Center National Detude Et Of Recherche Appliquee Faune Of Montagne

Gières, France

Center National Detude Et Of Recherche Appliquee Faune Of Montagne

Gières, France
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Aubert D.,CNR Institute of Neuroscience | Ajzenberg D.,CNR Institute of Neuroscience | Ajzenberg D.,University of Limoges | Richomme C.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | And 9 more authors.
Veterinary Parasitology | Year: 2010

Toxoplasma gondii isolates have been classified into 3 genetic types. Little is known about genotypes of T. gondii isolates in wild animals in Europe. In this report, genotypes of T. gondii isolates from wildlife in France are described. Sera from wildlife were tested for antibodies to T. gondii with the modified agglutination test, and the hearts from animals with titers superior or equal to 1:6 were bioassayed individually in mice. T.gondii was isolated from 9 of 14 seropositive red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), 12 of 33 roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), 1 of 4 deer (Cervus elaphus), 1 of 7 mouflons (Ovis gmelini musimon) and 1 of 2 common mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). No isolate was obtained by bioassay in mice of 1 fallow deer (Dama dama) and of 3 European brown hares (Lepus europaeus). Genotyping of the 24 isolates using PCR-RFLP and microsatellite markers indicated that all were type II and none of these Toxoplasma isolates was virulent for mice. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


Darmon G.,University of Savoy | Darmon G.,University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 | Bourgoin G.,University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 | Bourgoin G.,VetAgro Sup | And 6 more authors.
Biological Journal of the Linnean Society | Year: 2014

Temporal partitioning of daily activities between species may promote coexistence within animal communities by reducing behavioural interference, particularly when species highly overlap in the use of space and resources. Such a strategy may be used by Alpine chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra rupicapra) when in the presence of mouflon (Ovis gmelini musimon × Ovis sp.), an introduced highly gregarious species with a broader ecological niche, overlapping with that of chamois. Using simultaneous monitoring of 29 Global Positioning System-collared chamois and 12 mouflon, we assessed the temporal variation in activity patterns of chamois amongst two subpopulations: one without mouflon and one with mouflon, during January and August, which are the two most extreme periods of spatial overlap of mouflon with chamois distribution. Substantial differences in activity patterns between chamois and mouflon were observed (mean 13.8±10.5% in January and 10.6±11.6% in August). More subtle differences appeared between both subpopulations of chamois and persisted, regardless of the spatial overlap with mouflon (3.2±1.8% in January and 2.6±1.5% in August), thus highlighting that there is no behavioural interference from mouflon on chamois. Our findings suggest that the temporal partitioning of daily activities between chamois and mouflon, although probably a result of species-specific adaptations to environmental conditions, may contribute to their coexistence. © 2014 The Linnean Society of London.


Garel M.,Center National Detude Et Of Recherche Appliquee Faune Of Montagne | Garel M.,University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 | Bonenfant C.,University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 | Hamann J.-L.,Center National Detude Et Of Recherche Appliquee Cervides Sanglier | And 2 more authors.
Wildlife Biology | Year: 2010

Management of large herbivores could be improved by investing less effort in estimating absolute abundance and more effort tracking variation over time of indicators of ecological change (IEC) describing animal performance, herbivore impact on habitat, and relative animal abundance. To describe relative changes in animal abundance, monitoring trends in numbers through indices may constitute a useful and low cost method, especially at large spatial scales. Reliability of indices to detect trends should be evaluated before they are used in wildlife management. We compared population trends estimated from spotlight counts, a standard census method for deer populations, with population size estimates of a red deer Cervus elaphus population monitored using Capture-Mark-Recapture (CMR) methodology. We found a strong negative effect of conditions of observation (e.g. rainfall) on both the number of animals (-24.4) and the number of groups (-31.6) seen per kilometre. After controlling for observation conditions, we found that these two abundance indices were linearly correlated with CMR estimates, with the group-based index being better correlated (r = 0.75) than the individual-based index (r = 0.68). These consistent trends between indices and CMR estimates provide support in using standardised spotlight counts as an IEC describing relative changes in abundance for the monitoring and management of red deer populations. © 2010 Wildlife Biology.


Douhard M.,University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 | Bonenfant C.,University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 | Gaillard J.-M.,University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 | Hamann J.-L.,Center National Detude Et Of Recherche Appliquee Cervides Sanglier | And 3 more authors.
Wildlife Biology | Year: 2013

The successful management of large herbivores requires the monitoring of a set of indicators of ecological change (IEC) describing animal performance, herbivore impact on habitat and relative animal abundance. Roaring counts during the rut have often been used to assess the abundance of red deer Cervus elaphus populations, but a formal evaluation of this method is still lacking. In this paper, we examined the usefulness of the number of red deer recorded during roaring counts for managing red deer populations. Using standardised spotlight counts applied for the monitoring of red deer at La Petite Pierre, France, as a reference method, we found that roaring counts did not correlate with spotlight counts. Moreover, we did not find any evidence that roaring counts decreased with increasing number of male and female red deer harvested in the reserve during the previous hunting season. We thus conclude that managers should not rely on roaring counts for managing red deer populations. © Wildlife Biology, NKV.


Cazau M.,Center National Detude Et Of Recherche Appliquee Faune Of Montagne | Garel M.,Center National Detude Et Of Recherche Appliquee Faune Of Montagne | Maillard D.,Center National Detude Et Of Recherche Appliquee Faune Of Montagne
Journal of Wildlife Management | Year: 2011

We assessed the effects of prescribed burning and cutting on mouflon (Ovis gmelini musimon x Ovis sp.) spring habitat using an experimental design (17.28 ha) of 2 burned, 2 cut, and 2 untreated plots within a homogeneous stand dominated by heather (Erica cinerea and Calluna vulgaris). Overall, we found a shift in treated plots from ligneous species to herbaceous species with high digestive and energetic values for mouflon. We also found a consistently higher number of mouflon feeding on these treated habitats compared to untreated plots. Such effects were still apparent 4 years after habitat modifications. Our approaches could be used by managers to improve and maintain the range of mouflon populations experiencing habitat loss (e.g., woody plant encroachment) and for which the condition of an animal has often a high economical value through trophy hunting. © 2011 The Wildlife Society.

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