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PubMed | Center Veterinaire, University of Guelph, University of Pennsylvania, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences and University of California at Davis
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Veterinary surgery : VS | Year: 2016

To report the complications and outcome of dogs undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy for uncomplicated gall bladder disease.Multi-institutional case series.Client-owned dogs (n=20).Medical records of dogs that underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy were reviewed and signalment, history, clinical and ultrasound examination findings, surgical variables, and complications were collated. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed using a multiport approach. Data were compared between dogs with successful laparoscopic cholecystectomy and dogs requiring conversion to open cholecystectomy.Six dogs (30%) required conversion from laparoscopic to open cholecystectomy due to inability to ligate the cystic duct (3), evidence of gall bladder rupture (1), leakage from the cystic duct during dissection (1), and cardiac arrest (1). Cystic duct dissection was performed in 19 dogs using an articulating dissector (10), right angle forceps (7), and unrecorded (2). The cystic duct was ligated in 15 dogs using surgical clips (5), suture (6), or a combination (4). All dogs were discharged from the hospital and had resolution of clinical signs, although 1 dog developed pancreatitis and 1 dog required revision surgery for bile peritonitis. There was no significant difference in preoperative blood analysis results, surgical technique, or duration of hospitalization between dogs undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy and cases converted to open cholecystectomy.Laparoscopic cholecystectomy can be performed successfully for uncomplicated gall bladder disease in dogs after careful case selection. The surgeon considering laparoscopic cholecystectomy should be familiar with a variety of methods for cystic duct dissection and ligation to avoid difficulties during the procedure.


PubMed | Center Veterinaire, Demerx Inc., Pharmaceutical Special Projects Group LLC, Gerson Pharma Solutions LLC and 4 more.
Type: | Journal: Journal of pharmacological and toxicological methods | Year: 2016

Continuous video-electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring remains the gold standard for seizure liability assessments in preclinical drug safety assessments. EEG monitored by telemetry was used to assess the behavioral and EEG effects of noribogaine hydrochloride (noribogaine) in cynomolgus monkeys. Noribogaine is an iboga alkaloid being studied for the treatment of opioid dependence.Six cynomolgus monkeys (3 per gender) were instrumented with EEG telemetry transmitters. Noribogaine was administered to each monkey at both doses (i.e., 160 and 320mg/kg, PO) with an interval between dosing of at least 6days, and the resulting behavioral and EEG effects were evaluated. IV pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), served as a positive control for induced seizures.The administration of noribogaine at either of the doses evaluated was not associated with EEG evidence of seizure or with EEG signals known to be premonitory signs of increased seizure risk (e.g., sharp waves, unusual synchrony, shifts to high-frequency patterns). Noribogaine was associated with a mild reduction in activity levels, increased scratching, licking and chewing, and some degree of poor coordination and related clinical signs. A single monkey exhibited brief myoclonic movements that increased in frequency at the high dose, but which did not appear to generalize, cluster or to be linked with EEG abnormalities. Noribogaine was also associated with emesis and partial anorexia. In contrast, PTZ was associated with substantial pre-ictal EEG patterns including large amplitude, repetitive sharp waves leading to generalized seizures and to typical post-ictal EEG frequency attenuation.EEG patterns were within normal limits following administration of noribogaine at doses up to 320mg/kg with concurrent clinical signs that correlated with plasma exposures and resolved by the end of the monitoring period. PTZ was invariably associated with EEG paroxysmal activity leading to ictal EEG. In the current study, a noribogaine dose of 320mg/kg was considered to be the EEG no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) in conscious freely moving cynomolgus monkeys.


Scansen B.A.,Ohio State University | Kent A.M.,Center Veterinaire | Cheatham S.L.,Nationwide Childrens Hospital | Cheatham J.D.,Nationwide Childrens Hospital
Journal of Veterinary Cardiology | Year: 2014

Two dogs with severe dysplastic pulmonary valve stenosis and right-to-left shunting defects (patent foramen ovale, perimembranous ventricular septal defect) underwent palliative stenting of the right ventricular outflow tract and pulmonary valve annulus using balloon expandable stents. One dog received 2 over-lapping bare metal stents placed 7 months apart; the other received a single covered stent. Both procedures were considered technically successful with a reduction in the transpulmonary valve pressure gradient from 202 to 90mmHgin 1 dog and from 168 to 95mmHg in the other. Clinical signs of exercise intolerance and syncope were temporarily resolved in both dogs. However, progressive right ventricular concentric hypertrophy, recurrent stenosis, and erythrocytosis were observed over the subsequent 6 months leading to poor long-term outcomes. Stenting of the right ventricular outflow tract is feasible in dogs with severe dysplastic pulmonary valve stenosis, though further study and optimization of the procedure is required. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Pelosi A.,Michigan State University | Cote E.,University of Prince Edward Island | Cote E.,Center Veterinaire | Eyster G.E.,Michigan State University
Journal of Veterinary Cardiology | Year: 2011

Background: A 10 week-old intact female German shepherd dog was examined because of a heart murmur. Methods: An echocardiogram revealed an extracardiac left-to-right shunt. An angiogram identified shunting between the aorta and the pulmonary artery in an unusual location. Results: Thoracotomy was performed to better identify and correct the lesion; a tubular shunt between the left coronary artery and the pulmonary artery was found and ligated in a closed-heart procedure. The murmur resolved immediately upon ligation and the dog's heart size normalized over a period of several months after surgery. Conclusion: In the dog, surgical correction of a coronary artery-pulmonary artery shunt can be performed without complications and can be associated with reversal of cardiac remodeling. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Gatineau M.,Center Veterinaire | Dupuis J.,Center Veterinaire | Plante J.,Center Veterinaire | Moreau M.,University of Montréal
Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology | Year: 2011

Objective: To determine the rate of subsequent 'pivot shift', meniscal tear and risk factors associated with complications of tibial plateau levelling osteotomy (TPLO) and to assess clinical and owner perception outcome. Study design: Retrospective study. Sample population: Three hundred and forty-eight dogs that had undergone TPLO surgical procedures (n = 476 stifles). Methods: Medical records were reviewed for the retrieval of information on breed, sex, age, body weight, clinical history, radiograph findings, preand postoperative tibial plateau angle, limb alignment, unilateral versus bilateral disease, condition of cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) and menisci, implant material, healing time and complications. Clinical and owner-assessed questionnaire outcomes were also recorded. Results: Forty-six (9.7%) postoperative complications were reported. Twenty (4.2%) were classified as major complications requiring an additional surgical intervention, and 26 (5.5%) as minor complications. No risk factors associated with postoperative complications were identified. Ten (2.1%) subsequent meniscal injuries in the stifles with normal unaltered menisci at time of TPLO were reported with a median postoperative time of 9.5 months. Signs of postoperative 'pivot shift' were reported in 15 (3.1%) stifles. All stifles with a 'pivot shift' had a complete CCL rupture or a debrided partial CCL rupture; a medial menisectomy was identified as a risk factor for a 'pivot shift' (p = 0.02). Dogs with intact medial meniscus had a significantly higher activity level (p <0.0001) and a shorter time to peak function (p = 0.02) than dogs that underwent menisectomy according to an owner questionnaire. Conclusions: Dogs with TPLO and intact meniscus seemed to have a better and faster recovery than dogs with TPLO and menisectomy based on owner questionnaires. 'Pivot shift' was infrequent after TPLO surgery. All dogs with a 'pivot shift' had a complete CCL rupture or a debrided partial CCL rupture and menisectomy was identified as a risk factor for its occurrence. Clinical relevance: Considering the relatively low rate of subsequent meniscal injury after TPLO, systematic medial meniscal release with TPLO may be unnecessary. The 'pivot shift' deserved further investigation to completely understand its mechanism, to identify its anatomic components and potential consequences on the stifle joint. © Schattauer 2011.


Cabon Q.,Center Veterinaire
Compendium (Yardley, PA) | Year: 2013

The iliopsoas muscle is formed by the psoas major and iliacus muscles. Due to its length and diameter, the iliopsoas muscle is an important flexor and stabilizer of the hip joint and the vertebral column. Traumatic acute and chronic myopathies of the iliopsoas muscle are commonly diagnosed by digital palpation during the orthopedic examination. Clinical presentations range from gait abnormalities, lameness, and decreased hip joint extension to irreversible fibrotic contracture of the muscle. Rehabilitation of canine patients has to take into account the inciting cause, the severity of pathology and the presence of muscular imbalances.


Gatineau M.,Center Veterinaire | Dupuis J.,Center Veterinaire
Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology | Year: 2010

Luxation of the superficial digital flexor muscle tendon (SDFMT) is a rarely reported condition in dogs, and tendon tear concurrent with SDFMT luxation had never been reported. Abnormal conformation of both calcanei and strenuous activity were suspected as contributing factors in this case. Bilateral medial SDFMT luxation was surgically treated with bursa medial incision release, redundant lateral bursa excision and apposition to the edge of the SDFMT with nonabsorbable sutures. The unilateral longitudinal tendon tear of the SDFMT associated with medial SDFMT luxation was successfully treated with horizontal mattress sutures, and a good outcome was reported for both hindlimbs. © Schattauer 2010.


PubMed | Center Veterinaire
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Veterinary surgery : VS | Year: 2010

To report use of an ulnar interlocking intramedullary nail for repair of an open highly comminuted fracture of the proximal third of the antebrachium in a dog, caused by gunshot.Case report.1.5-year old, 60 kg, neutered male Mastiff.An ulnar interlocking intramedullary nail was used to stabilize an open comminuted proximal antebrachial fracture and a cast applied for 4 weeks.Union by secondary bone healing occurred in 8 weeks. At 16 weeks, there was advanced remodeling of the radial and ulnar bony callus and fracture lines were no longer evident. Limb use was normal with normal pain free range of motion of the right elbow.Ulnar interlocking nail is a viable alternative treatment for highly comminuted fracture of the proximal third of the antebrachium in dogs.


PubMed | Center Veterinaire
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Veterinary surgery : VS | Year: 2012

To determine the value of 2 diagnostic methods: (1) the reduction angle (RA) using the Ortolani maneuver and (2) the dorsal acetabular slope (DAS) from the dorsal acetabular rim (DAR) radiographic projection, to predict osteoarthritis (OA) in dogs with hip dysplasia.Prospective study.Dogs (n = 73).Hip-extended ventrodorsal (VD) radiographic projections, RA, and DAS were evaluated when dogs were 6, 12, and 24 months of age. VD projections were qualitatively scored for OA. RA was determined using the Ortolani maneuver in dorsal recumbency and DAS using the DAR projection. Distraction index (DI) measurements from the compression-distraction radiographic projections (PennHIP method) were also performed at 6 months of age. Statistical analyses were used to establish the range of values of normal and abnormal RA and DAS, to document the temporal variation in RA and DAS, to compare the ability of the different methods to predict coxofemoral OA, to determine the influence of pure passive laxity and of the DAS on the occurrence of an Ortolani sign and on the magnitude of the RA, to establish the relationship between the DAS and subsequent development of passive laxity and coxofemoral OA, and to evaluate the influence of the DAS and RA on the occurrence of coxofemoral OA with severe, moderate, and minimal coxofemoral passive joint laxity, respectively.VD, RA, DAS, and DI methods of coxofemoral joint evaluation correlated significantly with the status of the coxofemoral joints at 2 years of age. The risk of occurrence of coxofemoral OA increased, as the RA, DAS, or DI increased. There was a significant positive linear relationship between RA and DI (P = .015, r(2) = 0.32), RA and DAS (P = .0078, r(2) = 0.38), and DAS and DI (P = .015, r(2) = 0.33). A negative Ortolani sign was at all times significantly predictive of absence of coxofemoral OA at 2 years of age. DAS best predicted coxofemoral OA for DI 0.7, whereas RA best predicted coxofemoral OA for 0.3 < DI < 0.7; however, RA proved to be the best overall predictor of coxofemoral OA.RA measured at 6 months of age in dorsal recumbency was the best predictor of coxofemoral OA at 2 years of age.


PubMed | Center Veterinaire
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Veterinary and comparative orthopaedics and traumatology : V.C.O.T | Year: 2011

To determine the rate of subsequent pivot shift, meniscal tear and risk factors associated with complications of tibial plateau levelling osteotomy (TPLO) and to assess clinical and owner perception outcome.Retrospective study.Three hundred and forty-eight dogs that had undergone TPLO surgical procedures (n = 476 stifles).Medical records were reviewed for the retrieval of information on breed, sex, age, body weight, clinical history, radiograph findings, pre- and postoperative tibial plateau angle, limb alignment, unilateral versus bilateral disease, condition of cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) and menisci, implant material, healing time and complications. Clinical and owner-assessed questionnaire outcomes were also recorded.Forty-six (9.7%) postoperative complications were reported. Twenty (4.2%) were classified as major complications requiring an additional surgical intervention, and 26 (5.5%) as minor complications. No risk factors associated with postoperative complications were identified. Ten (2.1%) subsequent meniscal injuries in the stifles with normal un- altered menisci at time of TPLO were reported with a median postoperative time of 9.5 months. Signs of postoperative pivot shift were reported in 15 (3.1%) stifles. All stifles with a pivot shift had a complete CCL rupture or a debrided partial CCL rupture; a medial menisectomy was identified as a risk factor for a pivot shift (p = 0.02). Dogs with intact medial meniscus had a significantly higher activity level (p <0.0001) and a shorter time to peak function (p = 0.02) than dogs that underwent menisectomy according to an owner questionnaire.Dogs with TPLO and intact meniscus seemed to have a better and faster recovery than dogs with TPLO and menisectomy based on owner questionnaires. Pivot shift was infrequent after TPLO surgery. All dogs with a pivot shift had a complete CCL rupture or a debrided partial CCL rupture and menisectomy was identified as a risk factor for its occurrence.Considering the relatively low rate of subsequent meniscal injury after TPLO, systematic medial meniscal release with TPLO may be unnecessary. The pivot shift deserved further investigation to completely understand its mechanism, to identify its anatomic components and potential consequences on the stifle joint.

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