected in December 2011, and its methanolic extract was standardized with the major phenolic compound, betulinic acid, by high-performance liquid chromatography. Rats were orally administered methanolic (APME) or aqueous (APAE) extract (250 and 500 mg/kg, each) of tuber for 7 days. Metoclopramide (MET) (3 mg/kg, orally) was used a reference prokinetic drug. The gastrointestinal parameters viz. number of feces, wet and dry weight and moisture content of feces, gastric emptying, and intestinal transit were evaluated. The isolated tissue preparations were used to check the effect of the extracts on fundus and intestinal contractility. The glucomannan and total phenolic and flavonoid contents were determined spectrophotometrically.The pre-treatment of extracts significantly increased the number of feces, wet and dry weight of feces, moisture content, gastric emptying, and intestinal transit. Results were comparable to MET. Further, APME and APAE showed a contraction of fundus and ileum in isolated preparations. APME and APAE were also found to have fair amount of glucomannan, total phenolics, and flavonoids. The results indicate the gastrokinetic potential of the tuber extracts. This may be attributed to the presence of glucomannan and betulinic acid present in the extracts.In conclusion, the tuber of A. paeoniifolius exhibits gastrokinetic activity and substantiates its traditional use in gastrointestinal motor disturbances.


PubMed | National Research Institute for Ayurveda Siddha Human Resource Development and Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic science
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of Ayurveda and integrative medicine | Year: 2016

Over exploitation of many traditional medicinal plants like Myrica esculenta has become a threat and in the near future, many medicinal plants may be unavailable for use of industry.Present study outlines the concept of plant part substitution. Stem bark and small branches of M. esculenta are compared on the basis of physicochemical analysis, phytochemical analysis, total phenolic contents, total flavonoid contents and high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) to evaluate the possibilities of using small branches in place of stem bark.Physicochemical parameters and preliminary phytochemical screening were carried out using standard methods. Total phenolic and total flavonoid contents were estimated spectrophotometrically using Folin-Ciocalteu and aluminum chloride method, respectively. CAMAG HPTLC system equipped with semi-automatic applicator was used for HPTLC profiling. n-Hexane, ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of stem bark and small branches were developed in suitable mobile phase using standard procedures and visualized in UV 254 and 366nm and in white light after derivatization within anisaldehyde-sulphuric acid reagent.Phytochemical analysis and HPTLC profile of different extracts showed the presence of almost similar phytochemicals in both stem bark and small branches.Similarities in phytochemical analysis and HPTLC profile of various extracts suggests that small branches may be used in place of stem bark. The study provides the base for further study to use small branches as a substitute of stem bark of M. esculenta.


Shenoy S.,Guru Nanak Dev University | Chaskar U.,Guru Nanak Dev University | Sandhu J.S.,Guru Nanak Dev University | Paadhi M.M.,Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic science
Journal of Ayurveda and Integrative Medicine | Year: 2012

Background: Cycling is an endurance sport relying mainly on aerobic capacity to provide fuel during long-duration cycling events. Athletes are constantly searching for new methods to improve this capacity through various nutritional and ergogenic aids. Purpose: The aim of the study was to find out the effect of Ashwagandha on the cardiorespiratory endurance capacity, that is, aerobic capacity of elite Indian cyclists. Materials and Methods: Forty elite (elite here refers to the participation of the athlete in at least state-level events) Indian cyclists were chosen randomly and were equally divided into experimental and placebo groups. The experimental group received 500 mg capsules of aqueous roots of Ashwagandha twice daily for eight weeks, whereas the placebo group received starch capsules. Outcome Measures: The baseline treadmill test for the cyclists were performed to measure their aerobic capacity in terms of maximal aerobic capacity (VO 2 max), metabolic equivalent, respiratory exchange ratio (RER), and total time for the athlete to reach his exhaustion stage. After eight weeks of supplementation, the treadmill test was again performed and results were obtained. Results: There was significant improvement in the experimental group in all parameters, whereas the placebo group did not show any change with respect to their baseline parameters. There was significant improvement in the experimental group in all parameters, namely, VO 2 max (t = 5.356; P < 0.001), METS (t = 4.483; P < 0.001), and time for exhaustion on treadmill (t = 4.813; P < 0.001) in comparison to the placebo group which did not show any change with respect to their baseline parameters. Conclusion: Ashwagandha improved the cardiorespiratory endurance of the elite athletes.


PubMed | Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic science
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of applied & basic medical research | Year: 2014

Missing data is frequently encountered in clinical studies. Unfortunately, they are often neglected or not properly handled during data analysis and this may significantly bias the results of the study, reduce study power and lead to invalid conclusions. Substantial instances of missing data are a serious problem that undermines the scientific trustworthiness of causal conclusions from clinical trials. The assumption that statistical analysis methods can compensate for such missing data is not justified. Hence aspects of clinical trial design that limit the probability of missing data should be an important objective, while planning a clinical trial. In addition to specific aspects of trial design, many components of clinical trial conduct can also limit the extent of missing data. The topic of missing data is often not a major concern until it is time for data collection and data analysis. This article discusses some basic issues about missing data as well as prospective watch outs which could reduce the occurrence of missing data. It provides some possible design considerations that should be considered in order to alleviate patients from dropping out of a clinical trial. In addition to these the concept of the missing data mechanism has also been discussed. Three types of missing data mechanisms missing completely at random, missing at random and not missing at random have been discussed in detail.

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