Lacassagne Center

Nice, France

Lacassagne Center

Nice, France

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Jardin F.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Delfau-Larue M.H.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Molina T.J.,University of Paris Descartes | Copie-Bergman C.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | And 16 more authors.
Leukemia and Lymphoma | Year: 2013

Elevated serum free light chains (FLCs) have been associated with an unfavorable prognosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The aim of this study was to determine the clinical relevance of a quantitative assessment of intact circulating immunoglobulin (Ig), using serum Ig heavy chain/light chain pair (HLC) measurements in patients with DLBCL. FLC and HLC were measured in 409 serum samples of patients with DLBCL included in the LNH03-B clinical trial program of the Groupe d'Etudes des Lymphomes de l'Adulte (GELA). Patients with an abnormal IgMκ/IgMλ ratio or an abnormal FLC ratio more frequently displayed adverse clinical characteristics. Patients with abnormal IgMκ/IgMλ ratios had inferior progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) as compared to patients with a normal ratio in the overall cohort (5-year PFS 44.9% vs. 69.3%, p = 0.0003 and 5-year OS 50.8% vs. 78.1%, p = 0.0003) and in the R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone) cohort (5-year OS 43.5% vs. 70.3%, p = 0.003). In multivariate analysis, including elevated FLC/HLC and International Prognostic Index (IPI), an abnormal IgMκ/IgMλ ratio (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03-2.3, p = 0.03) remained predictive of shorter progression-free survival. Gene expression profile experiments and immunohistochemistry indicate that this measurement is at least partially related to tumor cell secretion. Both elevated serum FLCs and an abnormal IgMκ/IgMλ ratio are associated with unfavorable outcomes in patients with DLBCL treated by R-CHOP. © 2013 Informa UK, Ltd.


Dubois S.,University of Rouen | Viailly P.-J.,University of Rouen | Viailly P.-J.,CNRS Informatics Systems Laboratory | Mareschal S.,University of Rouen | And 27 more authors.
Clinical Cancer Research | Year: 2016

Purpose: Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has detailed the genomic characterization of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) by identifying recurrent somatic mutations. We set out to design a clinically feasible NGS panel focusing on genes whose mutations hold potential therapeutic impact. Furthermore, for the first time, we evaluated the prognostic value of these mutations in prospective clinical trials. Experimental Design: A Lymphopanel was designed to identify mutations in 34 genes, selected according to literature and a whole exome sequencing study of relapsed/refractory DLBCL patients. The tumor DNA of 215 patients with CD20 CD20+ de novo DLBCL in the prospective, multicenter, and randomized LNH-03B LYSA clinical trials was sequenced to deep, uniform coverage with the Lymphopanel. Cell-of-origin molecular classification was obtained through gene expression profiling with HGU133+2.0 Affymetrix GeneChip arrays. Results: The Lymphopanel was informative for 96% of patients. A clear depiction of DLBCL subtype molecular heterogeneity was uncovered with the Lymphopanel, confirming that activated B-cell-like (ABC), germinal center B-cell like (GCB), and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) are frequently affected by mutations in NF-κB, epigenetic, and JAK-STAT pathways, respectively. Novel truncating immunity pathway, ITPKB, MFHAS1, and XPO1 mutations were identified as highly enriched in PMBL. Notably, TNFAIP3 and GNA13 mutations in ABC patients treated with R-CHOP were associated with significantly less favorable prognoses. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the contribution of NGS with a consensus gene panel to personalized therapy in DLBCL, highlighting the molecular heterogeneity of subtypes and identifying somatic mutations with therapeutic and prognostic impact. ©2016 AACR.


PubMed | AP HP Hopital Necker, CHU Dinant Godinne, CNRS Informatics Systems Laboratory, Laboratoire Of Pathologie and 10 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research | Year: 2016

Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has detailed the genomic characterization of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) by identifying recurrent somatic mutations. We set out to design a clinically feasible NGS panel focusing on genes whose mutations hold potential therapeutic impact. Furthermore, for the first time, we evaluated the prognostic value of these mutations in prospective clinical trials.A Lymphopanel was designed to identify mutations in 34 genes, selected according to literature and a whole exome sequencing study of relapsed/refractory DLBCL patients. The tumor DNA of 215 patients with CD20(+)de novo DLBCL in the prospective, multicenter, and randomized LNH-03B LYSA clinical trials was sequenced to deep, uniform coverage with the Lymphopanel. Cell-of-origin molecular classification was obtained through gene expression profiling with HGU133+2.0 Affymetrix GeneChip arrays.The Lymphopanel was informative for 96% of patients. A clear depiction of DLBCL subtype molecular heterogeneity was uncovered with the Lymphopanel, confirming that activated B-cell-like (ABC), germinal center B-cell like (GCB), and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) are frequently affected by mutations in NF-B, epigenetic, and JAK-STAT pathways, respectively. Novel truncating immunity pathway, ITPKB, MFHAS1, and XPO1 mutations were identified as highly enriched in PMBL. Notably, TNFAIP3 and GNA13 mutations in ABC patients treated with R-CHOP were associated with significantly less favorable prognoses.This study demonstrates the contribution of NGS with a consensus gene panel to personalized therapy in DLBCL, highlighting the molecular heterogeneity of subtypes and identifying somatic mutations with therapeutic and prognostic impact. Clin Cancer Res; 22(12); 2919-28. 2016 AACRSee related commentary by Lim and Elenitoba-Johnson, p. 2829.

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