Center Technique du Champignon

France

Center Technique du Champignon

France

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Foulongne-Oriol M.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Dufourcq R.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Spataro C.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Devesse C.,Center Technique du Champignon | And 3 more authors.
Current Genetics | Year: 2011

To assess the feasibility of marker-assisted selection in mushrooms, a comparative mapping study between two connected populations of the white button mushroom Agaricus bisporus was performed. The first mapping population had been used already for the construction of the A. bisporus reference linkage map. In the present study, a new linkage map based on the segregation analysis of a second generation hybrid progeny was developed. In order to increase the number of available anchor markers, we developed a conversion procedure of an amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fragment into sequence-specific PCR marker. Seventeen AFLP-converted markers (ACM) were then used for mapping purpose, among which 14 were common to the two maps. The linkage map presented herein consists of 183 markers (53 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence, 16 SSR, 17 ACM, 96 AFLP and PPC1 locus), distributed among 13 linkage groups (LG), and covering 851 cM. Thanks to 84 common markers, we have stated that marker order was well conserved, except for LG I; significant unequal recombination rates occurred over the whole genome; regions with markers showing skewed segregation patterns differed between the two maps. Our results suggested a strong impact of the genetic background on recombination ability. Consequences for mushroom breeding are discussed. These maps will facilitate further comparative mapping studies of quantitative trait locus detection. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.


Foulongne-Oriol M.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Rodier A.,Center Technique du Champignon | Rousseau T.,Center Technique du Champignon | Largeteau M.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Savoie J.-M.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research
Fungal Biology | Year: 2011

Lecanicillium fungicola (formerly Verticillium fungicola) is responsible for dry bubble disease in the white button mushroom Agaricus bisporus. Selection for resistance to this pathogen raises an important challenge for mushroom breeders. We have investigated the inheritance of resistance to dry bubble under artificial inoculation in three independent experiments, using a progeny of 89 hybrids derived from an intervarietal A. bisporus var. bisporus×A. bisporus var. burnettii cross. Overall, phenotypic correlations were highly significant between the different experiments. Principal component analysis, together with analysis of variance results stated that the disease reactions were accurately assessed using the percentage of bubbles (PB) and the percentage of spotty cap mushrooms (PS) separately rather than with the combination of both. An original contribution of this study lies in the effective use of area under the disease-progress curve (AUDPC) to describe the dry bubble resistance. The continuous phenotypic distribution observed for the resistance traits suggested that tolerance to dry bubble was under polygenic control. Heritability estimates for either PB or AUDPC were high (0.67-0.86) while it was inconsistent for PS (0.33-0.68) suggesting a strong impact of the environment on this latter trait. Earliness and latent period were found highly correlated with disease incidence. The earliest strains appeared to be the most resistant ones. These results contribute to disentangle the complex fungal-fungal A. bisporus / L. fungicola interaction and to provide genetic basis as a prerequisite for mushroom breeding program. © 2011 The British Mycological Society.


Foulongne-Oriol M.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Rodier A.,Center Technique du Champignon | Savoie J.-M.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research
Applied and Environmental Microbiology | Year: 2012

Dry bubble, caused by Lecanicillium fungicola, is one of the most detrimental diseases affecting button mushroom cultivation. In a previous study, we demonstrated that breeding for resistance to this pathogen is quite challenging due to its quantitative inheritance. A second-generation hybrid progeny derived from an intervarietal cross between a wild strain and a commercial cultivar was characterized for L. fungicola resistance under artificial inoculation in three independent experiments. Analysis of quantitative trait loci (QTL) was used to determine the locations, numbers, and effects of genomic regions associated with drybubble resistance. Four traits related to resistance were analyzed. Two to four QTL were detected per trait, depending on the experiment. Two genomic regions, on linkage group X (LGX) and LGVIII, were consistently detected in the three experiments. The genomic region on LGX was detected for three of the four variables studied. The total phenotypic variance accounted for by all QTL ranged from 19.3% to 42.1% over all traits in all experiments. For most of the QTL, the favorable allele for resistance came from the wild parent, but for some QTL, the allele that contributed to a higher level of resistance was carried by the cultivar. Comparative mapping with QTL for yield-related traits revealed five colocations between resistance and yield component loci, suggesting that the resistance results from both genetic factors and fitness expression. The consequences for mushroom breeding programs are discussed. © 2012, American Society for Microbiology.


Foulongne-Oriol M.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Rodier A.,Center Technique du Champignon | Rousseau T.,Center Technique du Champignon | Savoie J.-M.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research
Applied and Environmental Microbiology | Year: 2012

As in other crops, yield is an important trait to be selected for in edible mushrooms, but its inheritance is poorly understood. Therefore, we have investigated the complex genetic architecture of yield-related traits in Agaricus bisporus through the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL), using second-generation hybrid progeny derived from a cross between a wild strain and a commercial cultivar. Yield, average weight per mushroom, number of fruiting bodies per m2, earliness, and cap color were evaluated in two independent experiments. A total of 23 QTL were detected for 7 yield-related traits. These QTL together explained between 21% (two-flushes yield) and 59% (earliness) of the phenotypic variation. Fifteen QTL (65%) were consistent between the two experiments. Four regions underlying significant QTL controlling yield, average weight, and number were detected on linkage groups II, III, IV, and X, suggesting a pleiotropic effect or tight linkage. Up to six QTL were identified for earliness. The PPC1 locus, together with two additional genomic regions, explained up to 90% of the phenotypic variation of the cap color. Alleles from the wild parent showed beneficial effects for some yield traits, suggesting that the wild germ plasm is a valuable source of variation for several agronomic traits. Our results constitute a key step toward marker-assisted selection and provide a solid foundation to go further into the biological mechanisms controlling productive traits in the button mushroom. © 2012, American Society for Microbiology.

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