Time filter

Source Type

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Health advocates from AHF and other groups will host a midday protest in New York City, Thursday, May 18th, in front of the corporate headquarters of Pfizer, the world’s third largest drug company, to protest a shortage or drug stock out of the drug giant’s key syphilis medication, Bicillin L-A (Penicillin G benzathine). This is Pfizer’s third shortage of the medicine—which is the only treatment recommended by the CDC for pregnant women with the infection—in less than one year. AHF first sounded the alarm about the dangerous Bicillin shortage in May 2016 and then again in December 2016. Yet, the FDA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) simply repeated the explanation from Pfizer, the producer of Bicillin, that manufacturing contamination caused the shortage. The shortage has recurred today, leaving health providers, particularly those treating pregnant women, scrambling for supplies of the drug. This month, the New York Department of Health issued an advisory to update the community of the status of the continuing shortages of Bicillin L-A. Thursday’s protest, from 12 noon until 1:00 pm in front of Pfizer’s headquarters at 235 East 42nd (between 2nd & 3rd Avenues), is intended to attract attention to the ongoing stock outs or drug shortages as well as attract the attention of Pfizer employees as they come and go for lunch and business appointments. “Pfizer, which has the exclusive patent on Bicillin L-A, is the third largest drug company in the world, with more than $50 billion in revenue reported in 2016, yet, somehow this American pharmaceutical powerhouse has been unable or unwilling to prepare for, and/or meet the demand by medical providers, pharmacies—and patients—for its syphilis medication for nearly the entire past year,” said Jessica Reinhart, Associate Director of Community Outreach for AHF. “Through our protest, we will call on Pfizer to right this ship or allow a generic drug maker to begin manufacturing and selling the medication.” The infection rates of primary and secondary syphilis are at a record high. From 2014-2015, the national rate has increased 19 percent. The CDC continues to recommend Bicillin as the first line regimen for treatment because it is one of the most effective tools in addressing this public health crisis. Treatment alternatives such as Doxycycline can’t be considered as a reasonable replacement as Doxycycline can’t be administered to pregnant women and because the dosage requirements create serious adherence challenges for patients. The current Bicillin L-A shortage comes on the heels of an alarming Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report released in October 2016 titled: “Reported STDs at Unprecedented High in the U.S.” According to an NPR article on the CDC report, “The number of people infected with three major sexually transmitted diseases is at an all-time high, according to a CDC report released Wednesday [Oct. 19].” NPR also noted, “… the increase in reported cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis is hitting teenagers and young adults hardest.” According to Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimates, there are 20 million new STD infections each year in the United States, costing the healthcare system nearly $16 billion in direct medical costs. The agency also reports more than 110 million current cases of sexually transmitted infections in U.S. men and women. AIDS Healthcare Foundation (AHF), the largest global AIDS organization, currently provides medical care and/or services to over 722,000 individuals in 39 countries worldwide in the U.S., Africa, Latin America/Caribbean, the Asia/Pacific Region and Eastern Europe. To learn more about AHF, please visit our website: www.aidshealth.org, find us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/aidshealth and follow us @aidshealthcare.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Houston Methodist Research Institute scientists used genome sequencing to discover that an otherwise rare strain of a superbug was found in more than one-third of the Houston patients studied. This strain is resistant to many commonly used antibiotics. "Finding the otherwise uncommon strain in our city was a very surprising discovery," said James M. Musser, M.D., Ph.D., senior author and chair of the Department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine at the Houston Methodist Research Institute and Houston Methodist Hospital. "Because Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common and important cause of human infections, we urgently need to identify potential vaccine targets or other new treatments, and develop new and rapid diagnostic techniques." In the largest published study to date on the bacterial pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae, researchers sequenced the genome of more than 1,700 strains causing infections in patients over a four-year period. The study appears in the May 16 issue of mBio, an online journal published by the American Society for Microbiology. Musser said the reason why this particular strain is prevalent in the Houston area is a mystery, but is a focus of intensive ongoing research. K. pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of infections in hospitalized patients in the United States. The team's discovery documents the occurrence of an especially strong group of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in a city of approximately six million people. Musser said K. pneumoniae is a challenging pathogen because it causes serious infections, especially in hospitalized patients. K. pneumoniae typically doesn't cause disease when it lives inside human intestines. However, when it moves into other parts of the body, the bacteria can cause a range of illnesses, including pneumonia; bloodstream, wound or surgical site infections; meningitis; and urinary tract infections. Musser's team collaborated with scientists at the Argonne National Laboratory and University of Chicago to sequence and analyze the genomes of 1,777 K. pneumoniae strains causing infections between September 2011 and May 2015 in patients in the Houston Methodist system. Unexpectedly, the otherwise uncommon clone type 307 was the most abundant strain of K. pneumoniae circulating. This organism also has been periodically identified in parts of Europe, Africa, Asia and South America. However, until now, clone type 307 has not been documented to be an abundant cause of infections in one city. "Incorporating sophisticated and novel computational and molecular strategies allowed us to rapidly identify the drug-resistant strains," said S. Wesley Long, M.D., Ph.D., first author and associate director of the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory at Houston Methodist Hospital. "The faster we can successfully identify which antibiotics this strain is sensitive to, the faster a treating physician can target the appropriate therapy to these ill patients. Our discoveries also give us the tools to begin to understand how the germ is spreading throughout the Houston area." Earlier this year, K. pneumoniae made national and international headlines when the Centers for Disease Control documented the first case of an elderly Nevada woman who died from a rare form of this superbug after she failed to respond to all 26 antibiotics used in the United States. "Fortunately, the strain 307 identified in our study remains susceptible to certain antibiotics that can be used to successfully treat infected patients," said Long. Work was supported by the Fondren Foundation, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health and the Department of Health and Human Service (HHSN272201400027C). Other collaborators on the mBio paper include Randall J. Olsen, Todd Eagar, Stephen Beres, and Picheng Zhao (Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX); and James Davis, Thomas Brettin and Fangfang Xia (Argonne National Laboratory and University of Chicago, Chicago, IL).


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

Women can get well! Don't let them be in the dark about postpartum depression and perinatal mood disorders. --Eugene, OR May 22, 2017:  Author and speaker, Judy Dippel has released her latest book,It is now available in paperback and Kindle editions on Amazon (FREE to Kindle Unlimited Members). amzn.to/2pjcGWVBizarre and misunderstood, postpartum depression can strip the joy from what should be the happiest time in a woman's life. Women feel totally alone. They don't have a clue what's wrong. The harsh reality is that it feels like being in the fog of an unexplained emotional nightmare, of which a woman cannot shake herself free. Isolated and uninformed, this strange condition leaves women feeling unstable, maybe even crazy. The message of this book is a welcome life preserver of hope and help that can be hard to find, because women don't know where to turn. The clinical facts and statistics bring immediate relief. "No, I'm not the only one."—because they most often feel as if no one else has ever experienced this.This book brings good news and is a great relief to women and those who love them!  They aren't a bad mom. It's not their fault and they can get well. Contrary to how they feel, it won't last forever. But they need to be told the truth and this book helps them face this condition for what it is. Clinical postpartum depression and/or accompanying perinatal mood disorders cause intense suffering and distress among (USA Centers for Disease Control reports) 11-20% of new mothers. Feelings of shame and embarrassment cause women to isolate themselves, but this book reveals  the facts, shares other women's stories, encourages proper medical care, and offers the unconditional love and spiritual guidance found in God. Women need accessible  help to identify what is wrong to break the dark grip of postpartum depression. http:www.postpartum.netThey can walk toward wellness, mentally and physically, emotionally and spiritually in what is a dark and disturbing time. The truth within this book dispels myths, and is combined with God's guiding words for the heart and soul, to bring peace amidst the feelings of inner chaos. Examples from other women's stories reveal how it feels. And author Judy Dippel is a woman who experienced it firsthand, and she transparently shares parts of her story. The sound consulting advice of therapists who specialize in PPD is interwoven throughout this book. http://www.judydippel.com This book is an important message for anyone who is pregnant, or suffering in a maze of confusing thoughts and symptoms after the birth of their baby. It's for the husbands, mothers and friends who love and care for them; reading this helps friends and family relay to their loved one what other women have experienced;real facts, real strategies to move toward wellness. The beauty of the truth helps women shed their fears and phobias to better help themselves, have renewed hope, or maybe even break the grip before it takes hold!Judy Dippel wants readers to understand that postpartum depression is totally different and more serious than the "baby blues" that 80 percent of women commonly experience. PPD and the perinatal mood disorders that sometimes accompany it overcome new mothers without warning. Unrecognized and untreated, this can last for months and years, as they suffer through it without greater awareness or professional care. It can be devastating. Sadly, many do go untreated, left feeling inadequate and unstable. (Sadly, a few even become newspaper headlines. This is rare; this serious psychotic disorder occurs in 0.1 to 0.2 percent of mothers—1-2 mothers of every 1000 babies born.) Not knowing what is wrong, women ask themselves, "Is it normal?" "Is this how I am supposed to feel?" This book is an important tool for preventative care, education and awareness, and sound strategies. If women are prepared, they can more readily face it for what it is. If they are already struggling this book comes alongside them with practical tips of what they can do to help themselves right now.Excerpt from Judy's personal story:I understand that you may be feeling inadequate and less able than other mothers. I did. And I know the absolutehumiliation of admitting irrational phobias, weird thoughts and anxieties we feel out loud to someone else—especially if we do this with someone who writes it off, just because they haven't been trained about PPD as a doctor, or personally experienced it as a woman. I empathize with you if people have responded to you in an uninformed way. I know the feelings of panic and the plummeting self-esteem;and the self-questioning that follows a multitude of doctor visits that all too often bring no help or hope for the mass of unwanted and peculiar symptoms that erupt and persist.I know how it feels to simply desire to be a good mom, and the wish to be able to function in doing thedaily things, yet barely being able to drag your mind and body through the day. It shakes us to our core, because postpartum depression occurs with such a sudden onslaught of physical and emotional symptoms.I know the profound sense of aloneness, shame, embarrassment,that consumes us when afflicted with postpartum depression and/or perinatal mood disorder. It's sohard! Don't despair. What I share within this book will bring relief and help.also helps women walk toward wellness by suggesting other trusted outside resources when further help is needed. See this book on http://www.Amazon.com amzn.to/2pjcGWV Bulk quantities of a minimum 10 copies or more can be purchased and mailed to buyers directly at a discounted price, by contacting:judy@JLDwrites.com.  Judy welcomes you to contact by email or through her website to invite her to speak at meetings, workshops, or as a keynote at events.  www.JudyDippel.com


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: cen.acs.org

Certain tests used to measure blood lead levels in children and pregnant women are inaccurate and may underestimate true concentrations, the Food & Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention warned on May 17. Complaints about the tests, which are produced by Magellan Diagnostics, date back to 2014, the agencies said. The government’s warning “is based on currently available data that indicate Magellan lead tests, when performed on blood drawn from a vein, may provide results that are lower than the actual level of lead in the blood,” FDA said. The agency believes the tests are accurate, however, when used with blood from a finger or heel stick. FDA also believes other blood lead testing methods, such as atomic absorption spectroscopy, are accurate. It is unclear why Magellan lead tests perform differently with venous blood than with capillary blood from a finger or heel stick, FDA said. “FDA is deeply concerned by this situation and is warning laboratories and health care professionals that they should not use any Magellan Diagnostics lead tests with blood drawn from a vein,” said Jeffrey Shuren, director of the FDA’s Center for Devices & Radiological Health. “The agency is aggressively investigating this complicated issue to determine the cause of the inaccurate results and working with the CDC and other public health partners to address the problem as quickly as possible.” FDA estimates that about 8 million blood lead tests have been performed using the Magellan systems since the beginning of 2014. Although the majority of children tested were subject to a finger prick or a heel stick, a small percentage had blood drawn from a vein. CDC recommends retesting all children under six who had their blood drawn from a vein and had a blood lead result of less than 10 µg/deciliter with a Magellan Diagnostics lead test. “While most children likely received an accurate test result, it is important to identify those whose exposure was missed, or underestimated, so that they can receive proper care,” said Patrick Breysse, director of CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health. Children and infants are particularly vulnerable to the neurotoxic effects of lead poisoning.


New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Porto, Portugal (17-20) May shows that achieving the guideline amounts of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity is associated with significantly lower BMI and body fat in children. The study was conducted by Dr Peter Katzmarzyk and Dr Amanda Staiano at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA. Excess weight and body fat are known to be risk factors for a range of serious health problems including diabetes, cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and even dementia. There is also increasing evidence that the harmful effects of high levels of adiposity begin to manifest themselves in childhood. The Canadian 24-hour Movement Guidelines are an internationally recognised set of recommendations for healthy amounts of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), sedentary behaviour (television viewing), and sleep for children and young people. They recommend a minimum of 60 minutes MVPA on at least 5 days per week, less than 2 hours per day of TV viewing, and sleeping 9 - 11 h/night for 5 - 13 year olds, reducing to 8 - 10 h/night for 14 - 18 year olds. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between adherence to those guidelines and rates of adiposity in a sample group of 357 white (170) and African American (187) children aged 5 - 18 years. The children were recruited from the Baton Rouge, Louisiana community using media outlets and recruitment through paediatricians' offices. Activity, sedentary behaviour, and amount of sleep was measured using questionnaires while the height and weight of participating children were measured to obtain BMI which was compared with Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reference data. Obesity was defined as having a BMI greater than the 95th percentile (i.e. in the top 5% of BMI) of the reference data for a child of that age; total fat mass was measured using Dual Energy X-ray Absorption (DXA), and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was used to find the total amounts of visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) fat within the abdomen. Within the sample group, 35% of children performed the guideline amount of MVPA, 31% achieved the desired level of sedentary behaviour, and 52% met the target for sleep duration. A total of 27% of the sample group achieved none of the guidelines, whereas 36%, 28%, and 8% hit 1, 2, or all 3 of the targets respectively. A higher proportion of white children met the guidelines than African American children. The odds of being obese was 89% lower (odds ratio = 0.11, a statistically significant result) in children meeting all three guidelines compared to children meeting none of the guidelines. In children meeting 2 of 3 guidelines, there was a 40% reduced risk of obesity versus those meeting none of the guidelines; and for meeting 1 out of 3 guidelines, the risk of obesity was 24% lower versus those who met none of the guidelines. Meeting the MVPA guideline was associated with having significantly lower total fat mass, and SAT mass. Staying within the guideline amount of TV viewing was associated with having significantly lower BMI, total fat mass, and SAT mass, while meeting the sleep guideline was associated with having significantly lower BMI, total fat mass, SAT, and VAT masses. The authors noted that: "A small proportion of this sample met all 3 of the 24 h movement guidelines" and that "Meeting more components of the guidelines was associated with lower amounts of adiposity and lower odds of obesity." They conclude: "This work suggests that interventions that target multiple lifestyle behaviours may have a potent effect on levels obesity and overweight in children."


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Houston Methodist Research Institute scientists used genome sequencing to discover that an otherwise rare strain of a superbug was found in more than one-third of the Houston patients studied. This strain is resistant to many commonly used antibiotics. "Finding the otherwise uncommon strain in our city was a very surprising discovery," said James M. Musser, M.D., Ph.D., senior author and chair of the Department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine at the Houston Methodist Research Institute and Houston Methodist Hospital. "Because Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common and important cause of human infections, we urgently need to identify potential vaccine targets or other new treatments, and develop new and rapid diagnostic techniques." In the largest published study to date on the bacterial pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae, researchers sequenced the genome of more than 1,700 strains causing infections in patients over a four-year period. The study appears in the May 16 issue of mBio, an online journal published by the American Society for Microbiology. [Click here for video of James M. Musser, M.D., Ph.D., explaining this research] Musser said the reason why this particular strain is prevalent in the Houston area is a mystery, but is a focus of intensive ongoing research. K. pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of infections in hospitalized patients in the United States. The team's discovery documents the occurrence of an especially strong group of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in a city of approximately six million people. Musser said K. pneumoniae is a challenging pathogen because it causes serious infections, especially in hospitalized patients. K. pneumoniae typically doesn't cause disease when it lives inside human intestines. However, when it moves into other parts of the body, the bacteria can cause a range of illnesses, including pneumonia; bloodstream, wound or surgical site infections; meningitis; and urinary tract infections. Musser's team collaborated with scientists at the Argonne National Laboratory and University of Chicago to sequence and analyze the genomes of 1,777 K. pneumoniae strains causing infections between September 2011 and May 2015 in patients in the Houston Methodist system. Unexpectedly, the otherwise uncommon clone type 307 was the most abundant strain of K. pneumoniae circulating. This organism also has been periodically identified in parts of Europe, Africa, Asia and South America. However, until now, clone type 307 has not been documented to be an abundant cause of infections in one city. "Incorporating sophisticated and novel computational and molecular strategies allowed us to rapidly identify the drug-resistant strains," said S. Wesley Long, M.D., Ph.D., first author and associate director of the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory at Houston Methodist Hospital. "The faster we can successfully identify which antibiotics this strain is sensitive to, the faster a treating physician can target the appropriate therapy to these ill patients. Our discoveries also give us the tools to begin to understand how the germ is spreading throughout the Houston area." Earlier this year, K. pneumoniae made national and international headlines when the Centers for Disease Control documented the first case of an elderly Nevada woman who died from a rare form of this superbug after she failed to respond to all 26 antibiotics used in the United States. "Fortunately, the strain 307 identified in our study remains susceptible to certain antibiotics that can be used to successfully treat infected patients," said Long. Work was supported by the Fondren Foundation, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health and the Department of Health and Human Service (HHSN272201400027C). Other collaborators on the mBio paper include Randall J. Olsen, Todd Eagar, Stephen Beres, and Picheng Zhao (Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX); and James Davis, Thomas Brettin and Fangfang Xia (Argonne National Laboratory and University of Chicago, Chicago, IL). To speak with Dr. James Musser, contact Gale Smith, Houston Methodist, at 281.627.0439 or gsmith@houstonmethodist.org. For more information about Houston Methodist, visit houstonmethodist.org. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook. For more information: S. Long, R. Olsen, T. Eagar, S. Beres, P. Zhao, J. Davis, T. Brettin, F. Xia, J. Musser. mBio, (Online May 16, 2017). DOI: 10.1128/mBio.00489-17.


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

In addition to the ViziShot 2, Olympus will demonstrate its continued commitment to pioneering in the EBUS-TBNA field by introducing the ViziShot 2 FLEX 19 G needle, that features a brand new ergonomic handle.  When used with the Olympus BF-UC180F 2.2mm channel EBUS bronchoscope , it provides up to 84 degrees of angulation to help physicians gain access to the most difficult lymph node stations, such as 4L, with ease.  This needle has the largest inner lumen currently available in the United States, ensuring improved sample acquisition for advanced molecular testing and enabling physicians to obtain ample quantities of the high-quality specimens needed for a comprehensive histological analysis, especially when diagnosing sarcoidosis and lymphomas. "Great strides have been made in diagnosing and staging lung cancer and other diseases of the lung using minimally-invasive approaches, and we are proud of our contributions," said Kurt Heine, Group Vice President of the Endoscopy Division at Olympus America Inc.  "Our continued commitment to pulmonologists to advance minimally-invasive methods is driven by the evidence that such approaches improve patient outcomes, cost containment and patient satisfaction." Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control, with more than 400 Americans each day dying from the disease. Early diagnosis and accurate staging of lung cancer can lead to improved treatment. Other diseases are also better managed via EBUS-TBNA. In July 2013, The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) announced new recommendations for lung cancer screening for people at high risk for lung cancer, leading to increases in CT screening.  Around the same time, the American College of Chest Physicians changed its lung cancer guidelines, now recommending Endobronchial Ultrasound over surgery for lung cancer staging.  Many of these patients require follow-up care that could, by USPSTF estimates, prevent roughly 14% of the 160,000 lung cancer deaths each year.  Recent CMS increases in reimbursement for procedures related to lung cancer diagnosis allow hospitals to more readily build their lung cancer program. The new EBUS needles will be showcased at the ATS annual conference May 19-24 in Washington, D.C., booth # 923. To learn more about pulmonary therapeutic devices from Olympus, please call 1-800-848-9024 or visit us at http://medical.olympusamerica.com. About Olympus Medical Systems Group Olympus Medical Systems Group, a division of global technology leader Olympus, develops solutions for healthcare professionals that help improve clinical outcomes, reduce overall costs and enhance quality of life for their patients. By enabling less invasive procedures, innovative diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy, and early stage lung cancer evaluation and treatments, Olympus is transforming the future of healthcare.  For more information visit Olympus at www.medical.olympusamerica.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/olympus-extends-portfolio-for-ebus-tbna-at-ats-300458269.html


Ticked Off! Here's What You Need To Know About Lyme Disease On Wednesday, May 17, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control warned Americans that certain blood tests used to monitor lead levels may have delivered inaccurate results. The health officials shared that children upto six years, as well as pregnant and nursing women may need to go for a retest to get accurate results for possible lead poisoning. The FDA and CDC revealed that Magellan Diagnostics manufactured the faulty lead tests that are under scrutiny. These faulty lead tests may have inaccurately diagnosed several cases going back to 2014. The FDA and CDC believe that the original blood tests Magellan Diagnostics conducted may have misjudged the lead amount present in the blood and gave parents false assurance. The FDA indicated that all four of Magellan Diagnostic's lead testing systems — LeadCare II, LeadCare, LeadCare Ultra, and LeadCare Plus — may have provided faulty results by performing tests on vein-drawn blood. The most common method of testing lead levels in the blood is done by pricking heels and fingers instead of veins. Health officials also suggest that that the diagnosed lead levels may have been lower than the original lead levels in the blood. "The FDA is concerned that Magellan lead tests that use blood drawn from a vein may provide results that are lower than the actual level of lead in the blood. There is little evidence that Magellan tests using blood from a finger or heel stick are affected," FDA's Jeffrey Shuren stated in a press release. The FDA officials believe that roughly 8 million blood tests may have been conducted using a Magellan-developed testing system since 2014. However, most of the tests were conducted with blood drawn from the capillary and not the vein. Meridian Biosciences acquired Magellan in 2016. The company stated that only 10 percent blood tests are carried out with blood drawn from the veins and accounts for about $1.8 million of Magellan Diagnostic's revenue. "Meridian and Magellan take these matters very seriously and will continue to work closely and fully with the F.D.A. and C.D.C. to address the concerns identified with venous samples as quickly as possible," the statement asserted. Since there are a large number of cases having inaccurate lead test results, CDC health officials recommend all physicians and healthcare professionals retest all children younger than 72 months. The health officials assert that retesting should only be done for children whose blood was drawn from the vein during the test, which any Magellan Diagnostics' LeadCare System conducted, and the results determined concentration in blood of less than 10 micrograms per deciliter. Apart from children, CDC also advises pregnant and nursing women to undergo another lead test if their blood was drawn from the veins. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Roberts R.E.,University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston | Duong H.T.,Centers for Disease Control
Sleep | Year: 2014

Study Objectives: To examine the prospective, reciprocal association between sleep deprivation and depression among adolescents. Design: A community-based two-wave cohort study. Setting: A metropolitan area with a population of over 4 million. Participants: 4,175 youths 11-17 at baseline, and 3,134 of these followed up a year later. Measurements: Depression is measured using both symptoms of depression and DSM-IV major depression. Sleep deprivation is defined as ≤ 6 h of sleep per night. Results: Sleep deprivation at baseline predicted both measures of depression at follow-up, controlling for depression at baseline. Examining the reciprocal association, major depression at baseline, but not symptoms predicted sleep deprivation at follow-up. Conclusion: These results are the first to document reciprocal effects for major depression and sleep deprivation among adolescents using prospective data. The data suggest reduced quantity of sleep increases risk for major depression, which in turn increases risk for decreased sleep.


Cheng W.Y.,Centers for Disease Control
Emerging infectious diseases | Year: 2011

During November 2008-May 2009, an outbreak of 53 measles cases occurred in Taiwan. Of these, 3 cases were sporadic, and the other 50 cases could be grouped into 8 clusters by genetic analysis. We determined 7 H1 genotypes linked to importation and 1 G3 genotype linked to an untraceable source.

Loading Centers for Disease Control collaborators
Loading Centers for Disease Control collaborators