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News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

The World Health Organization (WHO) logo is pictured at the entrance of its headquarters in Geneva, January 25, 2015. REUTERS/Pierre Albouy GENEVA (Reuters) - Nine people have died and eight are sick in Liberia after attending the funeral of a religious leader, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Friday. A WHO spokeswoman said initial results reported by Liberian authorities had ruled out Ebola as the cause, but could not say whether samples were being sent to other laboratories for confirmation. On Wednesday, the WHO said Liberian health authorities were taking rapid precautionary steps after eight people died of a mystery illness, 10 months after the end of a two-year Ebola virus outbreak. "It seems all of these people were attending the funeral of a religious leader," WHO spokeswoman Fadela Chaib told a briefing in Geneva. "They have taken samples from the dead bodies, and all the samples came back negative for Ebola. They will be looking of course for other haemorrhagic fevers and for bacteria, if there was any common exposure to water contamination or food contamination," she said. Eight people remain under observation in hospital in Sinoe county, a four-hour drive southeast of the capital Monrovia, with symptoms including fever, vomiting and diarrhoea, she said. Hospital staff are wearing protective equipment and contacts of the sick are being traced in the community to see if they have fallen ill, Chaib added. "WHO, CDC (U.S. Centers for Disease Control) and other partners are providing technical and logistical support to the rapid response team that has been activated at district and county levels," she said. In June last year, the WHO declared Liberia free of active Ebola virus transmission, the last of three West African countries at the epicentre of the world's worst outbreak of the disease. The epidemic killed more than 11,300 people and infected some 28,600 from 2013 as it swept through Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia, according to WHO data. A WHO advisory group of vaccine experts is due later on Friday to issue their findings after a three-day regular meeting on vaccines. The statement would include an update on "efficacy, safety and timelines for licensing Ebola vaccines", Chaib said.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The average teenager’s schedule is jam-packed by juggling school, work, post-high school plans, family life, dating, friends and studying. It doesn’t leave much time for physical fitness, but since one out of three kids in the United States is considered overweight or obese, health and wellness of teens is a topic that can’t be ignored. Not only will participating in fitness activities help teens maintain a healthy weight, it also combats stress and depression, boosts energy levels and builds confidence. Getting teens on board the fitness train is only the first step – injury prevention education and preparation are also critical. According to the National Federation of State High School Associations, more than 7.3 million high school students annually partake in physical fitness by participating in organized sports. And since, according to the Centers for Disease Control, high school athletics account for more than 2 million injuries annually, preventing traumatic injuries should be top of mind for all parents and active teens. During April’s “Youth Sports Safety Month,” the Austin sports medicine team at Medicine in Motion has identified five essential habits that should be adopted by teenagers who are beginning to pursue a physically fit lifestyle: 1. Start small. All worthy accomplishments take time to achieve, and so does physical fitness. When teenagers begin, they shouldn’t expect massive results to happen overnight. Steady marked improvements are normal, however, when teens set reasonable goals and stick to their workout schedules. Setting smaller goals will allow participants to regularly meet and celebrate their achievements, reducing the likelihood of discouragement when larger goals aren’t rapidly attained. 2. Eat healthy. A lot of people, young and old, think that exercise is free pass to eat whatever they please. The most physically fit people know, however, that fitness is a whole body experience, including food consumption. People who start healthy eating habits in their teens are more likely to maintain those habits when they’re older, giving them a life-long fitness advantage. A few suggestions include: eat a daily healthy breakfast, cut down on processed foods, enjoy an endless amount of raw vegetables, consume lean proteins, and eat smaller meals five to six times per day. 3. Hydrate properly. The human body is, on average, made up of over 50% water. It’s an essential ingredient under normal circumstances, but when exercise and increased perspiration is involved, hydrating is even more crucial. Not only should a person drink water throughout their regular day, they should also stay reasonably hydrated during their workout. Remember that when thirst occurs, a person is already dehydrated, so keep a glass or bottle of water handy at all times. 4. Don’t skip on sleep. Teen bodies are still in flux, growing and changing – this requires a lot of sleep. When adding exercise into the mix, the body needs even more rest so it can properly repair and rebuild muscles. Teenagers should strive for at least eight hours of quality sleep every night. 5. Partner up. It’s easy to get discouraged and overwhelmed when tackling a new challenge like physical fitness, so find a friend, classmate or family member to join in the activity. Not only does the buddy system make the routines more enjoyable, partners have the advantage of being able to assist one another during difficult exercises and help each other maintain proper form to avoid injury. Medicine in Motion (MIM) specializes in providing top quality sports medicine in Austin, Texas, for athletic individuals of all ages and levels. The staff at MIM believes active bodies are healthy bodies, therefore it is the office's goal to keep patients energetic and fit. To that end, MIM provides treatment of injuries and illnesses, including the use of physical rehabilitation; promotes healthy living with personal training and nutrition coaching; and offers comprehensive sports medicine evaluations to optimize health, activity level and sports performance. For more information or for questions regarding sports medicine in Austin, contact Medicine in Motion at 512-257-2500 or visit the website at http://www.medinmotion.com.


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

GENEVA (Reuters) - Eleven people have died and five are in hospital, Liberian officials said on Friday, after contracting a mystery illness the World Health Organisation (WHO) said was linked to attendance at the funeral of a religious leader. "We are still investigating. The only thing we have ruled out is ... Ebola," said Liberia's Chief Medical Officer Francis Kateh, adding samples from the victims had been sent abroad for further testing. On Wednesday, the WHO said Liberian health authorities were taking rapid precautionary steps after eight people died of a mystery illness, 10 months after the end of a two-year Ebola virus outbreak. "It seems all of these people were attending the funeral of a religious leader," WHO spokeswoman Fadela Chaib told a briefing in Geneva. "They have taken samples from the dead bodies and all the samples came back negative for Ebola. They will be looking of course for other haemorrhagic fevers and for bacteria, if there was any common exposure to water contamination or food contamination," she said. Five people remain under observation in hospital in Sinoe county, a four-hour drive southeast of the capital Monrovia, and four have been discharged, Kateh said. The symptoms include fever, vomiting and diarrhoea, said Chaib. Hospital staff are wearing protective equipment and contacts of the sick are being traced in the community to see if they have fallen ill, she added. "WHO, CDC (U.S. Centers for Disease Control) and other partners are providing technical and logistical support to the rapid response team that has been activated at district and county levels," Chaib said. In June last year, the WHO declared Liberia free of active Ebola virus transmission, the last of three West African countries at the epicentre of the world's worst outbreak of the disease. The epidemic killed more than 11,300 people and infected some 28,600 from 2013 as it swept through Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia, according to WHO data. A WHO advisory group of vaccine experts is due later on Friday to issue their findings after a three-day regular meeting on vaccines. The statement would include an update on "efficacy, safety and timelines for licensing Ebola vaccines", Chaib said.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

FRANKFORT, KY--(Marketwired - April 12, 2017) - Kentucky Governor Bevin signed a family court reform bill into law on Monday, April 10, bringing Kentucky a step closer to making shared parenting in instances of divorce the norm in the state. The bill, House Bill 492, received unanimous support in both the House (voted 97-0) and Senate (38-0), signaling a long overdue change in our family court's approach to awarding custody in instances of divorce. The new law is also supported by an overwhelming amount of research showing it is in a child's best interest to have as close to equal time with both parents in instances of divorce, particularly early on in the process. "Children are now more likely to see both parents regularly after a divorce, which is a huge win for the children of Kentucky considering research consistently shows shared parenting is in the best interest of children when their parents divorce," said Matt Hale, Chair of National Parents Organization of Kentucky. "Plus, parents are no longer in the high-conflict winner win all and loser lose all situation." HB 492 was initiated by National Parents Organization and sponsored by Speaker Pro Tem David Osborne (R-Prospect) and Representatives Jason Petrie (R-Elkton) and Robby Mills (R-Henderson). Petrie; Hale and Dr. Ryan Schroeder, University of Louisville Sociology department chair, testified supporting the law. The new law amends KRS 403.280, allowing a court to adopt a prior parental temporary custody agreement as the court's temporary custody order. However, the agreement must be mutually agreed upon while adequately providing for the child's welfare. The new law also creates a temporary joint custody and equal parenting time presumption provided each parent files an affidavit requesting his or her portion. The equal parenting time presumption does not apply if it creates a likelihood of abuse or neglect. The law takes effect July 1st, 2017. Existing child custody arrangements are not affected. According to federal statistics from sources including the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Census Bureau, children raised by single parents account for: National Parents Organization, a charitable and educational 501 (c)(3) organization, seeks better lives for children through family law reform that establishes equal rights and responsibilities for fathers and mothers after divorce or separation. The organization is focused on promoting shared parenting and preserving a child's strong bond with both parents, which is critically important to their emotional, mental, and physical health. In 2014, National Parents Organization released the Shared Parenting Report Card, the first study to rank the states on child custody laws. Visit the National Parents Organization website at www.nationalparentsorganization.org.


The March poll of more than 2,000 U.S. adults revealed many Americans (23%) think collaboration with family members or friends is the most effective aid for a tobacco/nicotine user who is trying to quit. Nicotine replacement products such as patches, gum or mouth spray were believed the second most effective (22%), followed by prescription quitting medication (17%). Nearly half of smokers try to quit each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control, and the majority of tobacco and nicotine users say they want to quit.  Tobacco and nicotine use is the largest preventable cause of death and disease in the U.S. and a risk factor for heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, and other common chronic diseases. However, only 4 to 7 percent of smokers are successful in quitting each year. The poll found varying opinions on the helpfulness of quit supports. Most Helpful Supports for Those Trying to Quit "What's often missing—and most difficult to prescribe—is a support network dedicated to health goals," said Richard Bryce, DO, an osteopathic family physician practicing at the Community Health and Social Services Center (CHASS), a federally qualified health center in Detroit.  "As an osteopathic physician, I'm an integral member of their quit team. Together, we identify reasonable lifestyle alterations that can reduce temptation and empower change." Adjusting the patient-physicians interaction to focus on creating quit "wins" can reset the conversation, and ultimately improve outcomes, Dr. Bryce added. On average, patients require seven quit attempts before they achieve success. "Every quit counts," he noted. Osteopathic physicians review the patient's physical, emotional state as well as their environment when developing a quit plan. A shared understanding fosters success on the patient's terms. "As with any health objective, a quit plan must account for the other pressing health or financial concerns," said Dr. Bryce. "Health improvements happen when we understand the person in the context of their wider environment." A range of online and digital tools are available to support tobacco health goals, including the CDC's Quitline and Online Chat, which offer personalized support around the clock. About the American Osteopathic Association The American Osteopathic Association (AOA) represents more than 129,000 osteopathic physicians (DOs) and osteopathic medical students; promotes public health; encourages scientific research; serves as the primary certifying body for DOs; and is the accrediting agency for osteopathic medical schools. Visit DoctorsThatDO.org to learn more. Survey Methodology This survey was conducted online within the United States by Harris Poll on behalf of AOA from March 23-27, 2017 among 2,201 U.S. adults. This online survey is not based on a probability sample and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated. For complete survey methodology, including weighting variables, please contact Jessica Bardoulas. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/poll-americans-divided-on-whether-positive-or-negative-health-messages-help-smokers-quit-300450600.html


New Website Details the Alleged Sexual Abuse of Minors by Roman Catholic Clergy in 49 Countries; Advocates Expansion of the Statute of Limitations New website provides comprehensive statistical information about the alleged abuse of minors and vulnerable adults by Catholic clergy. It covers alleged abuse on six continents during the past century. It was created and designed to encourage legislation to expand the statute of limitations on sex crimes committed against minors. Spring Valley, NY, April 26, 2017 --( Pafumi's key findings of the Survivor Accounts of Catholic Clergy Abuse, Denial, Accountability and Silence (SACCADAS) database regarding alleged abuse include: · Abuse patterns in Australia/New Zealand and Canada mirror patterns observed in the United States, including the gender of the abused and the decades in which the greatest abuse occurred (1960-1989). · The average age at the time the abuse was first reported was 43 years for victims who came forward in the 21st century. Their average delay in reporting that abuse was 29 years after the abuse ended. This is strong evidence as to why the statute of limitations to report sex crimes against children must be expanded. · There is a spike in first reporting of abuse at ages 30-49 for men (nearly half of the male victims) and ages 40-59 for women (nearly half of the female victims). · Three times as many male abuse victims (8.4%) became substance abusers as compared with females. · 1 out of 4 molested male minors were altar boys, while only 1 out of 100 females were altar servers. · Nearly 10% of clergy abusers continued to abuse after their first accusation, in some case for more than 25 years after. · Attempted suicide rates were 5.3% of clergy-abuse victims, as compared with 8.6% in the general population. However actual suicides were over 30 times the rate in the general population (based on Pafumi's review of SACCADAS data compared to Centers for Disease Control data). · Over 80% of the victims abused by priests were male. Nearly 90% of the victims abused by brothers were male. Brothers represented nearly one third of clergy abusers in Australia/New Zealand, as compared with 6% in the United States. This is the result of a greater number of Catholic children who resided in Catholic boarding schools. Well over half of the victims abused by nuns were female. Only 4% of clergy molesters abused children of both sexes. The website is both fee-free and ad-free. It does not require registration, although there is a Contact Us feature for users who wish to be notified about major updates to the site. There is also a companion VictimsSpeakDB Blog. It permits registration for users who wish to keep apprised of ongoing research studies derived from the SACCADAS database. About the Publisher G.R. Pafumi is an author, financial engineer, content engineer and quantitative analyst. He developed risk analysis products for hedge funds and was chief investment strategist and co-portfolio manager of a São Paulo based hedge fund. He is the founder and chief executive of InvestmentMetriX Corp., a website-based provider of quantitative financial information, and was a content engineer at NewsGrade.com, Inc., an early internet startup. He has over 40 years’ experience as a research analyst and portfolio manager. He was previously associated with Merrill Lynch, Morgan Stanley and HSBC Bank. Mr. Pafumi received his B.S. degree in finance and engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. He also has an M.S. in Quantitative Analysis as well as an M.B.A. in Finance from New York University. He has been cited in the financial media and has appeared on the CNBC, CNN, NBC and PBS television networks. His book, “Is Our Vision of God Obsolete? Often What We Believe Is Not What We Observe,” compared the universe and our place in it, as articulated in the Bible, with the evidence available from contemporary science and discovery. In “The Origin and Rise, Decline and Fall of the God Known as Yahweh: Why the God of Abraham Is Incongruous in the 21st Century,” Mr. Pafumi traced the history of the Israelites back 4,000 years to Egypt, based on modern archaeological discoveries. His most recent book, “Bless Me Father, For You Have Sinned: Resident evil in a Catholic Church populated with sexual deviates, psychopaths, sadists and nonbelievers,” delves into the worldwide abuse of children by Catholic clergy. For more information about the SACCADAS database, click on the Press Kit link below, visit the victimsspeakdb.org website, or write us at PressOffice@VictimsSpeakDB.org. Books authored by G.R. Pafumi can be viewed at Amazon.com/author/grpafumi, which offers the Look Inside feature. Spring Valley, NY, April 26, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Author and quantitative analyst G.R. Pafumi announces the launch of his newest website, VictimsSpeakDB.org. It is derived from the proprietary Survivor Accounts of Catholic Clergy Abuse, Denial, Accountability and Silence (SACCADAS) database. The site provides comprehensive analyses of the sexual abuse of minors and vulnerable adults in 49 countries on six continents. VictimsSpeakDB.org includes statistical data detailing the alleged abuse of over 9,000 victims molested by nearly 3,000 Catholic clergy, dating as far back as the 1920s, and as recently as 2017. The launch of the new website was timed to coincide with pending state legislation to expand the SOL (statute of limitations) for survivors of childhood sexual abuse.Pafumi's key findings of the Survivor Accounts of Catholic Clergy Abuse, Denial, Accountability and Silence (SACCADAS) database regarding alleged abuse include:· Abuse patterns in Australia/New Zealand and Canada mirror patterns observed in the United States, including the gender of the abused and the decades in which the greatest abuse occurred (1960-1989).· The average age at the time the abuse was first reported was 43 years for victims who came forward in the 21st century. Their average delay in reporting that abuse was 29 years after the abuse ended. This is strong evidence as to why the statute of limitations to report sex crimes against children must be expanded.· There is a spike in first reporting of abuse at ages 30-49 for men (nearly half of the male victims) and ages 40-59 for women (nearly half of the female victims).· Three times as many male abuse victims (8.4%) became substance abusers as compared with females.· 1 out of 4 molested male minors were altar boys, while only 1 out of 100 females were altar servers.· Nearly 10% of clergy abusers continued to abuse after their first accusation, in some case for more than 25 years after.· Attempted suicide rates were 5.3% of clergy-abuse victims, as compared with 8.6% in the general population. However actual suicides were over 30 times the rate in the general population (based on Pafumi's review of SACCADAS data compared to Centers for Disease Control data).· Over 80% of the victims abused by priests were male. Nearly 90% of the victims abused by brothers were male. Brothers represented nearly one third of clergy abusers in Australia/New Zealand, as compared with 6% in the United States. This is the result of a greater number of Catholic children who resided in Catholic boarding schools. Well over half of the victims abused by nuns were female. Only 4% of clergy molesters abused children of both sexes.The website is both fee-free and ad-free. It does not require registration, although there is a Contact Us feature for users who wish to be notified about major updates to the site. There is also a companion VictimsSpeakDB Blog. It permits registration for users who wish to keep apprised of ongoing research studies derived from the SACCADAS database.About the PublisherG.R. Pafumi is an author, financial engineer, content engineer and quantitative analyst. He developed risk analysis products for hedge funds and was chief investment strategist and co-portfolio manager of a São Paulo based hedge fund. He is the founder and chief executive of InvestmentMetriX Corp., a website-based provider of quantitative financial information, and was a content engineer at NewsGrade.com, Inc., an early internet startup. He has over 40 years’ experience as a research analyst and portfolio manager. He was previously associated with Merrill Lynch, Morgan Stanley and HSBC Bank.Mr. Pafumi received his B.S. degree in finance and engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. He also has an M.S. in Quantitative Analysis as well as an M.B.A. in Finance from New York University. He has been cited in the financial media and has appeared on the CNBC, CNN, NBC and PBS television networks. His book, “Is Our Vision of God Obsolete? Often What We Believe Is Not What We Observe,” compared the universe and our place in it, as articulated in the Bible, with the evidence available from contemporary science and discovery. In “The Origin and Rise, Decline and Fall of the God Known as Yahweh: Why the God of Abraham Is Incongruous in the 21st Century,” Mr. Pafumi traced the history of the Israelites back 4,000 years to Egypt, based on modern archaeological discoveries. His most recent book, “Bless Me Father, For You Have Sinned: Resident evil in a Catholic Church populated with sexual deviates, psychopaths, sadists and nonbelievers,” delves into the worldwide abuse of children by Catholic clergy.For more information about the SACCADAS database, click on the Press Kit link below, visit the victimsspeakdb.org website, or write us at PressOffice@VictimsSpeakDB.org. Books authored by G.R. Pafumi can be viewed at Amazon.com/author/grpafumi, which offers the Look Inside feature.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

A bizarre medical mystery can be added to the list of growing concerns about opioid use in the U.S. Since 2012 more than a dozen illicit drug users have shown up in hospitals across eastern Massachusetts with inexplicable amnesia. In some cases the patients’ memory difficulties had persisted for more than a year. Yet this bewildering condition does not appear to be the result of a simple case of tainted goods: The drug users do not appear to have used the same batch of drugs—or even the same type of substance. To get some answers, the state’s public health officials are rolling out a new requirement that clinicians who come across any patients (not just opioid users) with these types of memory deficits—along with damage to the hippocampus—must report the cases to the state. On April 3 state public health officials received the legal green light from the Massachusetts public health commissioner to make this a required, reportable condition. This technical change, which will last for one year, authorizes public health workers to collect this information and reassures clinicians that they can—and must—share case reports. In the next couple of days workers will notify emergency room personnel as well as addiction counselors and neurology specialists about the new designation via e-mail. The new reporting requirement, state officials hope, will help epidemiologists learn how widespread the issue of potential opioid-linked amnesia may be and whether patients have specific factors in common. The change was first reported by BuzzFeed News. Massachusetts officials first documented this string of amnesia cases in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) back in January. “No clear etiology exists, but at time of initial evaluation, 13 of 14 [patients] tested positive for opioids or had opioid use recorded in their medical history,” medical workers tracking this issue wrote. Most of the patients tested positive for one or more drugs including opiates, benzodiazepine, marijuana, PCP or other substances. Although extremely rare, the amnesia–drug link is also not completely unprecedented. In the past there have been several documented cases where similar amnesia was detected among cocaine users. In 2013 there was also one case reported in France where the same kind of memory loss was associated with heroin inhalation. To better understand the recent wave of cases, Scientific American spoke with state epidemiologist Alfred DeMaria, medical director of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health’s infectious disease bureau. [An edited transcript of the interview follows.] What a puzzling situation. Can you walk us through how these patients present? Basically, it’s one of two ways: They wake up in the hospital after an acute medical condition—usually an overdose or toxicity from drugs—with an unusual degree of confusion and rockiness. The other way a patient gets medical attention, is, say, the patient’s family saw him on Friday when he seemed fine and then when they talk to him on Sunday morning he doesn’t remember seeing them on Friday or what happened the day before, and this short-term amnesia leads him to get medical attention. With both cases, the patient may have no memory of what has gone on in the previous 48 hours. So this memory loss is limited to recent events? Usually it’s relatively short term, yes, and the issue, according to their MRIs, seems to be damage to the hippocampus—an area of the brain that usually helps process information into memories. These patients don’t really have problems with long-term memory. For example, as a neurologist involved in these cases described it: They can drive to work because they have been driving to work for 20 years, so they have no trouble doing that. But if they have to go someplace new and they are given directions, just simple directions, they get in the car and can’t remember what they were just told. So the issue is also processing new memories. Your case descriptions mentioned that for a couple of these patients their memory impairment lasted a year or more. Yes. Their memory gets better and everything is relative to the amount of damage to the hippocampus, presumably. But that’s the kind of deficit they have. What do you think is the likely cause of the amnesia? Substance abuse is not a simple thing. People who are using substances very rarely use just one. So that can complicate trying to understand causality. We don’t know if people who have a history of opiate drug use were using other drugs, too. Do you have a working hypothesis about what’s going on? There is some evidence that pharmaceutical versions of fentanyl can have an effect on the hippocampus—so I think our favorite hypothesis is that, with all of the synthetic fentanyl out there, it is a contamination of that drug or some fentanyl-like chemicals that could be causing this effect. There is no standardization in an illicit synthetic fentanyl lab, so who knows what is in there or even what kind of fentanyl it is. Really, this is just a hypothesis, though. There are some reports that methamphetamine can also do similar things to the hippocampus, so we wouldn’t want to write that off either. Since your original report of these 14 cases in the MMWR in January have you heard about additional cases in Massachusetts? No, it’s really interesting. The MMWR got a lot of attention, especially in Massachusetts, but we had no extra cases reported, which surprised us. We thought with all of this attention, we would see another wave of reports. If no more cases appear, how would you explain what happened? Maybe we can’t. If we don’t see any more cases, then maybe this was just a transient contamination. That would be good from a public health and medical standpoint, but it won’t let us know what’s going on. Regarding your fentanyl theory, isn’t diagnosing fentanyl use difficult because it’s not typically tested for in the emergency room? We are hoping that in the case of amnesia reports, clinicians will have access to expanded toxicological screens and coverage for them because then more extensive tests would be medically indicated. Routinely, such expanded testing studies are not done—even on overdose deaths related to drugs like fentanyl—so we are hoping that now clinicians will call us and say, “I saw this patient last night and she or he is in the hospital now and the MRI shows this hippocampal ischemia pattern. So what do you want us to do?” Then, we are going to collect some information but also say we would like you to try to get this expanded toxicology screen and an MRI to look at the hippocampus. How are the MRIs of these patients unique? It is a bilaterally symmetric effect on the hippocampus. It’s not really vascular—it’s not a stroke where you get a clot or a bleed and then there’s no blood supply. It looks more like a toxic effect that affects the metabolism of the hippocampus. Some of these patients overdosed and had low flow [of oxygen] to the brain during their overdose, and we have gotten a lot of advice and criticism saying this is just an overdose and there’s nothing new here. But our response is if it’s just an overdose, why is the damage almost exclusively limited to the hippocampus? What could be the biological mechanism at work here? There are two things I think of in terms of this outbreak: One is an outbreak related to shellfish poisoning a number of years ago. That was with something called domoic acid that actually causes amnesia not all that dissimilar to this, but more severe. In fact, a lot of people have contacted us and asked if we had thought about domoic acid. There’s no reason to think people were exposed to it here, though. I’m suspecting what’s similar here is that it’s a toxin that hones in on the hippocampus. Back in the 1980s we saw a similar amnesia situation, only then it was a contamination of drugs out in California. Someone was manufacturing a drug that was an analogue of the opioid meperidine and made a mistake in manufacturing that produced a similar chemical, a product called MPTP, that caused Parkinson’s disease–like symptoms. I keep thinking, might the recent amnesia cases be something like these two? Is this recent phenomenon being seen outside Massachusetts? We have heard from some clinicians in Oregon who think they have seen multiple cases like this, and from what they describe it seems like they may have. Are there any plans for the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists to declare this a reportable condition nationwide? No. Is it likely there is something else at work here—perhaps several factors working together, including genetics, that make for a toxic stew? Absolutely. I don’t know the causes so I’m not going to hone in on one thing to the exclusion of anything else. It’s likely a combination of factors. That’s why even if there is something out there that’s toxic, maybe only some people are susceptible to its effects. Maybe many people are exposed but only a few are vulnerable.


According to a 2017 report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), arthritis in its many forms affects 1 in 4 people in North America, costs $81 billion annually. https://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/pdf/2017-03-vitalsigns.pdf Charter Communications Local Edition for Southern California, a CNN-Headline News affiliate, interviewed formulator Brazos Minshew about the role of nutrition in arthritis. A central point of the conversation included the role of fresh fruits and vegetables in achieving optimum wellness. http://therapyalternatives.info/BrazosMinshewonCharterCommunications.mp4 According to the new Centers for Disease Control report quoted by CNN, about 54.4 million American adults (about 1 in 4) are diagnosed with painful joint inflammation and stiffness. The article went on to say that more than half of these diagnosed cases are among people under 65 years of age. Co-morbid conditions with arthritis include heart disease (49.3%), diabetes (47.1%) and obesity (30.6%). http://www.cnn.com/2017/03/07/health/americans-with-arthritis-at-all-time-high/ Brazos Minshew is a Traditional Healer of the Potawatomi Nation, a certified Traditional Naturopath and a licensed practitioner in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). He has worked Tribal medicine in North America and in the Amazon rainforest. He has been a guest lecturer in pharmacognosy at the School of Pharmacy, Ankara, Turkey and the University of Croatia, School of Pharmacy in Zagreb, Croatia. For ten years Brazos Minshew was the Chief Science Officer for TriVita, Inc., ending this relationship in 2014.


Roberts R.E.,University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston | Duong H.T.,Centers for Disease Control
Sleep | Year: 2014

Study Objectives: To examine the prospective, reciprocal association between sleep deprivation and depression among adolescents. Design: A community-based two-wave cohort study. Setting: A metropolitan area with a population of over 4 million. Participants: 4,175 youths 11-17 at baseline, and 3,134 of these followed up a year later. Measurements: Depression is measured using both symptoms of depression and DSM-IV major depression. Sleep deprivation is defined as ≤ 6 h of sleep per night. Results: Sleep deprivation at baseline predicted both measures of depression at follow-up, controlling for depression at baseline. Examining the reciprocal association, major depression at baseline, but not symptoms predicted sleep deprivation at follow-up. Conclusion: These results are the first to document reciprocal effects for major depression and sleep deprivation among adolescents using prospective data. The data suggest reduced quantity of sleep increases risk for major depression, which in turn increases risk for decreased sleep.


Cheng W.Y.,Centers for Disease Control
Emerging infectious diseases | Year: 2011

During November 2008-May 2009, an outbreak of 53 measles cases occurred in Taiwan. Of these, 3 cases were sporadic, and the other 50 cases could be grouped into 8 clusters by genetic analysis. We determined 7 H1 genotypes linked to importation and 1 G3 genotype linked to an untraceable source.

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