Center for Womens Mental Health

Sun City Center, United States

Center for Womens Mental Health

Sun City Center, United States
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Patorno E.,Harvard University | Huybrechts K.F.,Harvard University | Bateman B.T.,Harvard University | Cohen J.M.,Harvard University | And 5 more authors.
New England Journal of Medicine | Year: 2017

BACKGROUND There has been concern that exposure to lithium early in pregnancy may be associated with a marked increase in the risk of Ebstein's anomaly (a right ventricular outflow tract obstruction defect) in infants and overall congenital cardiac defects, but data are conflicting and limited. METHODS We conducted a cohort study involving 1,325,563 pregnancies in women who were enrolled in Medicaid and who delivered a live-born infant between 2000 and 2010. We examined the risk of cardiac malformations among infants exposed to lithium during the first trimester as compared with unexposed infants and, in secondary analyses, with infants exposed to another commonly used mood stabilizer, lamotrigine. Risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated with control for psychiatric and medical conditions, medications, and other potential confounders. RESULTS Cardiac malformations were present in 16 of the 663 infants exposed to lithium (2.41%), 15,251 of the 1,322,955 nonexposed infants (1.15%), and 27 of the 1945 infants exposed to lamotrigine (1.39%). The adjusted risk ratio for cardiac malformations among infants exposed to lithium as compared with unexposed infants was 1.65 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02 to 2.68). The risk ratio was 1.11 (95% CI, 0.46 to 2.64) for a daily dose of 600 mg or less, 1.60 (95% CI, 0.67 to 3.80) for 601 to 900 mg, and 3.22 (95% CI, 1.47 to 7.02) for more than 900 mg. The prevalence of right ventricular outflow tract obstruction defects was 0.60% among lithium-exposed infants versus 0.18% among unexposed infants (adjusted risk ratio, 2.66; 95% CI, 1.00 to 7.06). Results were similar when lamotrigine-exposed infants were used as the reference group. CONCLUSIONS Maternal use of lithium during the first trimester was associated with an increased risk of cardiac malformations, including Ebstein's anomaly; the magnitude of this effect was smaller than had been previously postulated. © 2017 Massachusetts Medical Society.


PubMed | Psychology., Center for Womens Mental Health and Neuroscience and Psychiatry Unit
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Behavioral neuroscience | Year: 2016

Increasing evidence suggests that discrete neural networks that mediate emotion processing are activated when mothers respond to infants images or cries. Accumulating data also indicate that natural variation in maternal caregiving behavior is related to maternal oxytocin (OT) levels. However, brain activation to infant cues has not been studied comparing mothers at disparate ends of the maternal sensitivity spectrum. Based on observed mother-infant play interaction at 4-6 months postpartum in 80 antenatally recruited mothers, 15 mothers with the highest sensitivity (HSMs) and 15 mothers with the lowest sensitivity (LSMs) were followed at 7-9 months using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine brain responses to viewing videos of their own versus an unknown infant in 3 affect states (neutral, happy, and sad). Plasma OT measurements were taken from mothers following play interactions with their infant. Compared with LSMs, HSMs showed significantly greater brain activation in right superior temporal gyrus (STG) in response to own versus unknown neutral infant and to own happy versus neutral control. Changes in brain activation were significantly negatively correlated with plasma OT responses in HSMs mothers. Conversely, compared with HSMs, LSMs showed no significant activation difference in response to own infant separately or in contrast to unknown infant. Activation of STG may index sensitive maternal response to own infant stimuli. Sensitive parenting may have its unique profile in relation to brain responses which can act as biomarkers for future intervention studies that enhance sensitivity of maternal care. (PsycINFO Database Record


Psaros C.,Center for Womens Mental Health | Psaros C.,Massachusetts General Hospital | Psaros C.,Harvard University | Freeman M.,Center for Womens Mental Health | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology | Year: 2014

BACKGROUND: Many women discontinue antidepressants (ADs) when trying to conceive, although risk of depressive relapse is high. We examined the feasibility and potential clinical effect of cognitive behavioral therapy for the prevention of recurrence (CBT-PR) for women with a history of recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD) who planned to discontinue maintenance AD treatment for pregnancy. METHODS: This was an open preliminary study of CBT-PR in women (N = 12) planning or early in pregnancy with remitted MDD on maintenance ADs with a plan to discontinue ADs for pregnancy. Participants received 12 sessions of CBT-PR during the acute phase and optional monthly booster sessions during follow-up. Participants were assessed monthly during the acute phase and then twice additionally during follow-up by an independent rater using mood scales (depression module of the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale); pregnancy status was also assessed. RESULTS: Over the 24 weeks of the trial, 75% (n = 9) of participants did not restart ADs and did not relapse to depression. Of the 3 who reintroduced AD, 2 experienced a depressive relapse, whereas one did not meet full criteria for MDD. Adherence to the intervention was very good with all participants completing all therapy sessions and assessments. CONCLUSIONS: Cognitive behavioral therapy for the prevention of recurrence seems feasible and may provide protection for women with recurrent depression on ADs who discontinue their medication while trying to conceive. The extent to which euthymia is sustainable with CBT-PR requires further study; the results of which may broaden treatment choices for women in anticipation of and during pregnancy. Copyright © 2014 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

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