Center for Weight and Eating Disorders

Philadelphia, PA, United States

Center for Weight and Eating Disorders

Philadelphia, PA, United States
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Bellani M.,University of Verona | Baiano M.,Center for Weight and Eating Disorders | Brambilla P.,University of Udine | Brambilla P.,Ircss E Medea Scientific Institute
Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences | Year: 2011

Here, we briefly summarize the most consistent structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies on amygdala in major depression and debate the effects of clinical variables on amygdalar morphology. © Cambridge University Press 2011.


News Article | November 18, 2016
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

PHILADELPHIA, PA, November 18, 2016-- Dr. Thomas Wadden has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.A psychologist and educator with more than 35 years of professional experience, Dr. Wadden is internationally recognized for his expertise in the etiology and treatment of obesity and its associated eating disorders. During his tenure, he has held numerous positions at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, beginning in 1982 as Assistant Professor of Psychology and culminating in 2011 with his appointment as the Albert Stunkard Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry, an endowed professorship. He has served since 1994 as director of the Center for Weight and Eating Disorders at the University of Pennsylvania. From 1992 to 1993, he was Professor of Psychology at Syracuse University, and since 2013 has been Visiting Professor of Psychology at Haverford College in Haverford, PA, where he teaches courses on obesity and health psychology. Dr. Wadden's principal research is on the treatment of obesity by methods that have included diet, physical activity, medication, and surgery. He has published over 350 scientific papers and book chapters, and co-edited six books. His research has been supported for more than 30 years by grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and has been recognized by numerous honors, including the George Bray Founders Award and the TOPS Research Award, both from The Obesity Society. In 2015, the Obesity Society created the Thomas A. Wadden Award for Distinguished Mentorship, in recognition of his dedicated mentoring of students and early-career investigators.Dr. Wadden earned a Bachelor of Arts (awarded magna cum laude) in 1975 from Brown University, where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. He received his doctorate in psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1981 and an honorary Master of Arts from the University of Pennsylvania in 1994. As he looks to the future, he intends to continue his research, teaching, and clinical care at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


Attiah M.A.,Center for Functional and Restorative Neurosurgery | Halpern C.H.,Center for Functional and Restorative Neurosurgery | Balmuri U.,Center for Functional and Restorative Neurosurgery | Vinai P.,GNOSIS Research Group | And 5 more authors.
Annals of Surgery | Year: 2012

OBJECTIVE: The present meta-regression pools data from reports of long-term follow-up (>2 years) to assess durability of the efficacy associated with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery. DATA SOURCES: Medline and PubMed searches for articles pertaining to long-term weight loss after RYGB surgery were performed. BACKGROUND; Various studies have consistently shown short-term (<2 years) efficacy of RYGB surgery for morbid obesity, corroborated by meta-analytic techniques. Relatively few studies have assessed efficacy over longer periods of time. This is the first meta-analysis to analyze long-term effects of RYGB surgery on weight loss. METHODS: Twenty-two reports with a total of 4206 patient cases were included. Sixteen of the 22 studies had multiple follow-up times, ranging from 2 to 12.3 years (mean: 3.6 years). An inverse variance weighted model and meta-regression were used to generate the pooled percent mean excess weight loss (EWL) and the durability of EWL over time, respectively. RESULTS: Meta-regression did not reveal any significant change in EWL over time. Pooled mean EWL was 66.5%, and there was no significant association between EWL and length of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Pooling data from multiple studies meta-analytically revealed that weight loss after RYGB is maintained over the long-term. Further investigation would be necessary to ascertain similar durability in comorbidity reduction after RYGB surgery. © 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.


Allison K.C.,University of Pennsylvania | Allison K.C.,Center for Weight and Eating Disorders | Spaeth A.,University of Pennsylvania | Spaeth A.,Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology | And 2 more authors.
Current Psychiatry Reports | Year: 2016

Insomnia is related to an increased risk of eating disorders, while eating disorders are related to more disrupted sleep. Insomnia is also linked to poorer treatment outcomes for eating disorders. However, over the last decade, studies examining sleep and eating disorders have relied on surveys, with no objective measures of sleep for anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, and only actigraphy data for binge eating disorder. Sleep disturbance is better defined for night eating syndrome, where sleep efficiency is reduced and melatonin release is delayed. Studies that include objectively measured sleep and metabolic parameters combined with psychiatric comorbidity data would help identify under what circumstances eating disorders and sleep disturbance produce an additive effect for symptom severity and for whom poor sleep would increase risk for an eating disorder. Cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia may be a helpful addition to treatment of those with both eating disorder and insomnia. © 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Foster G.D.,Temple University | Wyatt H.R.,University of Colorado at Denver | Hill J.O.,University of Colorado at Denver | Makris A.P.,45 Morning Glory Way | And 11 more authors.
Annals of Internal Medicine | Year: 2010

Background: Previous studies comparing low-carbohydrate and low-fat diets have not included a comprehensive behavioral treatment, resulting in suboptimal weight loss. Objective: To evaluate the effects of 2-year treatment with a low-carbohydrate or low-fat diet, each of which was combined with a comprehensive lifestyle modification program. Design: Randomized parallel-group trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT00143936) Setting: 3 academic medical centers. Patients: 307 participants with a mean age of 45.5 years (SD, 9.7 years) and mean body mass index of 36.1 kg/m2 (SD, 3.5 kg/m2). Intervention: A low-carbohydrate diet, which consisted of limited carbohydrate intake (20 g/d for 3 months) in the form of low-glycemic index vegetables with unrestricted consumption of fat and protein. After 3 months, participants in the low-carbohydrate diet group increased their carbohydrate intake (5 g/d per wk) until a stable and desired weight was achieved. A low-fat diet consisted of limited energy intake (1200 to 1800 kcal/d; ≤30% calories from fat). Both diets were combined with comprehensive behavioral treatment. Measurements: Weight at 2 years was the primary outcome. Secondary measures included weight at 3, 6, and 12 months and serum lipid concentrations, blood pressure, urinary ketones, symptoms, bone mineral density, and body composition throughout the study. Results: Weight loss was approximately 11 kg (11%) at 1 year and 7 kg (7%) at 2 years. There were no differences in weight, body composition, or bone mineral density between the groups at any time point. During the first 6 months, the low-carbohydrate diet group had greater reductions in diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride levels, and very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, lesser reductions in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and more adverse symptoms than did the low-fat diet group. The low-carbohydrate diet group had greater increases in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels at all time points, approximating a 23% increase at 2 years. Limitation: Intensive behavioral treatment was provided, patients with dyslipidemia and diabetes were excluded, and attrition at 2 years was high. Conclusion: Successful weight loss can be achieved with either a low-fat or low-carbohydrate diet when coupled with behavioral treatment. A low-carbohydrate diet is associated with favorable changes in cardiovascular disease risk factors at 2 years. Primary Funding Source: National Institutes of Health. © 2010 American College of Physicians.


PubMed | Center for Weight and Eating Disorders, University of Pennsylvania, The Surgical Center and Drexel University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Gynecologic oncology | Year: 2016

Obesity significantly increases the risk of the development of both endometrial hyperplasia and cancer. Our objective was to assess the feasibility of two technology-based weight loss interventions in this patient population.Women with obesity (BMI30kg/m(2)) and endometrial hyperplasia or Type I endometrial cancer were randomized 1:1 to a technology-based 6month lifestyle intervention via either telemedicine or text messaging. The telemedicine arm received weekly phone calls, with weights tracked online using Withings Wi-Fi scales. The text arm received 3-5 personalized messages daily via Text4Diet. Participants maintained a 1200-1800calorie/day diet, self-monitored food intake and received exercise goals. Biomarkers (IGFBP-1, adiponectin, VEGF, IL1-beta, IL2, IL6, and IL7) were assessed pre- and post-treatment.Twenty women were randomized (Telemedicine: n=10, Text4Diet: n=10), and 90% lost weight. Many were early stage (70%) and grade (43.8%) disease with a median age of 60.5years. We observed a statistically greater weight loss in the Telemedicine arm [median loss: 9.7kg (range: 1.6-22.9kg)] versus 3.9kg (range: 0.3-11.4kg) in the Text4Diet arm (p=0.0231). Similarly, percent weight loss was greater in the Telemedicine (7.6%) as compared to the Text4Diet arm (4.1%, p=0.014). Mean serum levels of IL-2 were significantly (27.15pg/mL vs. 5.18pg/mL, p=0.0495) lower at intervention end as compared to baseline.A technology-based weight loss intervention is feasible in women with Type I endometrial cancer/hyperplasia. Both interventions produced weight loss, although more person-to-person contact produced more significant outcomes. Reductions in expression of IL-2 were related to weight loss.


Brambilla P.,University of Udine | Brambilla P.,Scientific Institute Irccs E Medea | Como G.,University of Udine | Isola M.,University of Udine | And 11 more authors.
Psychological Medicine | Year: 2012

Background Prior imaging studies have shown structural, functional and biochemical impairments in patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), particularly in the right hemisphere. In this study we investigated, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the white-matter microstructure organization in GAD.Method A total of 12 patients with DSM-IV GAD and 15 matched healthy controls underwent a magnetic resonance imaging session of diffusion weighted imaging, exploring white-matter water molecules by the means of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs). Regions of interests were placed in the frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes and in the splenium and genu of the corpus callosum, bilaterally.Results ADC measures were significantly greater in patients with GAD in the right splenium and right parietal cortex compared with healthy controls (p≤0.002). No significant correlations between ADCs and age or clinical variables were found.Conclusions We provide evidence that GAD is associated with disrupted white-matter coherence of posterior right hemisphere regions, which may partly sustain the impaired cognitive regulation of anxiety. Future diffusion imaging investigations are expected to better elucidate the communication between the parietal cortex and other right hemisphere regions in sustaining the cognitive processing of social and emotional stimuli in patients with GAD. © 2011 Cambridge University Press.


Bellani M.,University of Verona | Baiano M.,Center for Weight and Eating Disorders | Paolo B.,University of Udine | Paolo B.,Scientific Institute E Medea
Epidemiologia e Psichiatria Sociale | Year: 2010

Here we briefly summarize the most consistent structural MRI studies on hippocampus in major depression and debate the effects of clinical variables on hippocampal morphology.


Baiano M.,Center for Weight and Eating Disorders | Salvo P.,Center for Weight and Eating Disorders | Righetti P.,Center for Weight and Eating Disorders | Cereser L.,Center for Weight and Eating Disorders | And 3 more authors.
BMC Psychiatry | Year: 2014

Background: People with eating disorders (ED) often report poor health-related quality of life (HRQoL), which is explicitly correlated to illness' severity and its effects on cognitive performance. We aimed to analyze health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in subgroups of eating disorder (ED) patients by using the brief version of WHOQoL questionnaire (WHOQoL-BREF) before treatment administration. Moreover, in order to compare our findings with other published data, we carried out a comprehensive review of the literature on HRQoL in ED patients.Methods: Our review was carried out by means of an accurate data mining of PsychInfo and Medline databases and other available sources. In our cross-sectional study, eighty female ED patients (26 with bulimia nervosa, 33 with anorexia nervosa, 7 with binge eating disorder and 14 with ED not otherwise specified) completed the WHOQoL-BREF. HRQoL scores were compared among ED subgroups and clinical information (presence of previous contacts, length of illness, psychiatric comorbidity) was considered in the analysis.Results: Our review shows that with few exceptions ED patients have a poorer HRQoL than the healthy population of control and sometimes the mental component of HRQoL is the most involved dimension. Moreover, there are no differences in the HRQoL among ED groups, even if AN patients in some studies have a lower HRQoL scores. Furthermore, BED patients have a poorer HRQoL than obese patients who do not have binge episodes. Finally, all treatments were positively correlated with an improvement on general and specific QoL dimensions. In our sample, ED subgroups differed only for Psychological Health HRQoL scores (F = 4.072, df = 3; p = 0.01). No differences were found between inpatients and outpatients, treatment naïve and previously treated patients and patients with or without psychiatric comorbidity. Moreover, HRQoL scores were not correlated to length of illness within each ED subgroup.Conclusions: The analysis of the literature adds some relevant information on HRQoL in ED and may address the future research toward the exploration of specific questions. One of these may be the prominent role of Psychological Health domain in HRQoL, since our study confirms that this component is able to differentiate eating disorders. © 2014 Baiano et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


PubMed | Center for Weight and Eating Disorders, University of Verona and University of Udine
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Psychological medicine | Year: 2014

Prior imaging studies have shown structural, functional and biochemical impairments in patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), particularly in the right hemisphere. In this study we investigated, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the white-matter microstructure organization in GAD.A total of 12 patients with DSM-IV GAD and 15 matched healthy controls underwent a magnetic resonance imaging session of diffusion weighted imaging, exploring white-matter water molecules by the means of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs). Regions of interests were placed in the frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes and in the splenium and genu of the corpus callosum, bilaterally.ADC measures were significantly greater in patients with GAD in the right splenium and right parietal cortex compared with healthy controls (p0.002). No significant correlations between ADCs and age or clinical variables were found.We provide evidence that GAD is associated with disrupted white-matter coherence of posterior right hemisphere regions, which may partly sustain the impaired cognitive regulation of anxiety. Future diffusion imaging investigations are expected to better elucidate the communication between the parietal cortex and other right hemisphere regions in sustaining the cognitive processing of social and emotional stimuli in patients with GAD.

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