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Roger F.,Montpellier University | Lamy B.,Montpellier University | Lamy B.,Montpellier University Hospital Center | Jumas-Bilak E.,Montpellier University | And 158 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

16S rRNA gene (rrs) is considered of low taxonomic interest in the genus Aeromonas. Here, 195 Aeromonas strains belonging to populations structured by multilocus phylogeny were studied using an original approach that considered Ribosomal Multi-Operon Diversity. This approach associated pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to assess rrn operon number and distribution across the chromosome and PCR-temporal temperature gel electrophoresis (TTGE) to assess rrs V3 region heterogeneity. Aeromonads harbored 8 to 11 rrn operons, 10 operons being observed in more than 92% of the strains. Intraspecific variability was low or nul except for A. salmonicida and A. aquariorum suggesting that large chromosomic rearrangements might occur in these two species while being extremely rarely encountered in the evolution of other taxa. rrn operon number at 8 as well as PFGE patterns were shown valuable for taxonomic purpose allowing resolution of species complexes. PCR-TTGE revealed a high rate of strains (41.5%) displaying intragenomic rrs heterogeneity. Strains isolated from human samples more frequently displayed intragenomic heterogeneity than strains recovered from non-human and environmental specimens. Intraspecific variability ranged from 0 to 76.5% of the strains. The observation of species-specific TTGE bands, the recovery of identical V3 regions in different species and the variability of intragenomic heterogeneity (1-13 divergent nucleotides) supported the occurrence of mutations and horizontal transfer in aeromonad rrs evolution. Altogether, the presence of a high number of rrn operon, the high proportion of strains harboring divergent rrs V3 region and the previously demonstrated high level of genetic diversity argued in favor of highly adaptative capabilities of aeromonads. Outstanding features observed for A. caviae supported the ongoing process of adaptation to a specialized niche represented by the gut, previously hypothesized. 16S rRNA gene is an informative marker in the genus Aeromonas for both evolutionary and polyphasic taxonomic studies provided that multi-operon fingerprinting approaches are used. © 2012 Roger et al.


Grimaldi-Bensouda L.,LA SER | Grimaldi-Bensouda L.,French National Conservatory of Arts and Crafts | Grimaldi-Bensouda L.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Alperovitch A.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | And 70 more authors.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases | Year: 2015

Background: Gout therapy includes xanthine oxidase inhibitors (XOI) and colchicine, which have both been associated with decreased cardiovascular risk. However, their effects on major cardiac events, such as myocardial infarction (MI), need to be investigated further. Objectives: To investigate whether XOIs and colchicine are associated with decreased risk of MI. Methods: This case-control study compared patients with first-ever MI and matched controls. Cases were recruited from the Pharmacoepidemiological General Research on MI registry. Controls were selected from a referent population (n=8444) from general practice settings. Results: The study sample consisted of 2277 MI patients and 4849 matched controls. Use of allopurinol was reported by 3.1% of cases and 3.8 of controls, and 1.1% of cases and controls used colchicine. The adjusted OR (95% CI) for MI with allopurinol use was 0.80 (0.59 to 1.09). When using less stringent matching criteria that allowed for inclusion of 2593 cases and 5185 controls, the adjusted OR was 0.73 (0.54 to 0.99). Similar results were found on analysis by sex and hypertension status. Colchicine used was not associated with a decreased risk of MI (aOR=1.17 (0.70 to 1.93)). Conclusions: Allopurinol may be associated with a reduced risk of MI. No decreased risk of MI was found in colchicine users. Besides its urate-lowering property, allopurinol might have a cardioprotective effect.


Grimaldi-Bensouda L.,LA SER | Grimaldi-Bensouda L.,French National Conservatory of Arts and Crafts | Grimaldi-Bensouda L.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Alperovitch A.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | And 72 more authors.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases | Year: 2014

Background: Gout therapy includes xanthine oxidase inhibitors (XOI) and colchicine, which have both been associated with decreased cardiovascular risk. However, their effects on major cardiac events, such as myocardial infarction (MI), need to be investigated further. Objectives: To investigate whether XOIs and colchicine are associated with decreased risk of MI. Methods: This case-control study compared patients with first-ever MI and matched controls. Cases were recruited from the Pharmacoepidemiological General Research on MI registry. Controls were selected from a referent population (n=8444) from general practice settings. Results: The study sample consisted of 2277 MI patients and 4849 matched controls. Use of allopurinol was reported by 3.1% of cases and 3.8 of controls, and 1.1% of cases and controls used colchicine. The adjusted OR (95% CI) for MI with allopurinol use was 0.80 (0.59 to 1.09). When using less stringent matching criteria that allowed for inclusion of 2593 cases and 5185 controls, the adjusted OR was 0.73 (0.54 to 0.99). Similar results were found on analysis by sex and hypertension status. Colchicine used was not associated with a decreased risk of MI (aOR=1.17 (0.70 to 1.93)). Conclusions: Allopurinol may be associated with a reduced risk of MI. No decreased risk of MI was found in colchicine users. Besides its urate-lowering property, allopurinol might have a cardioprotective effect. © 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd & European League Against Rheumatism.


PubMed | Service de medecine interne geriatrie, Center Hospitalier Of Langres and University of Burgundy
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Revue d'epidemiologie et de sante publique | Year: 2016

Flu vaccinations for healthcare professionals seems to be one of the most effective preventive actions in the face of a disease that carries a high risk of a potentially serious nosocomial epidemic in a geriatric environment. The aim of this study was to take stock of the flu vaccination status among caregivers in the geriatric units and to understand the reasons for their reluctance to be vaccinated, in order to put forward proposals to improve vaccination coverage.A literature search of articles published since 2000 in the area of geriatrics, infectious diseases or pneumology was mainly conducted on PubMed using the keywords caregivers, elderly, flu, influenza, nosocomial and vaccination. After reading all abstracts in English or French and ruling out irrelevant articles, only 64 relevant articles have been listed in bibliography section.Despite official recommendations, the literature reveals insufficient vaccination coverage of healthcare personnel at both the national and international level. Vaccination coverage seems to be lower among younger female non-medical staff. The factors that determine the likelihood of vaccination are the wish to protect ones self, ones family and patients/residents, as well as the experience of earlier bouts of flu. Factors that oppose vaccination are complex and related to the fear of side effects, the use of other preventive measures, the feeling that vaccination is ineffective, poor understanding of the disease and the vaccine, forgetfulness and problems of organization. Campaigns to promote vaccination that target healthcare professionals must be multidimensional and very incentive. The pedagogical message must be centered on the benefits to the individual and adjusted to socio-professional categories. Mobile strategies in the different departments to encourage staff are a pragmatic solution to this challenge. The referring doctor has an essential role to play, as does the occupational doctor in association with the hospital hygiene services.Flu vaccinations must be included in the education and training of caregivers.


Ducrocq G.,Departement Hospitalo University | Ducrocq G.,University Paris Diderot | Ducrocq G.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Puymirat E.,APHP | And 10 more authors.
American Heart Journal | Year: 2015

Background An association between transfusion during index hospitalization and increased subsequent mortality has been reported in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Whether this reflects the prognostic role of transfusion per se, or the impact of the index event leading to transfusion, remains unclear. We sought to evaluate the impact of transfusion on mortality in patients with AMI. Methods Using the nationwide FAST-MI 2005 AMI registry, we recorded anemia on admission, Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction major or minor bleeding, and transfusions during hospital stay. Multivariable analyses were performed to identify independent predictors of in-hospital and 5-year mortality. Cohorts of patients matched for propensity to receive transfusion were compared. Results Among 3541 patients with AMI, 827 (23.4%) had anemia on admission, 114 (3.2%) had minor or major bleeding, and 151 (4.3%) underwent transfusion. After multivariable analysis, both anemia and bleeding were independently associated with 5-year mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.4, 95% CI 1.2-1.6 and HR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.8, respectively), whereas transfusion did not appear to be an independent predictor (HR 1.1, 95% CI 0.8-1.5). Mortality at 5 years did not differ between cohorts matched for propensity to receive transfusion. Conclusions In this cohort, anemia on admission and bleeding during hospitalization were both associated with increased 5-year mortality in patients with myocardial infarction. Conversely, transfusion per se was not associated with lower survival. Further work is needed to clarify the optimal transfusion strategy in patients with bleeding or anemia and myocardial infarction. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Besancon University Hospital Center, Center Hospitalier Of Langres, Hopital Ambroise Pare, University of Paris Pantheon Sorbonne and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: American heart journal | Year: 2015

An association between transfusion during index hospitalization and increased subsequent mortality has been reported in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Whether this reflects the prognostic role of transfusion per se, or the impact of the index event leading to transfusion, remains unclear. We sought to evaluate the impact of transfusion on mortality in patients with AMI.Using the nationwide FAST-MI 2005 AMI registry, we recorded anemia on admission, Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction major or minor bleeding, and transfusions during hospital stay. Multivariable analyses were performed to identify independent predictors of in-hospital and 5-year mortality. Cohorts of patients matched for propensity to receive transfusion were compared.Among 3541 patients with AMI, 827 (23.4%) had anemia on admission, 114 (3.2%) had minor or major bleeding, and 151 (4.3%) underwent transfusion. After multivariable analysis, both anemia and bleeding were independently associated with 5-year mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.4, 95% CI 1.2-1.6 and HR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.8, respectively), whereas transfusion did not appear to be an independent predictor (HR 1.1, 95% CI 0.8-1.5). Mortality at 5 years did not differ between cohorts matched for propensity to receive transfusion.In this cohort, anemia on admission and bleeding during hospitalization were both associated with increased 5-year mortality in patients with myocardial infarction. Conversely, transfusion per se was not associated with lower survival. Further work is needed to clarify the optimal transfusion strategy in patients with bleeding or anemia and myocardial infarction.

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